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2

To get the "#3-" under the "7" you will need placeholder (underscore) _ in the connected (second) figure, not the first figure: < 4 >2 < _ 3+ >4 < 7 3+ >


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Your analysis identifies the harmonic rhythm incorrectly. There are two chords per measure. The A♮ is a passing tone, not a chord tone. Therefore, this is not a deceptive cadence. Consider also that in functional theory, the submediant (vi) is related to the tonic, which explains why it is the usual target in a deceptive cadence. The supertonic is related ...


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I pretty much agree with the analysis in Peter's answer. Just to add a further hint, here -- first, this looks like two-voice counterpoint in a pseudo-baroque style. Am I correct? In that case (or if you're writing something like that), I'd encourage you to not necessarily think about "pivot chords" to accomplish the strongest modulation. Rather,...


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The chord needs to be interpreted in context. Take a look a couple bars before. After the strong arrival on V in the first bar of the first fully visible system in the photo, the piece launches into a descending sequence. The sequence (as noted by the figures 6 and 7-6 in the first bar) was clearly conceptualized as simple descending parallel "first ...


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I think you can look at this two ways: You have the sound of a Neapolitan chord with the A flat above C. The standard pre-dominant function is avoided when it moved to Gm: i6. The fact that it avoids the pre-dominant function isn't so much a contradiction, but a confirmation. It wouldn't create the expectation if it didn't sound as a Neapolitan in the first ...


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It is a neopolitan sixth! A flattened ii, 1st inversion. Points about recognising them: melody of a-flat–g–f# often occurs. Also interval diminished 3rd can be made of the notes around it. you're looking for flattened supertonic, tonic, leading-note (usually in succession) it is often cadential: occurs at / near cadence. Often a tonic 64 chord follows. as ...


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Ab7 to Gm works as the tritone in Ab7 is the same as in D7 (Gb and F# enharmonically). It's not as common in classical style as in pop and jazz but it does occur (I think it's a tritone substitution.) Classically, one often goes through the I64 and V7 after the Neapolitan but both resolutions work fine.


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The middle of the bar is in C sharp minor, and the modulation into it looks good. The 643 chord should be 53 (blank) or 753 (7) - it is a G sharp chord (or possibly dominant 7th) in root position, as it should be. The third-last note in the LH may have moved the C sharp minor to an A major chord (not key yet) and the rest looks like it is leading into A ...


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