11

It's hard to tell from the photographs* whether the entire neck has 'simply' sheared off, or whether there's some body collapse to go with it. Either way, it needs a professional. Price up the cost of a repair against cost of a new instrument. If this is the same damage as was already repaired, I'd have a serious word with whoever repaired it. Choice of; do ...


6

Looks like the whole neck has become detached from the body. If that was the original repair, it's back to the shop - either for a refund, or for the job done properly. If for another, unrelated reason a repair had to be done, it needs to go somewhere! It seems serious, but before it was a violin, it was those separate pieces of wood, which had to be glued ...


5

On a fretless bass, you'd refer to "frets" as that is the reference frame there. Violinists have "positions" which basically only reference the index finger location (as you are playing on just one string usually with one finger per note) and are mostly numbered by whole notes. So if you are playing in third position on the G string, your fingers might ...


3

If you consider that: The instrument is not worth a proper (i.e. expensive) repair You cannot afford a repair or a new instrument (at least for now) You really need to continue your practice You can tolerate some degradation of the sound You don't intend to sell it You don't intend to perform before a picky auditory You don't say who gave you this advice (...


3

Rosewood simply is a bit too soft to endure most bass strings, no matter how gentle you play. But different types of string cause very different amounts of abrasion: Standard roundwound strings are worst, they'll eventually dig even into an ebony fingerboard. Use them only if you want the brightest sound possible, and are willing to take sacrifices. ...


2

As phoog has said, this issue is common to stringed instruments. I play the guitar and learning all the notes along the freboard requires hard work, memorization and lots of practice. I don't even know all the notes across all the strings: I have a fair knowledge of the 6th (and 1st) and 5th strings. The rest I just find out on the fly by doing some ...


2

I would like to be able to clearly make out every note on the fingerboard when I look at sheet music. Sheet music does not generally indicate which string a given note is played on. Some notes will be unambiguous, but in other cases it may be ambiguous. If you see an F on the top line of the treble staff, you could play it on the E string or the A string. ...


1

This kind of lifting of the heel off of the button is often caused by an poorly fitted neck joint. If the heel isn't fitted flush to the end block when the instrument is made, the gap gets filled with glue instead of wood to wood contact, and all the stress of the strings is placed on the end button. From the picture it looks like whatever glue or filler ...


1

I believe you need to specifically say the note. Saying the fret on a fretless doesn't have much meaning due to the requirement of needing to know exactly where your finger needs to be to give you that note. Putting your finger where you would normally position it on the third fret could yield a flatter note than what you wanted. This is why it takes much ...


1

The distance for each note on the fingerboard is dependent on each instrument's setup and string height above the fingerboard, and varies from instrument to instrument. Each instrument has to be played "by ear", listening to the fingered note and making corrections to the pitch. For beginning violinists a teacher may put some finger markings on the ...


1

this is actually a problem that comes up a TON in sweep picking. players are supposed to play 2 sometimes 3 adjacent notes across different strings in rapid succession while still sounding smooth and clean. the secret is in the first knuckle of your finger (the one near the tip). let it collapse in the opposite direction it usually bends (be careful if ...


1

Why don't you just use one finger for that fret? For instance, in the first line of your tab, use your first finger as a barre on the 12th fret, and play the 15th and 14th frets using your 3rd or 4th finger. That's what I would do. But using a barre, it would be more difficult to mute one note when you play the next one. If you want to mute it, it would be ...


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