31

If you would like to see a tour de force in the use of repeated notes, have a look at Martha Argerich's performance of Scarlatti's D Minor Sonata: You will notice that she uses 321321 for the rapid notes. Since the accents fall on the first, third and fifth notes, you will see that a different finger is used for each ...


24

This does not seem to be a typo, as evidenced by a clear D♭ in the bass on page 14 of the autograph manuscript: On page 14 of Kullak's "instructive edition" found here, the editor suggests fingering the chord 5–3–1 and rolling the chord to get all three pitches:


23

Memorizing your scales accomplishes at least these four things: Trains your fingers to play common patterns found in music. There are a lot of scales in music. They're just so satisfying, why not write them? They can be a controlled environment for practicing other techniques, such as playing fast, playing in octaves, and playing fast in octaves. It trains ...


19

Yeesh, x42220 is indeed terrible. Don't feel bad about struggling with that. But the downside to x42225 in this context is that it's completely parallel to the previous chord, and that can sound cheesy1. If you don't find it objectionable, then there's no reason not to go ahead and play it that way. If you want to break up that parallel, you could always ...


18

There are no "correct" or "incorrect" fingerings for scales (or anything else). But some fingerings are obviously better than others. In particular, the 12312341... (assuming you continue for >1 octave) you learned for C, which works all the way through G, D, A, E, to B, doesn't really work well for F, because of the Bb. So generally you use 12341231... so ...


16

In piano this parenthesis with 2 fingering means that you should change finger while keeping the note played. For example at the second bar you show, you should first use your 5th finger to attack the note, and switch to your 1st finger while keeping the note played, so you can reach the next note (that is quite far) with your 5th finger.


16

This is a great question. If you keep playing you will spend a long time trying to answer it for yourself. There are many factors, and in the end such decisions are largely personal as @Tim has pointed out in his answer. In and of themselves chords don't contain any emotional content, and you might notice that the same chords feel different in different ...


15

I am not an expert in human physiology, but I believe the constraint you describe is completely normal. I think it has something to do with a shared tendon? Needless to say, my hands behave the same way. You should be able to lift the fourth finger higher if you raise the pinky at the same time, yes? What I do know about human physiology is that each joint ...


15

Since the semibreves are from the harmony in that bar - as are most of the notes in the whole bar - it's feasible to hold them on using the sustain pedal. The same could be for the l.h., as that's a stretch for a lot of players. Pedal marks aren't always given, it's often left to the player's discretion.


14

Your fallacy here is in thinking that "people with much less talent than myself are considered stronger musicians just because they know the "right" fingerings?" Listen more closely to what you have actually been told: "they say that the fingerings are an absolute must." Unless you've left something out, they never actually said you are a worse musician for ...


14

I do see why you prefer the imiimi fingering, you are following a pattern where your fingers are used to three notes on each string, and that feels good. There are some rare but serious classical guitarists that use a three finger technique (imaima) that get a similar feeling without the problems that I discuss below and @Matt also stated. It can be an even ...


14

A D7 chord consists of: D - the root note - if you leave it out the chord is ambiguous, but you might fix that by having another instrument, your voice, or the listener's imagination, fill it in. When you're the only accompaniment, however, you typically want the tonic as one of the lowest notes in your chord, as an anchor (this is why bass guitars often ...


13

The important thing is consistency. If you are playing the same style and volume, you should hit the keys the same way. When you move a finger from one key to another, you have to lift it a little. So when you play the same key twice, you should lift it a similar amount. If you want to play loud, accented notes, it may help to lift your fingers a little ...


13

There are no hard and fast rules for this. See, everybody's got different sized fingers. There are plenty of ways to play the same thing. All you've got are just some general rules. For the "piano lesson" book songs and SOME sheet music, there are little numbers next to the notes from 1 to 5. They tell you which fingers to use on the note. thumb index ...


13

You should use whatever is more effective, comfortable, economical, etc. Some traditional methods of guitar will insist on using certain fingers for certain strings or related ideas like hitting repeated notes on one string by rotating through index-middle-ring, etc. There is often a good reason for this, but none of these work in all situations — ...


12

Using 2 instead of 3 allows your third finger to remain on the B-natural. Moving fingers from hovering over one key to another sets a player up for the possibility of more mistakes. While the stretch may be difficult, in the end, it will allow you to play the piece faster and more precisely.


11

Naturally, someone with small fingers won't be able to make the larger reaches in some pieces. Some stretches aren't reachable even by people with average size hands. Not every piece is for everyone. In particular there are some Bach, Beethoven and Rachmaninoff pieces requiring stretches of an octave or more (though I couldn't tell you which ones offhand)....


11

Using the 4-th alternatively with the 5-th on black keys is mainly done for the following reason: legato, especially on semitone steps of the scale. On the right hand, you have better control of the transition to and volume of the higher note of the octave which is the more important for the tone and the listener. You can do smoother scales that way. By ...


11

You should do whatever it takes to improve your practice and thus performance of the piece. In almost all cases, this means gratuitous writing and penciling of all accidentals and missed notes and fingerings. If it will ever help you, write it down. Your goal is not having something be easy to read or being clean: your goal is to play it perfectly. If that ...


11

There's no such thing as finger independence(read finger equality most of the time). All our fingers are different, and they're all connected too! For instance, would you ever expect any of your fingers to match your thumb in strength? Or take your index finger and press it to your palm. Your other fingers will move as well. The key to evenness and ...


11

First question: there is no rule, no "max limit" between notes. Sometimes you'll have to figure out yourself the way you spread the notes between your two hands (try the Bach chorales... you're a conductor with four voices, the relative heights of the notes are written relative to the singer's tessitura, not the keyboard player's hands). You'll also face ...


11

There is indeed a reason! The notes you play on a trumpet with a particular fingering come from the harmonic series, which is a series of tones based on the root, or fundamental frequency. The idea is that the harmonics (also called overtones) are whole-number multiples of the fundamental frequency. If the fundamental frequency of, say, your trumpet, is ...


11

The D7 chord is D (root), F♯ (major 3rd), A (perfect 5th), C (minor 7th). Any voicing that includes all four of those is correct. For example, the barre fingering is A–D–F♯–C, which is correct. Furthermore, the chord is in root position on a soprano or concert ukulele – meaning that the root is the lowest-pitched note – which is ideal for playing ...


11

Playing deeply between the black keys can be problematic. Suppose you want to play a C major scale; only white keys. Now you don't need to play any black keys, but you need to move your fingers over them. If you want to play this at larger speeds, this becomes a major obstacle. Another example is playing a large chord, say, B flat - E - G - C (C dominant ...


10

Piano fingerings are all about context. The notes which come before and after dictate the best fingering now. in the case that you're playing the 1st 4 notes of C major it depends what the 5th note is. if the note is the root C again, then the thumb is probably the worst finger you can use for playing F, if on the other hand you're continuing up the ...


10

Getting an even touch with alternating fingers might feel hard at first. However, try knocking the table with one finger and alternating two or more. You find you can tap a lot faster in the latter case. This speed reserve gives you more overhead and more control. On the other hand when you're playing two different notes you're mostly using different ...


10

This is a case where use of the pedal is needed. You use the pedal to hold the bass note and you change it when the bass is changing. In this excerpt at the beginning of every measure.


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