6

Out of the entire extended flute family, you've managed to name three that are about as far apart as they get! However, I'd still say that all woodwind fingerings are more similar than not. The fife is among the oldest flutes that still get some use, and the fingerings are identical to the tin whistle (a.k.a. pennywhistle, Irish whistle). It has six holes ...


4

I think the position of the fingering above and below the notes on the middle part is meant to indicate which hand plays the notes. The right hand G# F# 2 1 is fine (I don't know why another answer says it is "wrong!") if the following E F# E is the left hand 2 1 2 and then back to the right hand for the G# 2. However this logic about what the fingering ...


2

Try RH: 5&3, 2, 1, 3(over), 2, 1, 2. 1, 3 | 1 (under) ...


2

I first thought the lower fingerings are meant for the left hand. But it seems to be a typo (2 for G# is wrong!): You can play the G# with 3 (not 2) of the right hand and it will fit. (G#=3, F#=2, E=1)


2

This is a supplement to the previous answers. It's relatively easy to design an instrument so that in the first octave, you just open up an additional hole for each note in order to play the main scale of the instrument. This doesn't mean that this will work in the second octave. The way that the air flow and vibrations create the notes in these ...


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