24

This does not seem to be a typo, as evidenced by a clear D♭ in the bass on page 14 of the autograph manuscript: On page 14 of Kullak's "instructive edition" found here, the editor suggests fingering the chord 5–3–1 and rolling the chord to get all three pitches:


18

As a piano player of over 30 years, I can assure you that the pinky finger plays plenty of black keys. Either hand. Is it common ...? I want to say yes, but let's have some specific examples. it's less common to use pinky fingers to play major scales which originate on black keys (Bb, Eb, Ab) no pinky finger is used when playing the chromatic scale ...


13

You are overthinking this. You are free to use whichever fingers you like when playing a piece but obviously some fingerings will work better than others. What you need to do is to find a fingering that works for you and then try to always do that. Your "muscle memory" will simply work when you have practiced enough. If you find a passage where there are ...


10

All fingering is flexible! BUT, in a passage of 3rds, confined to the '5-finger position' you need a pretty good reason NOT to use 1-3, 2-4, 3-5. And 'I'm a beginner, and I find it hard to lift my 4th finger' isn't a good reason! It sounds as if you're playing an exercise that covers that problem already! Stick with it. Check with your teacher that ...


9

Fingerings are suggestions, but in exercises they might be the whole point When you learn a piece and you can do better with another fingering than the one on the piece, feel free to change it. Those are only suggestions. With an exercise, on the other hand, the point is to learn how to do things that are hard. Of course, if you play it with a different ...


9

We try to find a good fingering - that might mean 'good for YOU' considering your hand size - and stick to it. Not because it's a 'rule', but because it's effecient! You don't want to be hunting for each note every time you play the piece! Let your hands learn where to go, then your playing can become fluent.


9

When sight-reading, your long-term goal should be learning to read and play entire phrases of music, not individual notes. What fingering choice is practical for a specific note might be completely different depending on the phrase. For example: I don't think you would try to play the highlighted D note with any other finger than the thumb of your right ...


8

It's not so much making your thumb go underneath the fingers/palm as moving your whole hand. As soon as you've played the first C, the whole hand should have started to move right. By the time your middle finger hits the G, your thumb should be under that part of your palm. Whole hand then continues gently right, putting the thumb onto the next C. The thump ...


8

This answer is slightly modified from a forum post I once wrote elsewhere to explain in detail why the flute's "complicated" design is the way it is. It's long as anything, but it does answer the question, so why not? TL;DR included at the bottom. Let's start with the question about the B flat, and other alternate fingerings. There are some notes with ...


8

You are correct that the side-key trill is not a very good sound. There is really no way to produce a better trill for that one combo of notes. We all live with it.


7

Well there are a few things you can do to address this. I know its obvious but practise your scales and arpeggios. A lot of what you will sight read will include strings of consecutive notes from scales or arpeggiated chords. If you have practised these you will be surprised how quickly you "fall into" the correct fingering when you encounter those sorts ...


7

The arm places the thumb. Using just your arm and gravity - not your thumb's abductor, play your thumb down on C, then from the arm, lift up the arm and hand and leading with your elbow play the octave higher C. Regarding your wrist pain, a lot of times when a pianist crosses the thumb under the palm, they anticipate the next finger position and twist the ...


7

I won't talk about if it's transcribed correctly or not, because I don't know the piece... However, the part you've mentioned is actually 'only' a 10th. There are a lot of people who can reach a 10th in certain key signatures, me included: This 10th for example is very easy for me to reach, in the key of C I could even get it up to an 11th: If you can't ...


6

I assume you are using this fingering... Obviously, you are having trouble with the transition from finger 3 to 1, the G4 to C5 move. First thought: if playing the C major chord is considered easy, because so much beginner stuff is in C major, reconsider that all white key passages can be harder than a mix of black and white keys. Try playing this ...


6

The frets get very close together after the 10th fret so there is no way I would be able to use 3 fingers to play the open A chord as shown in your diagram. What I would do is use my middle finger (between index and ring finger) to "barre" the 3 strings and bend my finger up to avoid contact with the high e string. This is what I do when playing an A ...


6

Out of the entire extended flute family, you've managed to name three that are about as far apart as they get! However, I'd still say that all woodwind fingerings are more similar than not. The fife is among the oldest flutes that still get some use, and the fingerings are identical to the tin whistle (a.k.a. pennywhistle, Irish whistle). It has six holes ...


6

I think I read that you're not supposed to use thumb or pinky on black notes? Then you read incorrectly. It may be helpful for absolute beginners when they are first learning, but by the time a beginner can play more than "Twinkle twinkle little star" with one finger, they should have gone past that rule. For a very obvious counter-example, look at the ...


5

If you strum starting from the D string, you have a G chord (composed of the notes D-G-B-G). Since D is in the bass instead of G, this is an inversion of a G chord, specifically it is a G in second inversion. If you start from the open A string, you could call this a Gadd9 chord (composed of the notes A-D-G-B-G), or an even better name would probably be G/A (...


5

I'm treating 2 frets as one This is pretty close to the way people play double bass, but not 100% true. The most common technique people study (and the one I've been studying) is the one Franz Simandl wrote in his books New method for string bass. Basically he goes the "safe" way, assuming you are an average person, not a 2-meter-tall person with giant ...


5

The notation is quite clear; play the d flat left and the b flat right. Of course, often the division between the staves doesn’t say much about division between the hands, but in the case of Chopin (who was an excellent pianist himself) and in the case of this study, it is clear what is meant. But should you do it? You are always free to choose a different ...


5

From your question, and the subsequent edits, it is clear you have no idea how fingering on the piano works. I think you have the impression like many beginners do that piano playing starts from a fixed five finger position (like 'C-position' or 'G-position') and then veers out of that. In reality, in most piano-music (that is a bit more complicated than ...


5

The fingerings for almost all woodwind instruments are 'similar' in the sense that covering successive holes gives you a diatonic scale. For the chromatic notes in between, every woodwind instrument is different. Modern orchestral instruments have keys for the chromatic notes. The basic scales are simlilar, but there are many differences in detail. ...


4

Correct. The pressure for reaching the pa, dha, ni and sa of higher octave is much higher and the finger positions will be slightly different. Of course these are for advanced practice. Nevertheless you can also try


4

For black keys, 2-4 doesn't stretch too far. Compare it to the runs of parallel diminished fifths in the middle of Chopin's etude Op. 10 #3. (I bet you'll tire sooner from hearing that many parallel perfect fifths than from playing them.)


4

It is possible that your guitar(s) are not adjusted well and this is causing (or forcing) you to over do it to get things to work. But that isn't the only possible cause. Some chords can simply be difficult to finger properly, especially on the classical. I am helping a beginner student through this right now. Assuming your guitar is not the issue here ...


4

To be honest, the fingering you have pictured is the way I'd do it - with the index finger pulled back behind the other two, so that you aren't trying to get any two fingers exactly side-by-side: On really high frets though, I probably would just be just laying my finger across all the strings, as David Bowling suggests & as shown in Rockin Cowboy's ...


4

With enough practice, it's doable in that position, even if you don't have huge hands or very long fingers. You could practice it first in an even higher position, and then work your way down to the correct position. As a last resort, you could exchange fingers 1 and 2, i.e., use the second finger on the A string and the first on the high E string. This is ...


4

Scales fingerings are for scales. Which only get played in practice time and exams. They're designed to allow flowing movement of the hand/fingers. Pieces rarely contain scales - maybe partial scales, but even then, they won't necessarily start and finish as they do when playing 'proper' scales. So, although it's comforting at the moment to do what works ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible