27

It's probably a copy-paste mistake, someone used a notation program's automatic features to create the tab and didn't check if it can actually be played. Try playing it as: 10 x 11 11 10 x It's a Dmaj7 chord, by the way.


24

That is like asking a tennis player how they calculate the angles of their elbow, shoulder and wrist to hit the ball without looking at their racket. Maybe a somewhat unorthodox answer, but at this stage you should just do whatever it takes to play the right finger on the right note. It will soon crawl into muscle memory.


21

In the interest of keeping this post focused, I'll just address the specific question of... Why did Liszt put fingerings in his transcription of Beethoven's Ninth? First, it's important to establish whether the fingerings are given by Liszt, which they are. Here is the passage given in OP "sample 1" from the Neue Liszt-Ausgabe edition (1993) (mvmt ...


18

Try shifting your hand toward the fall board (i.e., away from your body). That will bring your thumb closer to the F#, allowing additional relaxation in the rest of your hand. So this: Rather than this:


11

Given that 1-2-3-4-5 isn't working for you because of the awkward A, then yes, your next best option is 2-3-1-2-3. The idea of fixed hand positions is generally a learning tool for beginners, and dispensed with by the time keys like F♯ are encountered. As a pianist gains experience, the general approach is "any fingering that works", where "...


10

On the western C-flute it's standard to use the pads on the tips of the fingers, in fact on the open-hole flutes played by a lot of professionals that's the only way possible. The second joint is used on bagpipes and a lot of ethnic flutes Irish whistles, bansuris, neys etc. Ian Anderson developed his style of playing without any musical training and it wasn'...


9

You are correct for the first measure. Use fingers 5 and 2 to hold the chord, and use your left-hand thumb for the Eb, F, and G. Then use your right-hand thumb for the Db. In the second measure play all but the final C with your right hand, and pick up the C with your left. There are three voices in total (or four, if you count the bass chords as two voices):...


8

The first valved horns, made by Heinrich Stölzel in 1814, had only 2 valves (arranged the same as modern 1st and 2nd). On one of these horns, if you play the notes of a C major scale from C4 to C5 (or from G3 to G4) (8 notes): four are open, two use the tone valve on its own, one uses the semitone valve on its own, and one uses both together. F major has ...


8

Make sure your fingers are curved not flat. Maybe they need to be further forward on the keys. Play down the Gmaj7 chord. Keep the notes held down, play a series of A notes with your 4th finger. You'll find it pretty tricky! Try not to lock your hand - relax! But it will teach you to lift that finger independently.


8

This notation suggests you use both hands. The engraver has shown this in at least two ways: By alternating stems-up notation versus stems-down, the suggestion is to play the stems-up notation with the right hand and the stems-down notation with the left. (Similarly, the higher quarter-note rests apply to the right hand, the lower ones to the left. Thus ...


7

When particular notes are literally under your fingers, there's no need to look. It's not like they've moved or disappeared! As a beginner, you can keep your hand over the five notes, and get used to the idea that one key is for one note. Later, you'll need to change that idea, as you will be stretching out your fingers, and moving your whole hand up or down,...


7

In order to play without looking at the keyboard, you need to have plenty of practice. However, you always have the option of looking at the keys. When it comes to placing thumb on D and going for F, considering only those two notes alone is not enough.(if we look at the practical scenario of playing by following a notation, there will be more than two notes!...


7

Your question, only considering two notes, D and F is a little unfortunate. You're hardly ever just going to be playing two notes, and that's it. More usually follow. Often some will precede! However, using that scenario, thumb (r.h.) is on D. What one uses for the F will be decided by what comes next, after that F. If the next note is higher, then maybe ...


7

Fingering questions are always about the context of what comes before and after the point in question. But having said that there certainly are fingering "norms." You can find them in various piano method books, like this one... https://imslp.org/wiki/Mastering_the_Scales_and_Arpeggios_(Cooke%2C_James_Francis) For your example of D to F the ...


7

"More for less!" - Walmart Fingerings are intended to help you position yourself correctly so that you don't have to go through overtly difficult changes or unnecessary hard work. But, sometimes too much can have the opposite effect; instead of giving you clarity, it obfuscates your reading. Imagine if every single note on the page had a finger. ...


6

The 'fixed position' idea works for beginners, as each of the five notes generally fall under each finger/thumb. It works particularly well when only white keys are involved - as is usual for learners. Moving on to mostly black keys, though - and you've already identified a problem! I suppose this is where knowing scales can help. When most of us learn the ...


6

There's a principle when marking up fingering for the benefit of less experienced players that you mark (a) where a non-obvious fingering is needed and (b) when a change of hand position is required. This piece pretty well follows that. The first marked chord might be assumed to take 1-5, particularly if the player didn't look ahead to the next one! Then ...


6

Here's a link to the Maurice Andre website which lists Maurice's opinions of the various piccolo trumpets he played over his career. The most common design for piccolo trumpets has four piston or rotary valves, with valve 4 introducing tubing with the combined length of 1+3. A less common design features three piston valves. Here's a picture of a beautiful ...


6

The sequence of Roman numerals below the score is an alternative assignment of notes to strings, i.e. you can't follow both at the same time. (The visual hint is that alternatives are often printed in an italic font.)


5

Your solutions are all quite usual for pianists and especially for organists playin chorals and fugues if legato playing is necessary. And mind: there are no no-goes and no ugly no noes. Everything goes when it is practicable and comfortable. You’ll find a lot of examples here: https://reader.digitale-sammlungen.de/de/fs1/object/display/...


5

Practice without looking at the fretboard or strings too much. I don't mean to never look, but make it a habit to often practice without looking, or looking very little. This will develop your ability to play without looking. It might seem impossible at first, but for me, it was actually easier to play once I stopped looking all the time. Here are some ...


5

As I read through, it reminded me of one reason I have a mirror (8'x4') on the wall in my studio. Let's be honest, there are 6 strings, and the outside ones (the two Es) are easy to find. Leaving 4. With your plucking hand, presumably holding a pick, and resting just behind the bridge, you pluck a correct string. Let's say it's the G string, and you've ...


5

If you are picking with a plectrum, you often need to keep your right hand resting (very gently) on the strings you're not playing, so you can mute them. With this in mind, you'll almost always be touching at least one of the strings anyway, which gives you a good reference point. If you're fingerpicking, then you will typically have each finger 'assigned' ...


5

I agree that your fingering looks ideal for both left and right hands. In light of your question about the "red-fingered" notes, here is some discussion of considerations that go into choosing a fingering. Since you specifically mentioned a thumb-turn, here's a proposed fingering. X:0 T:Happy Birthday excerpt M:none K:C L:1/4 G/2G/2 g e c B A s: 1 ...


5

When your thumb is pressing D, then see next note is F, do you memorise the pattern that D and F is skipping one finger and in this case the middle finger to press F? Or do you look at the key F and press it? Well, when it comes to which finger to use, you have five options: you can press it with your thumb, your index finger, your middle finger, your ring ...


5

Are you sure this is not a typo? One way to play such chord is to play the bass note with your right hand, by tapping. Another possibility is to change fingering to xx0675


5

The score shown in the question appears to be the one edited by Hermann Keller, and which can be found on IMSLP. The fingering suggested in the score is based on the idea that the right-hand plays the upper staff notes, and the left-hand plays the lower staff notes. However, the primary issue with Bach is maintaining the integrity of the individual voices. ...


5

This is where the middle pedal comes out to play. Sostenuto will hold the semibreves, leaving your hands free for everything else. The D♭ itself - I'd be playing that with rh thumb, in order to play the lh A♭ and E♭ at the beginning of bar 13. Hold those with the sostenuto, freeing lh for the rest of the bar. No middle pedal? Then the sustain will do at a ...


5

First of all, this is not a very good piece of music. It's just a dry and boring transcription of the main theme played at a slow tempo. It's not worth spending more energy worrying about technique than the arranger spent writing it. That being said, many people are overly obsessed with the sostenuto (middle) pedal, and with doing weird hand gymnastics to ...


5

Here are three options, in order of ease I had with them. Your mileage may vary. Option #1: pairs Play in pairs: i.e., three groups of two. Given that the main problem is getting from the first dyad to the second, this is the first option to try. It allows you to keep the same finger on G for both dyads, making speed and accuracy much easier. X: 1 T: Option #...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible