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2

Depending on the range of the tenor line, you might be able to get away with just overriding the fingering staff padding for the tenor voice: alto = { \new Voice { \voiceOne b4_3 cs'_2 d'_1 a_3 | } } tenor = { \new Voice { \voiceTwo \override Voice.Fingering.staff-padding = #3 %%% g4-5 g-...


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In addition to the other answers, it's worth addressing the issue of why different hands play the middle C. After all, it would be straightforward to play all middle Cs with the right hand, reserving the left hand for only the B. The reason for the switch is related to musical phrasing. The E-D-C and C-B-C each can be treated as a single gesture. The E-D-C &...


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Am I headed down the path of bad fingering? No. The fingerings presented are fine, and appropriate considerations have been made in constructing them. Here are some additional ideas toward this or some future exercise. The "canonical" fingerings for close-position triads in all keys are: 1) root position = RH: 1-3-5; LH: 5-3-1; first inversion = ...


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This article http://www.donaldsauter.com/guitar-fingering-notation.htm uses term "performance indication". I don't believe it's widely used, but seems accurate.


1

I see nothing wrong with your fingering. Allowing it's comfortable for you, committing the fingering to memory seems fine. That said, here is my own preferred fingering. Try it out and see if you want to adopt any or all of it. 5-2-4 1-5-1 4-5-4 3-1-4 1-4-2 1-2-5 4-2-1 This fingering depends on a very quick release of finger 5 that allows the ...


3

It is probably a good idea to get confident with one fingering first. As you progress you can learn other variants. Your fingering of the G chord is for example practical, if you change from a G to a Gmaj7, you only need to lift the ring finger. If a song has a change from G to G6, the 3-finger-variant would allow you to lift only one finger to make the ...


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Upper stave = r.h., lower stave = l.h. also the fingerings, even the voicing is distributed corresponding to hands and staves. But you may always feel free to find your own solution, if you think it‘s more comfortable and better convenient.


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"Plus, my version of the score doesn't have numbers." Well, an obvious good first move would be to get a version that DOES have fingerings! Like the one you showed us an excerpt of. Bach didn't write anything in this piece (BWV 914) that COULDN'T be played by two hands, but his interweaving musical lines often needed some 'ducking and diving' to ...


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I don't see a need to pick some different music for an "exercise." I see a need for mindfulness! I think you need to pay more attention to what you're doing, and in order to do that you'll need to slow down. It's not wasting time, it's achieving mindfulness. When you're playing slow enough to pay attention to what you're doing, you'll be able to ...


5

The score shown in the question appears to be the one edited by Hermann Keller, and which can be found on IMSLP. The fingering suggested in the score is based on the idea that the right-hand plays the upper staff notes, and the left-hand plays the lower staff notes. However, the primary issue with Bach is maintaining the integrity of the individual voices. ...


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The principle I use for the left-hand blues scales is to break each scale into two segments and use one of the finger patterns 4321 31 or 421 321. The beginning and end of each finger pattern does not necessarily correspond to the beginning and end of the scale. Sometimes it works best to start in the middle of a fingering pattern. See also the linked ...


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Theres no way youd be able to play VP the same way you would using a real piano, since youd be using a computer keyboard instead but at the same time it isnt also that hard to play vp (if u get what Im saying- ;-;.) To play vp, your hands need to be quick, and be able to memorize which "key" to press sometimes by memory. I suggest you try vp sheets ...


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You can play it using a sweep technique with a thumb finger or using all other fingers on the first strings. Or you can play it with a pick. 5/5 can be played with one or two left hand fingers.


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Fingering of one particular moment depends on what comes before and after. There isn't one correct fingering. So, you need to have a rationale for your fingering choices. I did this as my first thought... Generally you want to make fingering changes to place new fingers on adjacent keys or substitute new fingers on one key, because once a finger is down on ...


1

I'd be more inclined to use 4-2 for the E and G♯, setting the hand up nicely for 3-1 on A and C. 3-1 on E and G♯ isn't ridiculous - yes you'd have to move your hand forward, but that's legitimate piano technique. But in this context it seems clumsy.


2

UPDATE: Now that the example is posted in the OP: I suggest using 5-3 for the E-G#. It will be more comfortable, and it will prepare the hand for the A-C that follows. To play E and G# with left-hand fingers 3 and 1, the correct technique is to slide your hand toward the back end of the keys, as you're doing. However, this is an odd fingering to use, ...


3

Dont be afraid to use the entire key to play things, it is IMPOSSIBLE to stay on the edge for everything BECAUSE BLACK NOTES EXIST If you avoid sliding into the key, you run into terrible positions like this: Isn't that disgusting? My entire hand feels contorted and I am just begging for carpal tunnel syndrome. Instead, compare the beauty of a good hand ...


2

There are many possibilities, depending on what are your goals (articulation, speed, ...?) For most people, when changing strings downwards (so as in the second measure in your example) it's more convenient to change fingers towards the thumb. E.g. you play the last note on first string in the first measure with m and then the first note in the second ...


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