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When you start playing the violin the first finger pattern you usually learn is a pattern where there is: a whole step (a major second) from open string to the first finger, a whole step from first finger to second finger, a half step (a minor second) from second finger to third finger, and if you include the fourth finger a whole step from third to fourth ...


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As already stated in other answers, it’s situational and subjective. One way I find it useful to play open notes is on bass strings, when I want to allow them to sustain and slowly decay while I progress with the melody on treble strings an octave or two higher. Additionally, I sometimes play open treble strings in a similar way. Generally it’s in lower ...


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This is extremely situation dependent. Are you playing a scale run up in the 5th position, or some type of arpeggiated chord pattern in the open string position? Depending on your answer I think the sensible thing to do is play whatever is closest to the other notes in the pattern and creates continuity of sound in the passage. If your left hand has to ...


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Depending on several factors. As already noted, the sound of an open string is quite different from fretted strings. Were it a short note, amongst many other short notes, it would not sound out of place, played by someone who knew what to do. As a long note, it can work, although vibrato or bending , as previously stated, are usually out of the remit. But, ...


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This depends on a particular situation. Open string sounds brighter (the harmonics are louder) than the fretted notes so it's a question of which sound connects better with the other notes. There is no objective answer. Also you can't bend or vibrate an open string, at least not with the regular techniques. Your remark on muting is valid as well. Concerning ...


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To play as notated, with the double-notes handled entirely by the right hand, I use this fingering: measure 7: 14-25 measure 8: 13-25 measure 9: 14-25 measure 10: 13-25 measure 11: 13-25 or 12-25 measure 12: 13-25 However, as an alternative, the passage flows quite comfortably by splitting the inner voice between the two hands. In each measure, the right ...


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The reason is about professional play of similar instruments of different sizes (and therefore pitches). Think of "C" as a finger position: you read a C, you put your fingers in that position. If you pick up a B-flat instrument or whatever, then the same finger position will play a B-flat. It's up to the COMPOSER to figure out the right ...


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Pretty sure this is a dupe, but - the clarinet, like several other instruments, is a transposing instrument. Yours makes the sound a whole tone lower than the music says. So when you see and play a C note, a B♭ comes out. There are other clarinets, but the 'B♭' is the most common. You'll have to either learn to play by transposing up a tone from your music, (...


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First, let's talk about Carnatic Music. In Carnatic Music, there is a scale, called a raga. A raga is a combination of notes that make up a scale in Classical Music. Some ragas have all 7 notes of the scale, and a lot of them don't have all of the notes. There are a total of 72 melakarta ragas. Melakarta ragas are the ragas that have all 7 notes of the scale....


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