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2

When you practice scales, you should also practice arpeggios. Practice 4 octave arpeggios as 16th notes. For most hands, 1-2-3 is better because you should be moving your thumb under while playing the 3, just as you do with scales.


3

You're not doing anything fundamentally wrong. I use a similar fingering for this passage: 1-2-3. The key element to making it sound like 5+1 rather than 3+3 is making sure you don't "fall" onto your thumb on the fourth note of the 5-tuplet. The hand shift to the biggest, heaviest finger will tend to put an accent on that note. So practice slowly, ...


5

Most would play it as a 'power chord', using index on the A string, and ring and pinky on the other two. It's only like a basic barre E shape , but moved over to the next strings. If that doesn't work for you, then try index on A string, and ring flattened over the other higher strings. It does look strange, to a beginner, but a lot of us will use that as a ...


3

Your example and a few others showing multiple sets of fingerings. Your example... ...shows fingering alternatives. Sometimes you see this in technique manuals... ...in that example the "German, English, French" labels help show the stacked up numbers are rows of alternate fingerings. Also, multiple sets can be shows not so much as alternate ...


2

Clearly, they're options. The idea of using the same finger to play a black key and the adjacent white key either up or down, is one technique that piano players have developed and particularly here, where the two notes are marked as slurred, it's an easy option. Not necessarily a necessity, as there's enough fingers left using even the top fingering, to ...


6

It means that either is a possibility, and you can choose whichever best fits your technique and musical intention.


3

Working out your optimum fingering is always going to be part of the practice regime. Couple of points that crop up, referencing this particular piece. The thumb is usually the most mobile of all the digits - it'll stretch further left and right than the others (although its length gives it other disadvantages). So, it would follow that using it on C as a ...


8

Especially when sight-reading, it's helpful to look ahead and plan your fingering. In this case, with such a short piece, it's easy to see that the B is the lowest note and G is the highest. (So we can't pick any one hand position that gives one note to each finger. We'll have to either do some stretching, or move our hand at some point.) We can also notice ...


0

My friend assist me to defined those Lilybin lines, in order to add additional grafical to wood-wind diagram: \version "2.22.1" % LilyBin #(define-markup-command (woodwind-diagram-x layout props instrument user-draw-commands) (symbol? list?) #:properties ((upper-hole1 #f) (size 1) (thickness 0.1) ...


4

You can create new patterns using Scheme: Creating new diagrams is possible, although this will require Scheme ability and may not be accessible to all users. The patterns for the diagrams are in ‘scm/define-woodwind-diagrams.scm’ and ‘scm/display-woodwind-diagrams.scm’. Source: https://lilypond.org/doc/v2.18/Documentation/source/Documentation/notation/...


1

You COULD hop the 4th finger directly from C to F♯. But the finger change and implied change of hand position makes hitting the F♯ much more secure. This is what the finger change is for in this case, not to facilitate a legato. Your approximation in the question shows a FAR too big gap after the slurs. The gap will be minimal. The slur is more about ...


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