New answers tagged

1

There is no convention. This seems to be a choral setting and the beams are referring to the 4 voices SATB. But you can play it the way you want. As other say: it depends of the context (what comes next?)


1

You could do either. The preferred method is going to depend on what comes next - there's no particular rule. In some scores the upper three notes will be on a single stem (even when divided between staves) - in that case you can assume they're all played by the right hand. The same is true when the two lower staff notes are on a single stem. But in what ...


3

As with so many things in music, it depends on the context. You can play this either way: with three voices in the right hand and one in the left hand, or with two voices in either hand. Your decision would likely be up to what chords occur before and after this one. If all of the surrounding chords are easier to play with three voices in the right hand and ...


1

The first fingering looks pretty good to me. The second one looks a bit awkward towards the end of the passage (between the G and A). You could also try this: using the second fingering, at the A, use 1,2,1,2 (going to the G with your 2nd finger). See what you think.


-1

What do you have against the easy Dm?


2

I've usually tended to finger all strings for both chords, so what I suggest is barre 3rd fret with index, and use ring and pinky on strings 5 and 4 for Gm. There's no need to actually play any more than the top four, though. Then slide the barre up to fret 5, moving ring and pinky across to strings 4 and 3, leaving middle to drop onto the 2nd string. The ...


4

Actually the Dm (xx7765) are just the top 4 strings of a full barred Dm chord (557765), and the Gm is the same for the full figure (355333). Use the 3rd finger to fret that 'G' note on the 4th string, 5th fret. To transition to Dm, keep the barre and the 3rd finger, slide it 2 frets up the fretboard, and then add the 2nd finger on the 2nd string and the ...


1

I'm a self-taught pianist, too. And I am using a book that is more than 100 years old, namely James Francis Cook's Mastering the Scales and Arpeggios. Thousands of students have used this book in order to prepare for the examinations through the decades. It also contains an ingenious method for developing the greatest possible velocity of playing scales by ...


0

I most commonly see fingerings for double-stops placed above or below the staff (or even the finger for the top note above and the finger for the lower note below the staff), as in the last pair shown here: For 3- and 4-note chords such a stacked fingering tends to disrupt staff spacing, so I often see fingerings stuffed next to the chord in the staff ...


Top 50 recent answers are included