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1

"Multiple notes at a same time, usually dissonant" are called multiphonics. I imagine they'd be hard to serialise for recorders due to the many variations out there, but for saxophone they have been recorded by John Gross (in his "Multiphonics for the Saxophone" book) and are available from some online resources too. Likewise, they are ...


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This week’s video from Sarah Jeffery on the Team Recorder channel covers playing ‘Austro’ by Giorgio Tedde, which calls for some unconventional fingerings. The video is at , the section on unconventional fingering starts at about 06:00. I’m sure there are many other contemporary recorder pieces and techniques that call for non-...


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Just to put a coda to this question, a year later… I ended up not getting hold of a bass until we were actually on set for the first day of shooting. By the time actor/camera rehearsals were completed & they were ready to roll, I'd developed enough of a feel for it that it was actually no great effort. We shot the same scene for a week - by which time I ...


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On the western C-flute it's standard to use the pads on the tips of the fingers, in fact on the open-hole flutes played by a lot of professionals that's the only way possible. The second joint is used on bagpipes and a lot of ethnic flutes Irish whistles, bansuris, neys etc. Ian Anderson developed his style of playing without any musical training and it wasn'...


2

Hands playing automatically is called "muscle memory", in fact this is a misnomer because muscles don't have a memory - not this sort of memory anyway. The part of the brain called the cerebellum memorises motor actions. This takes away a load from the conscious parts of our brain. https://www.thoughtco.com/anatomy-of-the-brain-cerebellum-373216 ...


1

Unconscious means that you are able to play the motifs, figurations, passages like you handle chords, triads, arpeggios and scales and ornaments (mordents, turn-arounds and trills) in classical music and riffs and licks in pop and jazz. This means you have to analyze the form, the harmony, the chords, the chordprogression, and you must have the entire ...


2

If you are still messing up scales, then they're not in your sub (or even un) conscious yet. When was the last time you were running, and thought ' does my heel or toe need to hit the ground first?' Chances are, if you did think that, you'd probably fall over... Running has reached the stage where it's at least subconscious, so it's not necessary to analyse ...


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It depends on whether your goal is improv or classical recital performance. Your description of "automatic playing" is featured as a goal in Pepe Romero's book on Classical Guitar technique. From his father he learned that a piece of music should be memorized, not only the notes but the feeling of playing every note, chord, etc. To the point ...


1

'Eye to fingers' playing - barely hitting the brain - is a very useful accomplishment. As is the development of muscle memory for tricky patterns and passages. But if it's letting you down on a particular piece, yes you'll need to backtrack and sort it out.


3

Because, hopefully, you are already fluent at playing a F major scale. No need to train your fingers into another pattern when the same notes are required. Not sure why the book doesn't follow the same principle in the LH.


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Often, you actually want to use fingering considered awkward in Euro-Classical tradition. The reason for this is getting a strong attack so as to 'convey' stronger rhythm. There is a tradeoff in doing finger gymnastics to properly render a Chopin melody: you get a beautiful legato line, but that is all; you won't get a desirable big sound, you won't get ...


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I would use RH only. You need preparation of finger 5 playing the A-sharp. This can be done by 5 hovering over G-sharp when 2 plays B. Can get better preparation by angling the hand (see photo) and then 3 or 4 depending on what’s next. I’d favour 4 because it’s less physically possible to play legato with 4 than 3, to detach from the high A-sharp.


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That's just how the hand works, and you should not apply force to change it! The solution for reaching the required positions is to rotate the hand away a bit from a perfectly perpendicular position. Observe how violin players do it, and do it a bit like that. (Violin has no frets and therefore precise positioning is essential). Here's an answer I gave to a ...


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If your hand is curled too much then no, you won't be able to spread your fingers. Quick test, no guitar required - hold your hand up vertically in front of your face, fingers & thumb straight up, palm facing you. Spread your fingers. Oppose your thumb as though you were going to grip something [like a guitar neck], then start to bend your fingers, ...


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