2

Most times, yes, Em open is played with just the two notes fretted on the A and D strings, 2nd fret. However - E minor is made up from just three notes - E G and B. They could be played as a three string chord on guitar, or, could be doubled up or even tripled - which is what happens to the E notes in the chord you know. But - by losing the top E and ...


2

That’s an Em chord. Any chord that has the notes E, G, B is an E minor chord, and if E is the lowest note, its chord symbol is ”Em”. (If, say, G was the lowest note, it would be a so-called inversion and the chord symbol would be ”Em/G”.) The sounding notes at the start are E, G, B and G as the high melody note. E string open (0) : E (lowest note, bass ...


2

I suspect you're confusing chord-shapes with chords. There may be a hundred way to play Em on the guitar. What they all have in common is the notes E,G and B. The notes may be this way up or that; they may be arpegiated or simultaneous; they may all be present or just two of them; they may be doubled or trebled. It makes no difference. In all case it is ...


1

An E min chord is just the notes (E, G, B) with possible repeated notes. There must be a dozen ways to play this, and every other chord out there, on the guitar. So, when judging what a chord is try to use the formula. Use the major scale degrees. Major scale degrees = (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7) or (1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13). Major chord = (1, 3, 5) Minor ...


1

That's an E minor chord at the start. I don't think the contents of chords are any different in fingerstyling (though the most often used voicings very well could be). The played notes at the very start, from bottom to top, are E-G-B-G: a match for an E minor chord. The next two notes you need to play are F♯ and E. (Treat the F♯ as a passing ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible