65

Per a suggestion, I am converting my comment into an answer. WARNING: math ahead (uh-oh, it looks like Music.SE doesn't support MathJAX -- I am going to go ahead and post the TeX code anyway and try to explain it in plain english along the way. I also added a meta request to see if we can't fix the MathJAX problem.) Discounting the inharmonicity due to ...


21

The reason for the difference in sound is that the release of the string from the pick is faster than with fingers, which means that fewer of the upper harmonics are damped as the string is released. This gives the pick a brighter sound than the fingers.


17

The difference is caused by the different shape of the plucking implement. One easy way to verify this at home is to take your pick (same material and thickness), and pluck the strings with the back of the pick or the side of the pick. The tone will be different because of the different profile of the pick (pointed versus rounded). Also, the thickness of ...


13

As an addition to the other answers, here's the frequency spectrum of an open low E string of an electric guitar (a Squier strat with a bridge humbucker), strummed with the fleshy part of the finger, plucked with a fingernail, and picked with a plectrum (a Dunlop Delrin-500 .71mm). I played each note a couple of times and then selected one that sounded ...


8

Your priorities should be (1) finding a decent teacher and taking lessons every other week or so, and (2) locating a music store or repair shop in your neighborhood so you can get you guitar fixed if it breaks again. You don't want to wait 6 years again to start over. Also, learn to take care of your guitar. If you are lucky you might find that your ...


8

This is an interesting question. Before finishing the entire description I would have opted for your technique is not up to par and you are getting fatigued. However, you point out that this does not bother you at home and that it starts right away on stage (after the first pinch). If this is solely a performance anxiety issue it's probably psychological. ...


7

It is clear that some keys will have many open string notes in them. You will find that much classical guitar music is written in such keys. This is due to the desire to have open string resonances contribute to the volume of the instrument. However on the electric this is not as much of an issue. In fact on an electric open strings can generate unwanted ...


5

Barre chords are transpositions of open chords; the root note stays on the same string: An open E chord has the root on the 6th string, and so does any E-shape barre chord. An open A chord has the root on the 5th string, and so does any A-shape barre chord. An open D chord has the root on the 4th string, and so does any D-shape barre chord. Any ...


5

If the time signature is 4/4, there are always 4 beats in every bar. But that doesn't have necessarily anything to do with how many "actions" you perform per bar, i.e. how many times you pick/finger a string or anything. How many "actions per bar" you do depends on the rhythm pattern and how you realize it, and there are any number of different rhythms and ...


3

Yes - alternate your fingers. Picking hand fingers are usually indicated with initials for the Spanish names of the fingers, because fingerstyle guitar originated in Spain. You've got P (pulgar: thumb), I (indice: index), M (medio: middle), and A (anular: the ring finger). For most passages you use an alternating i-m or m-i fingering. If the line ...


3

its good to have ambitions, and "heroes" but take care of the walking before you run. I would seek out a recommended teacher and start there. Its a pretty lousy teacher who cannot guide a student through fixing a break in their instrument either through repair advice or a loan of an instrument.


3

Most important is to mute the low strings while playing melody on the high ones. This is by far best done with the thumb of the picking hand. When playing on the A-string, I have it standing upright on the E-string; when playing on the D-string, upright on the A-string but also touching the E-string; when playing on the treble strings, the thumb lies flat ...


3

The finger pad will always likely produce a dull tone. The important thing is to be able to control the tone and reliably reproduce the same sound, tone and volume, each time you attack. I use a technique where I touch the edge of my finger pad to the string and let the string glide off the pad, onto the nail and then launch off the nail like a slide (I ...


3

In addition to Your Uncle Bob's very clear answer. There isn't really 'you are supposed to...'. The bass note is often the root, and yes, played with thumb. Main reasons - thumb is just where it needs to be, and the sound is good for a bass note. Fingers can and do go where necessary. That's not always the case then of index here, ring there etc. A lot of ...


3

Q: What bass string to use? A: Use the string that has the note you want to play as the lowest note. If you want to play the chord's root note as the lowest note, then use the string that has the root note. If you want to play some other note as the bass note, then use whatever string has that note. The bass note and the root note of the chord are not ...


3

It could be. And it could be doubled to play twice in a bar, the second time with a 5th of the chord instead of the 'base' note. It depends on what the song sounds better with, and how you want to play it anyway. It could be played as thumb on beat 1, 3 fingers simultaneously on beat 2, then repeated for the 2nd half of the bar. Don't get too hung up on '...


3

It's up to you! If you're playing some song fingerpicking style, then you're the one making up the fingerpicked part anyway. Therefore, you can do it as fast or as slow as you want. You could play the whole thing twice per bar, once per bar, four times per bar, et cetera. If you're the one making up your part, why worry about how it's "supposed" to be ...


2

"nice" is a bit subjective. Some like soft attack, others like a sharp attack... But if you like the sound your thumb and ring finger make look at what you do with them that is different. Are you picking or strumming at a different angle, are you using less or more pressure, is the speed the same, etc? Try changing these factors.


2

If you're looking to practice right hand (or picking hand) patterns there is a work in the classical guitar repertoire, La Tecnica Degli Arpeggi, Guglielmo Papararo. It is comprised of just about every possible fingering pattern played on the open string. Of course if you tune your guitar to a open tuning you'll be fingering some chord other than an E ...


2

In the folk picking style Knopfler is playing simple arpeggios. In the "piano" style, his thumb is acting like the left hand of a piano player who is pounding out octaves, thirds and fifths in walking bass lines while his other fingers are playing stacked chords with melodic fills, like the right hand of a piano player. Now the thumb can only play one ...


2

There are many many different picking patterns to fingerstyle, and the 'rule' (of thumb!) on the bottom strings is only a basic guideline. One reason for that is the sound on the lower strings, using thumb: it gives a softer bass pattern. However, some patterns will need all fingers (yes, I know lots of people frown at using pinky, but it's there if needed)...


2

you can always do what you think it feels more natural (not only in guitar playing)! and if it is more comfortable or natural to you to pluck the D or A string with the index -do it! It won't harm later when you want to change it with the thumb. Imagine the mobility and flexibility a piano player needs with fingering. Probably a professional guitar ...


2

Have a closer look at the players that play solos/melodies exclusively with fingers. Mark Knopfler and Derek Trucks would be good examples. They both alternate between thumb and index a lot with other fingers joining in when handy. Mark Knopfler in particular has an interesting technique where he the alternate plucks are more like a snaps where the string ...


2

Personally, if you're just looking for beginner PERCUSSIVE techniques (not beginner finger-style or anything else.), I would honestly recommend Rylynn by Mr. McKee. I started learning that for music school auditions a few years ago when I had absolutely 0 knowledge about percussion in guitar, and I think it was a great learning experience. For me, I have ...


2

"have difficulty preforming many difficult things like a thumb slap and even some chords I cant stretch to and play cleanly" Seems to me working on your weak spots is always a good place to start. However if you can't do those things while not fingerpicking, e.g. While using a pick,there is no way you'll be able to do it while adding more complexity in your ...


2

Good answers, but they're either incomplete or very technical. The simple answer is that the shape and stiffness of your finger is different from the shape and stiffness of the pick. For this description, let's presume that the pick is an infinitely hard single point that releases the string instantaneously. In reality, a pick is an edge, like a tiny violin ...


2

Once a song is written, and most likely recorded, that becomes the 'blueprint' - the original - the definitive- version. Others, who copy it, may decide to change notes (or even are blissfully unaware that they've done that), so that it isn't exactly like the original. Most tmes, it's just a variation on a couple or a few notes, occasionally it's blatantly ...


2

Another factor not yet mentioned is the direction the string is traveling as it leaves the plucking appendage or implement. Guitar strings support two primary modes of vibration--parallel to the body and perpendicular to it--and the resonant frequency in these modes will be influenced differently by the shape of the contact points on the nut, frets, and ...


2

In Guitar Pro (a common tablature reading/writing software), you can achieve this P symbol by selecting the note/chord and selecting the pop option in the editor: If I were to hazard a guess, I would say that the tab author probably wants to indicate that at this point you need to lightly slap the lower (or lowest) string with your thumb as you play. This ...


2

Playing in front of an audience has almost nothing in common with playing at home with family and friends, so stage fright sets in and you tense up. Not only that, but your hyper- critical ears kick in and you hear things about your own playing that you never noticed before and often it throws your concentration off. It feels somewhat traumatic when it's ...


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