5

Both, and everything in between. Each person will develop their own angle, and will vary that depending what sound they want. And again, depending on whether it's fingers or fingernails (and the way they're shaped). The 90 degree will give most force, so loudest, and clearest, but sometimes the tone and volume need to change, so more of an angled brushing ...


5

I don't think I can pinpoint a single reason, but I can add some ideas. I started learning classical guitar, and then moved off to other pastures. Most of the pieces I played made use of just 4 fingers, skipping the pinky. In general, you have the thumb picking the low strings and the other 3 arpeggiating the high strings. In this sense, there is no need to ...


5

In my opinion, if you're playing it as fast as you want and your hand does not hurt, then it's absolutely okay. (I think that when I played this piece (a couple of years ago), I actually used only one finger for the B string, most probably m. Alternating p-m-p-m-... is quite natural.) Alternating two (or more) fingers is very good if you want to play some ...


4

Sitting waiting, bored. Start tapping fingers on the table. Most people seem to start with pinky and work towards index. It seems to be a natural direction. So M comes before I. If that's not you, reader, then play I, then M ! Having said that, it's worth working on making exactly the same sound with each and every finger, and being able to play smoothly ...


4

I don't see how it is really discouraged. The Spanish school even has a name for the right hand pinky, Nuno. The classic Primary, Index, Middle and Anular, can be extended to include the pinky (Nuno) as well (For P-I-M-A-N). My teacher taught me that it is good to train the pinky as it aids with the learning of the rasgeudo and for a world class strum with ...


3

I have the same thing with my ring and pinky. for guitar, search the spider exercise. it helps a little with the separation but not with the stretch. The spider walk exercise is the link below: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=spider+walk+guitar


3

Not being a medical expert, not seeing your fingers, it's impossible to tell. Bm - I think everyone plays that using pinky, and Asus is often played with pinky too. Stick with what you have, and get by with that. Take a leaf out of Django's book, and adapt. Good luck.


3

It should not rest anywhere. I am well aware that many players "anchor" the right hand (picking hand) both in finger style and pick style playing but this is unnecessary and will ultimately lead to the development of a handicap in terms of lost freedom of movement. Perhaps you could clarify which "finger style" you are trying to learn. In classical the ...


3

Percussive guitarist Mike Dawes talks over his pickup configuration in a Premier Guitar interview available on YouTube. He has four pickups and internal mics. Overview of his pickups starts at 10:40 Magnetic sound hole pickup - combines with piezo for primary sound Piezo under the bridge plate (not under saddle) - combines with sound hole for primary sound ...


3

I suspect the time gap when changing chords has little to do with picking - after all, it's the responibilty of the fretting hand! Only concerning that aspect - practise hammering-on the chord shapes - all, not just C and G. Finger a chord shape, play it, then lift off around a quarter of an inch, then simultaneously slam all fretting fingers onto the ...


2

Most times, yes, Em open is played with just the two notes fretted on the A and D strings, 2nd fret. However - E minor is made up from just three notes - E G and B. They could be played as a three string chord on guitar, or, could be doubled up or even tripled - which is what happens to the E notes in the chord you know. But - by losing the top E and ...


2

That’s an Em chord. Any chord that has the notes E, G, B is an E minor chord, and if E is the lowest note, its chord symbol is ”Em”. (If, say, G was the lowest note, it would be a so-called inversion and the chord symbol would be ”Em/G”.) The sounding notes at the start are E, G, B and G as the high melody note. E string open (0) : E (lowest note, bass ...


2

I suspect you're confusing chord-shapes with chords. There may be a hundred way to play Em on the guitar. What they all have in common is the notes E,G and B. The notes may be this way up or that; they may be arpegiated or simultaneous; they may all be present or just two of them; they may be doubled or trebled. It makes no difference. In all case it is ...


2

Strictly speaking, it goes wherever you need it to go. It may be 'anchored' on the guitar top, or a string, but generally, it'll be hovering like the rest, in suspension over the strings, ready to be used. There's nothing wrong with it being used - not all the time - but whenever needed. Some players don't use it, some sites say don't use it, others use it ...


2

Reliability is one important factor. In other words, you generally want to have a technique that can be reliably learned and used by everyone. Only a small minority of people would be able to learn to use the pinky effectively and reliably, so it makes sense to leave that out, and focus on what works a lot better for everyone. Of course, if you are the ...


2

Not at all (if you don't have a ultra-small hand). My advice would be to play it just as it is written. The reason is that as you play more and more, your hand will be progressively more able to stretch, so after some time, you will be absolutely OK with it. On top of that, stretches like this just occur quite frequently on the guitar (they often arise ...


2

You are asking for more than one thing here. The first is how to improve your finger style technique and the second is how to improvise finger style. As for the first the best way is to work on some classic right hand exercises to improve technique and make your right hand comfortable with different picking patterns. I do not know if there are any special ...


2

One can pick using any number of right hand patterns. For really fast tremolo it is usually better to alternate because it makes no sense to think that one can use the same finger twice at a high speed. Of course there are exceptions to every rule. I would request that you post a picture of the sheet music so we can see what you are doing. It is diffcult ...


1

For expressiveness, whatever gets you the tone you want. However picking at 45 degrees has some definite disadvantages mechanically. Lower volume. If you're not plucking the string cleanly, it's not going to be as loud. Possible string noise as your finger skids along the string slightly. With your finger more "side-on" instead of "flat-on&...


1

Take a good look at the stems on the notes. Some point upwards, some downwards. In each bar, there are two dotted crotchets. Bars 1,2 and 4 they all have stems down, and bar 3, stems up.Count them and it works out right - 2 x 1 and a half = 3. Now look at the other notes, including the notes written on top of each other. They all amount to 3 crotchets per ...


1

In the first Am chord, all except the lowest A note are quarter notes, of which there are 3 in each measure in a 3/4 time signature. This probably makes sense to you if we for now ignore that low A and the dotted E (the 2 on the D string in tab). The trick is the dotted A note in the first chord, which has the length of 1.5 quarter note. Looking at the ...


1

Study harmony, then counterpoint. Partimento is also a good training.


1

The first thing to consider is the fact that you have several options to choose from and you'll need to choose the one that suits your interest best. Probably the first option to consider is an instructor or mentor that you can freely ask questions and will freely pass along practice tips and guidance. Another option is to find instruction sites that ...


1

As written it's a somewhat difficult passage. The performance is much clearer when you consider the standard notation: the A on the first string has to be held until you hit the B note tabbed on the sixth string later in the measure. Since the B is two frets higher than the A, you'd need to do the slide with your ring finger, then reach a bit with the ...


1

There is a crucial piece of information missing from this TAB. What fingering is suggested for this? If you slide using the ring finger (or pinky) your index will be free to grab the 2nd fret and should not be a problem. Whether or not that seems reasonable depends on the notes before the 2 you've shown. If you really want help please post the entire line ...


1

I am not sure what rules you are finding or discovering. Please take lessons for a while. It is simply not true that (i, m) will sound different than (m, i). They should not, that's what diligent practicing is for. Also, notes on the same string do not need to be played (m,i,m,i, etc). They can be played (a, m, i, a, m, i, etc) or even (i, m, a, m, ...


1

An E min chord is just the notes (E, G, B) with possible repeated notes. There must be a dozen ways to play this, and every other chord out there, on the guitar. So, when judging what a chord is try to use the formula. Use the major scale degrees. Major scale degrees = (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7) or (1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13). Major chord = (1, 3, 5) Minor ...


1

That's an E minor chord at the start. I don't think the contents of chords are any different in fingerstyling (though the most often used voicings very well could be). The played notes at the very start, from bottom to top, are E-G-B-G: a match for an E minor chord. The next two notes you need to play are F♯ and E. (Treat the F♯ as a passing ...


1

Throughout the song, he is using a finger-style technique with hybrid picking. The specific technique that he uses beginning at 0:18 (which you can start to see around 0:21) is called a thumb slap, as you mentioned in the question itself and as advised by the commenters. The thumb slap is the finger-style version of the Slap Strum technique, which is used ...


1

The basic D triad (when not specifying major/minor, the default is major) consists of: D - F# - A (not an F, that would be a minor third, making it a D minor triad). However, we can stack many other notes on top of this and still talk about a 'major D chord'. Take this chord symbol for example: Dmaj9. Read this as D major 9. This symbol tells us that this ...


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