New answers tagged

2

One can pick using any number of right hand patterns. For really fast tremolo it is usually better to alternate because it makes no sense to think that one can use the same finger twice at a high speed. Of course there are exceptions to every rule. I would request that you post a picture of the sheet music so we can see what you are doing. It is diffcult ...


5

In my opinion, if you're playing it as fast as you want and your hand does not hurt, then it's absolutely okay. (I think that when I played this piece (a couple of years ago), I actually used only one finger for the B string, most probably m. Alternating p-m-p-m-... is quite natural.) Alternating two (or more) fingers is very good if you want to play some ...


1

There is sort of a duality to learning music. On the one hand you would benefit from a systematic approach to learning the instrument and mastering technique. This is really critical and in my opinion anyone who wants to learn an instrument will benefit from lessons, working through the Mel Bay Series, Carcassi, Levitt, etc. On the other hand the thing ...


1

If it is taking you months to learn a song, that means the song is too hard for your playing standard now, this is a very common mistakes when people are learning. You should start with easy arrangements and work your way up. Here are some websites that I find useful for learning fingerstyle guitar: https://www.fingerstyle-guitar-today.com https://www....


1

As written it's a somewhat difficult passage. The performance is much clearer when you consider the standard notation: the A on the first string has to be held until you hit the B note tabbed on the sixth string later in the measure. Since the B is two frets higher than the A, you'd need to do the slide with your ring finger, then reach a bit with the ...


1

There is a crucial piece of information missing from this TAB. What fingering is suggested for this? If you slide using the ring finger (or pinky) your index will be free to grab the 2nd fret and should not be a problem. Whether or not that seems reasonable depends on the notes before the 2 you've shown. If you really want help please post the entire line ...


2

Not at all (if you don't have a ultra-small hand). My advice would be to play it just as it is written. The reason is that as you play more and more, your hand will be progressively more able to stretch, so after some time, you will be absolutely OK with it. On top of that, stretches like this just occur quite frequently on the guitar (they often arise ...


1

I am not sure what rules you are finding or discovering. Please take lessons for a while. It is simply not true that (i, m) will sound different than (m, i). They should not, that's what diligent practicing is for. Also, notes on the same string do not need to be played (m,i,m,i, etc). They can be played (a, m, i, a, m, i, etc) or even (i, m, a, m, ...


4

Sitting waiting, bored. Start tapping fingers on the table. Most people seem to start with pinky and work towards index. It seems to be a natural direction. So M comes before I. If that's not you, reader, then play I, then M ! Having said that, it's worth working on making exactly the same sound with each and every finger, and being able to play smoothly ...


0

Should we invert a chord to fit the melody, use them for their sound? There is a connection between the melody and bass and what chord inversion to use, but it's probably best to think in terms how the bass part works in the harmonic progression. Let say a song in the key of C has the melody in the fifth bar start with E and the chord is C major, should ...


0

I let mine float. I tend to think that if Segovia let it float, you won't get fired for doing it. It should be relaxed and fairly passive (you see some guys stick it out like it's a frozen fish stick, that always looked exhausting to me). Regarding using it, I was originally instructed not to; there's four finger notations in most instructional material, ...


2

Strictly speaking, it goes wherever you need it to go. It may be 'anchored' on the guitar top, or a string, but generally, it'll be hovering like the rest, in suspension over the strings, ready to be used. There's nothing wrong with it being used - not all the time - but whenever needed. Some players don't use it, some sites say don't use it, others use it ...


3

It should not rest anywhere. I am well aware that many players "anchor" the right hand (picking hand) both in finger style and pick style playing but this is unnecessary and will ultimately lead to the development of a handicap in terms of lost freedom of movement. Perhaps you could clarify which "finger style" you are trying to learn. In classical the ...


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