23

As Jomiddnz points out, there's pizzicato. You could also bow one string and pluck another at the same time. But if you want both notes played with the bow, and don't want the bow to catch the strings in between, the only way is by playing on the top and bottom strings with the bow under the strings. Here's an example (OK, the only example I've found): the ...


11

Just to be pedantic, you could pretty easily bow the open G and A strings together by holding the D string depressed just above the bridge.


8

Just to add to the other answers, there's this unusual technique where you loosen the hair of the bow and play with the stick of the bow under the violin, but the hair wrapping over it. This allows you to play three or four strings simultaneously. To play only two non-adjacent strings, I guess you'd need to somehow mute the string(s) in between. I never ...


7

There are two main things you can do. First, you can finger the pitch an octave higher on the next string and do vibrato on that. The note you're fingering will vibrate sympathetically from the overtones, so this will actually have an effect. Second, you can do the motion of vibrato with your left hand, but with your finger somewhere that's not doing ...


6

Absolutely, but it's harder on a modern instrument As RedLitYogi says, the convex bridge (not the fingerboard!) affects your ability to play more than two adjacent strings. A tight bow means you can only normally hit two notes at once. Historically this was not the case though. Baroque instruments had a shallower curve to the bridge, and they also used ...


3

I'm not a violinist, but I think you simply would not do this. If you want to apply vibrato to an open string, you grab that note on the next lower string and put vibrato on that note. There are some guitarists who press the string before the nut or slightly bend the neck to apply pitch changes to an open string, but I have never seen a violinist do that.


3

Contrary to what the previous answers said, it is actually possible to play vibrato on open strings: just set your finger right on the nut† and vibrate with pretty much the normal technique, so that the upper half of the swing puts some slight pressure on the string. The resulting vibrato isn't optimal intonation-wise because the deviation is only upwards, ...


2

No. It is physically impossible unless you play it pizzicato.


2

You most likely know this, but just in case: the instruments of the string choir (violin, viola, cello, bass violin) all have convex fingerboards. This makes it much easier to bow a single string than it would be if the strings were all on one plane as they are in guitars and lutes, etc. That is why the answer given in 13 seems to be the best. (Paganini ...


2

Dredging up ancient memories of my violin and viola-playing days. If you are playing an open G,D or A string then the trick is to hold down the note one octave higher on the next string (3rd position) and use vibrato on that note. You don't sound this note with the bow, and you don't achieve as vivid effect as that of a bowed, fingered note, but the effect ...


2

you only use vibrato on long lasting notes, correct? Only when you are learning. It's not like you are vibrating all time while playing It depends on the piece and the violinist. There are some pieces where good violinists will be vibrating almost all the time. it helps leaning my index finger on the neck of the violin Leaning is fine. Gripping is not. ...


2

If you used two bows you could achieve the result. It would be rather tricky to hold them both, and only short strokes would be viable without some extremely dexterous right-hand work (or perhaps a bowing action which moves the bow along the strings more than across them - which wouldn't sound great), but would be more versatile than the under-the-strings ...


2

You can pretty well taught yourself, depends on determination, talent, love for music and your instrument, ... my boyfriend is self-taught piano player, and because of his late discovered enormous talent, he is progressing a lot faster than anybody I know from music school. First thing important is to make sure your wrist and lower hand are aligned or ...


1

You should not be teaching yourself vibrato! If you do it wrong once, your muscle memory for wrong vibrato will become fixed and it will be very difficult to unlearn and relearn it. I would strongly recommend getting lessons for this!


1

Work with a teacher. (Yeah, I know, I always answer with that suggestion). Every person learning a bowed string instrument goes thru this at some point: it's a matter of learning finger shape and position, and that's best done with a teacher or other experienced player watching you. In fact, you'll have to learn not to touch neighboring strings most of the ...


1

I just realized there is a way (and it works quite well, I tried it) to play double stops on the G and A strings, while still being able to finger them normally: unscrew the the bow completely, pass the frog (carefully!) down between the E and A strings and under the A, D, and G strings. Screw it back on. Play with the bow lifted, not pressed. You will ...


1

The distance for each note on the fingerboard is dependent on each instrument's setup and string height above the fingerboard, and varies from instrument to instrument. Each instrument has to be played "by ear", listening to the fingered note and making corrections to the pitch. For beginning violinists a teacher may put some finger markings on the ...


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