14

Two months isn't a worry. You won't forget how to play the instrument, you won't lose the muscles, you won't lose the techniques. The only problem that may happen is that your fingers may begin to soften due to not playing. However, the only difference you'll notice is a little more feeling in the fingers when fingering notes and chords. They will harden ...


14

You need to understand that flamenco rhythm is very different from classical or popular music (it has more in common with Indian Classical music and the concept of "Tala"). All flamencos talk about rhythm using the notion of "compas" - these are rhythmic "styles", that include a time structure, as well as a feel and a usual tempo. For example, Bulerias ...


7

Here is what I read from my guitar book: Most authorities agree that the best approach to flamenco technique is through careful study of basic classic guitar technique. Because of the unusual and striking effects required to perform true flamenco music, the playing technique is necessarily somewhat different; however, the basic technique of playing the ...


7

You want low action, probably the most significant difference in a proper flamenco guitar. If available, get cypress (most common for "flamenca blanca" guitars) and you'll need a plate (golpeador) but you can always just slap one on yourself. Stear clear of anything with a trussrod in it. You don't want a lot of weight in a flamenco guitar. Usually the top ...


6

In Europe, stringed instruments (harps, guitars, violins) have used strings made from animal gut for millenia. The lower strings of a guitar were sometimes made with gut wrapped around a silk core. Here are the icky details.


4

Tim's answer is great, so I simply wanted to add a few things. These aren't specifically related to building strength and speed away from the guitar, but should give you some more options and help your R.H. to become more agile. By keeping your hand still as you execute a rasgueado, you are able to easily play different rhythmic variations of the basic ...


4

Pi or pmi scales, artificial harmonics, open arpeggios (i.e. when ami aren't plucking adjacent strings), muting strings with finger planting. That's a few examples of techniques that hardly ever occur in flamenco but are common in the classical repertoire. Bear in mind that some of the techniques may be shared by both but aren't exactly the same. The ...


4

When Isaac Albéniz found his musical voice, I suppose it could best be described as 'Spanish Nationalist'. The nationalist movement ln music is generally categorised as 'Romantic' I think. This Wiki article postulates a 'Golden Age' of guitar works in the Romantic period. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Classical_guitar_repertoire#Romantic_era


3

Looks like a kind of Rasgueado to me.


3

If a guitarist has a mix of several playing styles, I am afraid that you will not be able to learn this as if it were one composite style. Rather, it would be good practice to learn all these styles, and then try to understand how he combines them, so that you can mimic this. This sounds like an extreme lot of work, but your understanding of these styles ...


3

I think, as far as I can find, that as you say it is a bit of an overstatement for what it is. I think it is very similar to a typical flamenco style, with the only reference being to a guy quoted as "Amin Toufani". The only guy of a similar name who is a flamenco guitarist, is a guy called Amin Toofani, who is known for his youtube viral video. Other than ...


3

Use a very tight fist, and flick each finger out, most seem to start with pinky. Do it slowly and controlled at first, making sure to hit all the strings with equal force. Do not move your arm/wrist/hand until all four fingernails have 'rasgued'.


3

You can use Flamenco technique on a steel string, but it is not the same. I use Rasqueado technique on my Rickenbacker 660-12. The techniques are fun to incorporate into many styles of music, but if you want to learn Flamenco right, get a teacher. The Dennis Koster book "the Keys to Flamenco" is good, as is the one listed above. My instructor studied ...


3

I realize that when I replied earlier I didn't really answer the last part of your question, which is whether it makes a difference to have long nails on the strumming hand - I simply assumed they are required! At one point in classical guitar technique there was a controversy over playing with nails or without, with the nail-less camp feeling the sound was ...


3

Most common appears to be 3, 6, 8, 10 and 12, however I have heard a few that miss out the 12 and it is still recognisably Soleares. I can't find any definitive documentation one way or the other, although Wikipedia includes the 12th beat. I actually quite like using both forms within the same piece, for different sections.


3

I suspect the elusive part of "good backing tracks" is going to be the "good" part. The kind of stuff you're likely to find for sale is likely to be rather "soulless". It'll sync nicely with a metronome, but you may end up sounding like you have a metronome permanently mounted in your ear. I think it may be more useful to focus on find "good pieces" that ...


3

Keep in mind that the tapping sound from an acoustic is due to either actually hearing the tap (because you're playing live & unplugged), or because the acoustic is using a piezoelectric pickup, which generates an electrical signal based on physical contact. (I'm conveniently ignoring any microphones, because that falls under a similar umbrella as ...


3

Oh boy, this is a can of worms. I suggest trawling around youtube for advice. There is also the Delcamp classical guitar forum which has various long disussions about nails. The best shape for the nails depends on so many factors that little general advice is possible. For most players it's a long process of experiment. If you're using standard flamenco ...


3

Flamenco and classical guitar is usually played on nylon strings. The tension is different and the material is quite different. It depends on what you mean by "flamenco techniques". If you mean finger style arpeggiating chords, a lot of acoustic guitar players finger pick. Even some electric players play finger style (Joe Pass for example). However, I ...


2

(Let's start by assuming that you are using the common flamenco approach of starting the cycle of 12 beats on "12". This is highly confusing to most trained musicians, but it makes sense if you think of beginning the count on a clock face, which of course starts at the top, on 12). Keep in mind that there are number of distinct regional styles of Soleares, ...


2

I've been incorporating flamenco technique into my rock style (on steel strings) for the past 10 years and I've learned a few things that help keep the nail stronger. At first I was cutting the nails into points at about a 60-degree angle. I coated them with "Nail strengthener" (the stuff with little fibers in it) and then a thick coat of black or dark-...


2

I love the sound of steel string acoustic, and tried to play some flamenco techniques on a steel string guitar, with silk and steel strings. It sounded much better than a nylon string guitar, to me at least, but I broke my nails, and I play usually a nylon string guitar now, although I don't like the sound. Perhaps try a guitar with Martin silk and steel or ...


2

So... Do you want a long-winded rant??? Actually, this question is difficult to answer because the range of "Spanish Music" is vast, even for the guitar. There's Spanish Baroque guitar music, which uses a 5-course guitar, all but the highest course double-strung. There's a strong movement of people playing this music on period instruments (I have one ...


2

While Chiron is correct, there is a fair amount of crossover betwen the two styles. If you play Spanish Classical pieces by Albeniz and Tarrega and even Sor, you will find rasgueados, trills, tremolos, pinched harmonics, and other flamenco effects. It's clear that those guys were playing flamenco on the weekend. So know the difference, but study both. ...


2

Additional to Kyle Brand's ideas, which are clear and to the point, I always keep in my head the statements from Steve Vai on 'How to be Successful': I always find it inspiring and puts me back in the mood to keep practicing and overcome the frustration. I think the statement that resonates in my head the strongest is '...


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