Hot answers tagged

44

Absolutely. Nobody ever expects (extreme case) Itzhak Perlman to stand. Personally, I'd be a happy audience if a flautist sat on a barstool, as many guitarists tend to do. Now, performing while on a unicycle...


30

I've never seen a flutist sit, but I've also not seen very many flute soloists. What I have seen is plenty of soloists that do sit, so you'd be in good company! And keep in mind that cellists, pianists, harpists, tubists, etc. sit. Why should you feel out of place for sitting? Do whatever helps you perform the best!


24

The flute, like most wind instruments, is considered to be monophonic (as opposed to a piano, which is polyphonic), meaning you can only play one note at a time (within reasonable ability). However, there exist "extended techniques" on the flute that go beyond the standard teachings. In this case, "multiphonics" (which is an odd term, since "multi-" is ...


22

The handover is feasible. The circular breathing thing would be classed as a #special skill' I think! But how long do you need? A good flautist might give you 30 seconds without special technique.


17

This is a terrific, and very important, question! Have you ever heard a recording of yourself speaking? Did it come across as odd to you? Did you ever think "that's not how I sound!"? The same is often true when we play an instrument. In fact, playing an instrument is even more complex. In a kind of auditory McGurk Effect, our brain has to distinguish ...


16

Orchestral flautists sit the whole time so it's clearly possible to play the flute to a high standard while sitting. It's the 21st century and people are used to legislation that requires employers to make reasonable accommodations for people with disabilities. This doesn't sound like an employment situation but the same principles and expectations apply. ...


14

Silver polish does not "mask" tarnish but rather restores the silver when it is not thoroughly corroded: tarnish is silver sulfide and a proper silver polish will let the sulfide escape again (leading to a smell of rotten eggs). While I would not bother about the flute being "unpresentable", it does make sense to not let the tarnish proceed to far. You ...


13

You wouldn’t need to relearn theory or reading music. You wouldn’t need to learn to establish a practice regimen. You wouldn’t need to relearn to hear intervals or feel a beat. Going from flute to guitar, you would need to memorize the positions of notes and chords. You would need to develop calluses. You would have to suffer the pain of learning to contort ...


10

Generally, yes, it is considered less-than-ideal performance practice for a few reasons: It is distracting to the audience. It takes away from the character of the music (unless it's notated in there.) Hearing a performer take a breath indicates that they are straining, restricting the amount of airflow they intake, and as such, are breathing inefficiently. ...


10

Loudness is only one factor.Sound works in many ways, and this will compound the answer. Listen to a band playing when you're outside the hall, and you'll hear the bass far better than guitars, drums etc. The low frequencies can travel better. So, a higher register instrument may be better. Consider the piercing aspect of a sound. In fresh air, it'll carry ...


9

Or you can always buy the book. Quantz did in fact write what many consider the definitive book on playing the baroque flute and since you are playing a piece written by him I don't see how you can go wrong following his advice. Google 'Quantz on playing the flute.' I quick note I do not have the quote handy but to paraphrase Quantz, "repeated passages ...


9

When we bought the first flute for our daughter, her teacher recommended open keys and the difference was even hearable for us as uninformed listeners, even if their main purpose is microtonal adjustments in pitch by partial covering. There are two further reasons, which I consider as striking: You are enforced, to set your fingers carefully and correct ...


9

The short answer: no, there isn't. The long answer: The six-hole chart you give for your tin whistle is for a tin whistle in D. A soprano recorder is in C. No, you are not going to find a D wind with the exact same fingerings as a C wind. However, there is something called a german-fingered recorder. A soprano (C) german-fingered recorder happens to ...


9

The point of a silver plated instrument instead of a lacquered "student model" is not for visual aesthetics, but rather because the vibrations in the metal that accompany note production are damped slightly by commonly-used lacquer finishes, which have more of an undesirable effect on the instrument's timbre than silver plating does. Unfortunately I ...


9

It's a duduk, an Armenian instrument. In my opinion it's one of the most beautiful sounding instruments every created. Sometimes clarinet players can sort capture some of the essence of its sound, but honestly for me there really in nothing like it. Of course, the raw sound of the instrument itself is only one of the reasons it sounds so enchanting, the ...


8

The support of the flute is primarily a balance between the lip plate as it contacts your face and the rest of your fingers on the keys, using the heel of the first finger of your left hand as a fulcrum. One of the "key" things to understand about this is that there are no notes on the flute with a completely open fingering. The right hand pinky rests on a ...


8

There are a few things that closed holes below the first open tone hole can do. In the case of that first C, what's happening is called shading. The tone holes of this instrument aren't as wide as the bore, so not all of the air can escape out of the first open tone hole. Some of it continues and goes out of the next open hole, and the result is that the ...


8

The consensus seems to be- and this is borne out by my own experience as well- that there is some difference between the sound of flutes made of different materials, but that this is minor, especially between materials of similar specific gravity. Thus, there's a pretty big difference between wood and silver, not so much between nickel and silver, and a ...


8

If you were performing in an ensemble of 3 or more people - a flute quartet for example - you would not think twice would you; you would always sit. So its not really an unusual way to perform. And even if it were you are still free to do whatever you need to feel comfortable and perform at your best. So go for it, and good luck with the performance


7

If you enjoy classical, ethnic or folk music, go for the recorder. However, as you say you like rock, I'd say the harmonica is more common for this genre. Also, since you're playing at parties, I'd also choose the harmonica because it is louder than the recorder. Harmonica It's simple, but like any instrument it gets more complicated as your learn more, ...


7

I would add to @jjmusicnotes answer that if you can hear the breath, then something is likely interfering with your intake of breath - which is not good. One of my old instructors said "Think 'HO' in reverse". This means to shape your throat and mouth into the same shape as when you say 'HO' and then breath in. Try it!


7

I'm going to assume that you've already checked your flute to see if it needs repairs. Here are a few tips I can give you to improve your output of low notes (I've been playing the flute for about 6 years, so I used to encounter these issues in the beginning too): Practice the lower notes: If you are adapting your sheet music to an octave higher, then ...


7

No, you don't always have to count the numbers in your head all the time. As you work on counting rhythms, eventually, with enough practice, you can develop a "feel" for how many counts or bars have gone by. Also, when reading notated rhythms you will eventually develop a "rhythm vocabulary", where you will recognize a rhythm pattern that you have ...


7

This answer is slightly modified from a forum post I once wrote elsewhere to explain in detail why the flute's "complicated" design is the way it is. It's long as anything, but it does answer the question, so why not? TL;DR included at the bottom. Let's start with the question about the B flat, and other alternate fingerings. There are some notes with ...


7

It's always acceptable to be seated. Standing is more conventional for a single soloist, but a group of performers would be seated. The only advantage of standing would be diaphragm and breath control. That isn't an insurmountable obstacle whilst playing.


6

The 2nd trill key is used for the higher C-D trill. Better sound quality.


6

Tips on proper flute embouchure: Aperture (space between your lips) should look like a flat football. Use a mirror! Think of whistling = corners of mouth together and open aperture, then bring corners back and down (like a frown.) Lips should be smooth so air stream can be smooth. Aim air stream for edge on the far side of the opening (that's where the air ...


6

From the perspective of a music educator: the flute would be much easier to learn proper embouchure fundamentals on, as, with the lower pitch, it's more more forgiving. During my college days, I picked up the flute quite quickly, but I had a difficult time achieving a good tone on the piccolo. That said, it would not be impossible to learn on it's own, just ...


6

I play both the flute and piccolo, so my answer is completely based off of personal experience. In my opinion, the piccolo and flute are completely different. The only thing that's similar about the two is fingering. I suggest memorizing the piccolo fingering if you just want to play piccolo, since the piccolo does not have some of the keys that a flute ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible