Hot answers tagged

39

Three hours at one session! Unless you're the sort of person who can concentrate really well for that length of time, you've wasted at least some of it. Harsh, but realistic. Most of us cannot give 100% for that length of time! If you can organise your time into (much) smaller chunks, the progress will usually be speeded up. Perhaps even 20 minutes at a ...


12

I suspect your teacher suggested that you play it at a slower tempo. When you say that it didn't really help, I would suggest that you practice it at an even slower tempo, and continue to slow it down until it does help. Also, break the piece up into sections, and work on one section at a time. If you have trouble getting through a section without losing ...


9

You have spent three hours training yourself to play it wrong. Play it RIGHT. This probably means playing it M-U-C-H M-O-R-E S-L-O-W-L-Y. Yes, REALLY slowly. At some point your hands have got into a position where playing the next right note is impossible. Or you've just got used to playing the wrong note. Sort this out. Then play that bit slowly, ...


4

It sounds like you are taking the right steps (e.g. practicing and asking your teacher), but learning to play an instrument is not easy, even with the best advice. It takes a lot of work over a long period of time. Great job practicing for three hours today! Practice for three hours more tomorrow. You will almost definitely play the piece better than you ...


4

Here are some tips I learned playing marimba in drum corps that have also served me well over my decades playing piano as well as teaching marching band: When learning a challenging passage, practice it "backwards" -- that is, start by practicing the last bar first. If that's too much, just the last beat. Practice just that short part over and over until ...


4

In addition to all the great answers here, I would like to add the following: sleep over it. In the sense, it is great you have practiced for 3 hours straight today. Take a break and do it again tomorrow after a good night sleep. I frequently find that I play better the day after compared to the day itself (or after a long rest). Don't give up!


3

My music teacher says "stop on the glitch". This works for me: If there is a part that I am doing wrong, I just stop at that point and re-do the part several times.


3

Good answers, +1 to each. One thing I would like to add is that the amount of time you practice is not as important as having a plan to make your practice more productive. Do you tend to make the same mistake or mistakes in the same places over and over? If so then you need to focus on those spots before you continue to play the piece from beginning to end. ...


2

There can be different reasons making mistakes: a) Difficulty of reading, minding sharps and flats b) Interpreting the rhythm c) Finger settings d) Phrasing and breathing Solutions: a) Notate the note names additional to the notes on the sheet, or separate in an exercise booklet (with notes or without notes) only the difficult passages and those ...


1

If you have played it for 3 hours with the mistake then unfortunately what you have done is to become very good at that mistake. You have "programmed" yourself to play the mistake, and I would guess that you play it the same way each time unless the piece was is such bad shape that it had mistakes all over. Every time you repeat a mistake you are basically ...


1

Are there any particular places in the song that keeps tripping you up? If so, just concentrate practicing on those problematic areas first. Once you are no longer making mistakes in those parts, restart the song from the beginning and see if you could sail through those parts without any more problems. If you still have problems, rinse and repeat!


1

Simple If you like western music that relies on the a wide range of notes, go for western flute because it can cover more notes. While a bansuri only has 6/8 holes which has a limited range of notes but can make much more soothing music by ornamenting each notes. If you like that, then go for bansuri. For a beginner, I recommend bansuri because of simple ...


1

You can buy a left handed flute for around 700 euros. I can't play right handed flutes AT ALL. I've tried. Just google 'buy left hand flute'.


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