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12

These measurements aren't totally accurate, as they've rounded to the nearest half inch to make it look nice. It also looks like you've built a "transposing" pan flute- your "C" is actually an A, and it should play in A major, not C major. Anyway, to find the theoretical correct length for each straw, you want to divide the wavelength of ...


10

On the western C-flute it's standard to use the pads on the tips of the fingers, in fact on the open-hole flutes played by a lot of professionals that's the only way possible. The second joint is used on bagpipes and a lot of ethnic flutes Irish whistles, bansuris, neys etc. Ian Anderson developed his style of playing without any musical training and it wasn'...


4

The crucial thing is that poking your finger just a little way into the tube does not close it off – it's still an open-pipe situation, unlike an extended swanee whistle. Only as you push it in further, the remaining opening gets smaller and smaller, thereby changing the acoustic behaviour from “open pipe” to “closed pipe”, and the closed pipe has a much ...


4

This is guitar part, not flute, right? In guitar notation "full" means to bend note by a whole tone, in this case from A to B. I'm not sure if you can recreate this exact effect of flute; perhaps you can simply play B on the last beat. Maybe you can play a half bend A#-B, if you can? Or glissando A-A#-B? Whatever sounds the best.


4

While it's true that a violin can play loud, a flute is technically louder due to its nature. Not only: trying to play very loud on a violin while keeping a good sound is hard, and there are limits over which you just can't (those limits also depend on the quality of the instrument and the bow, not only the technique); on the contrary, having a good sound ...


3

Have you had someone who can play flute - your tutor, maybe, or a trusted colleague - check that there's no mechanical and / or manufacturing issue with the instrument itself? Extremely unlikely, but worth doing to rule that out, as keys and springs can get bent in shipping and handling for example. Otherwise yes, it's very likely to be you adjusting to the ...


3

The score provided bears some similarity to the recording below, so I've based this roadmap on that. Play from measures 1 - 19 (first "coda 1" sign) Jump to measure 21 (matching "code 1" sign) and play only that measure Return to measure 20 (i.e., first "coda 1" sign) and play that measure Repeat as notated, back to measure 14. ...


3

When recording, the backing track is almost always put down first. One reason is that it provides the tempo for the piece. If you can't keep time with a backing track, imagine what a disater it would be if you recorded just your part first !! So, whether it's vocals, solo trumpet or flute, that usually is the last to be put down. Given that the backing track ...


3

Seems like you have some troubles with the rhythm and/or keeping a steady tempo. This is pretty common with students. What you can do is practice the piece with a metronome, without the background music. This way you will be able to see how the song is supposed to be played rhythm and tempo wise. Then you can slowly start adding the background recording and ...


3

You answered the question in its final sentence. You PRACTICE it. If the piece keeps a constant tempo this won't be too hard. You just need ears, plus sufficient flute technique to be ABLE to play without hesitation. If the tempo varies, you'll have to practice more! But it's perfectly possible. In the early days of multi-track recording (when 'multi' ...


3

The notes in the first example are "grace notes," and are meant to be played quickly as an ornament with the main note starting on the downbeat. (Imagine someone saying "and-a-one, and-a-two"... those two notes are the "and-a" part.) In the second example, the first note is a sixteenth note, which is half as long as the eighth ...


3

You will need a reference instrument: a piano perhaps, or one of those pitch-pipes guitarists use when tuning their instrument. If you listen for a while you may be able to decide "Ah! that's the very bottom note: that quiet one!", and then find it on your reference instrument. Am I right in thinking there is a 'break' between the lowest octave and ...


3

The quick answer is yes you are right. Guitars are chromatic and thus would have all the same pitch classes as any flute would have. However, guitars being Western music instruments, and Native American flutes being Native American instruments, might not be using the same size of intervals so some notes might not match exactly. But then again it is quite ...


3

Theory says that for the notes in between (sharps and flats), the length should be about halfway between each two. That should give you 12tet. However, the lengths quoted may well not be meant for that, and will produce a good sound just in one key. Like Just Intonation. So finding the average of two lengths and dividing by two could easily make the new note ...


2

Having a Pan flute starting at middle C it is mutch simpler to read at concert pitch. For me. I know that for some panflutist reading it an octave lower is a norm because at first it was hard to find bamboo long enough to make the long tube. Therefore most Pan flute (in Romania) had the same range of the piccolo but read their sheet and octave lower. Edit: ...


2

Listen for cadences, where the music is at a rest point. Particularly the ones at the end of a verse, or chorus. They will generally provide a triad chord - here a minor triad. One of those notes - often the one played - will be the root of that triad, and thus be the tonic. The notes here seem to be from a natural minor scale, which could also translate to ...


2

So far as the sound produced goes, it makes no difference at all what hand - or fingers - you use. However, if you want to be able to switch rapidly from that class of Middle Eastern straight flutes to general "blockflotes" aka recorders, or to "querflotes," the transverse flutes, and so on, I would strongly recommend using the left hand ...


2

Starting a note with the tongue on or behind your teeth is called 'tonguing'. You can use a 'ta' syllable with the tongue touching your teeth or a 'da' syllable with the the tongue touching the roof of your mouth which gives a softer sound. If you want to move between notes smoothly, don't tongue the second and subsequent notes and keep the air-stream moving....


2

The keys refer to pentatonic minors. So the A flute will play A C D E and G.Those notes also match up with C major pent. The G gives G B♭ C D and F, also usable as B♭ maj. pent. And the F♯ will work with A maj. pent. So, it will depend largely on which keys you and your accompanists want to use. There's also the propensity to use minor pents over major ...


2

A single violin should be able to balance just fine with a flute. A good start might be to turn off ALL amplification.


2

If you play the track with headphones on, whilst you record yourself, as long as you play in time you'll be in time with the track.


1

I think playing to a click track and a backing track feel different. A background track will normally provide rhythm, harmony, and dynamic cues that help you feel the beat. A click track is a meaningless click, there are no musical cues. I suppose you could say playing in sync is all about anticipating the beat, or you might call it predicting the beat. ...


1

Based on the excerpt presented, yes, the song can be played, but not as written. Some of the notes in the version of "Flight" presented in the question are too high for the flute's range (the high D and E). However, transposing down a perfect fourth would put all of the notes within the range of the flute (first line F# to B above the staff). This ...


1

How many violins should play alongside a single flute? Anywhere between 0 and 40. What's most appropriate depends not so much on loudness but on the musical context and what sort of sound you want. Violin is a very versatile instrument, but it not only can be different but needs to be used differently to be effective in different context. It can be used in ...


1

You have already got answers, but none mentioned which technique to use. If someone played on your violin and demonstrated that it can be loud, then ask them what tecnique they apply. If you want a strong sound there are some things you can do: Play with stronger bow pressure (you already know that). Play longer bow strokes, which means the bow moves faster. ...


1

An alternative approach available to you would be to say ‘well if you can do it, damn well do it yourself’, attend your church as a congregation member rather than as a musician, and find somewhere to play where you’re appreciated and don’t get that sort of unhelpful ‘advice’. Unless you are being handsomely paid for your church gigs there is no compulsion ...


1

There will be a difference, but probably a subtle one. What you're hearing from a flute is overwhelmingly vibration of the enclosed air column. The body's job is to define the size and shape of that air column. Experiment. Results may not be intuitive. I recall an experiment using different materials for a trumpet bell section. One made of stainless ...


1

The first example, "grace notes" are not counted as part of the rhythm. They are inserted very quickly before the C on beat 1. You can take a little time away from the end of the previous measure to accommodate them. The second example is typically counted this way: B A----(A)----- G---------------| 1 e & a 2 e & a 3 e & a 4 e & a | where 1 e &...


1

It appears that a dizi in D is easier to play than the others, and a lot of traditional music is written in that key. So there's a solution. I'd have advocated buying three or four, but they aren't cheap! Good quality, at least. Having had a look around, there are cheap ones available for £10-£20, so it's feasible to buy those three or four for some people, ...


1

Try to sing the melody, phrase by phrase. Usually a phrase ends on the first degree or if it is a half cadence on the fifth. In major this is do or so, in minor this is la or mi. I would think the first step would be to find out the scale of the song, that would narrow down the options of the keys. (If you don’t know the names of movable do re mi you can ...


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