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25

If someone is asking about the key of the instrument, I would answer "I play in concert pitch." If when jamming, someone asks "what key are you in?" I would say, "I am playing in (name a key) concert pitch." Then everyone else will transpose appropriately. In a group with many transposing and non-transposing instruments, a discussion might be needed to find ...


11

If someone asks you what key you play in, I take it as meaning "name a key". You say what you want, and the others will follow. If you want to jam in F#, you'll tell them "let's play in F#". Each person should know how their transposing or non-transposing instrument behaves and what to do when told to play in F#. If F# is difficult for someone, they can say "...


9

"All music is folk music. I ain't never heard a horse sing a song." -- Louis Armstrong First off, let's narrow things down a bit here. It sounds like you're talking about American folk music rather than folk music as a whole. Other folk musics would take a book to explain. American folk music has the following characteristics: Acoustic instruments ...


8

A short answer: Scarborough Fair is not in the minor, but is modal: Dorian (that's where the major IV chord comes from) and Aeolian (the minor iv). The modal character is underscored by the progression VII-i, which is normal for Dorian and Aeolian, and the fact that there is no major V chord. And no, this doesn't come from Bach- its roots are probably ...


7

What key? A minor, see Richard's answer (and my comment) Which Harmonica to use Harmonica is a diatonic instrument designed to play simple major folk tunes, however that's often not the way it's used in the modern day. "minor harmonicas" do have some interesting applications, but they are a read herring to this question, for these applications what you ...


7

The song Tu, manu seserėlė was taken from Anton Juszkiewicz’s Melodje ludowe litewskie, (number 157 in the collection. You can see a copy of the tune. In abc format: X:157 T:Tu, manu seserėlė C:Trad. M:3/4 K:B L:1/4 edB|G2d|1c2d:|2c2c|:edc|f2e|d2c|edB|G2d|c2c:|


7

There are some things that will make you lose less: a big revelation for me was when I realized I was using way more bow and force than necessary. A combination of weight (literal weight, let gravity do more of the work than muscle) and a slow stroke using minimal bow length helped a lot. Also, the examples here are amplified; if possible, practice the ...


7

I’m sorry you don’t find “spoons, washboards, and flatfoot dancing” an acceptable answer. I would invite you to consider that spoons, washboards, and feet all feature some things in common that drums do not—they’re inexpensive, they don’t take up much space, they’re very portable, and they’re ubiquitous—every household, even in impoverished Appalachia, had ...


5

"All music is folk music. I ain't never heard a horse sing a song." -- Louis Armstrong American folk music has the following characteristics: Acoustic instruments Simple chord progressions such as C-F-G or Am-G Simple time signatures such as 3/4 or 4/4 "Sharp" or natural keys such as C, D, E, G or A Simple scales such as pentatonic minor (blues), ...


4

A great deal of it is improvised, much in the same sense that Indian Raga is improvised. That is to say, a lot of melodic framework and development is predetermined, but there is a lot of room to work around the predefined bits. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arabic_maqam explains this well.


4

Well, for one, there are many more cultures in Russia than just Russians. If it's Siberian you're looking for, then search for that. And other regions nearby. There's also some musical overlap between Siberian, Mongolian, and Tuvan folk styles. "Peoples of Russia" is a good search term for general ethnographic information. There have been several books with ...


4

Many of the old traditional folk songs originated before the advent of recorded music. Typically folk songs were composed for the enjoyment of friends and family and neighbors with no thought of profiting commercially, thus there was no desire or need to copyright the songs or even write them down. Many folk songs became popular and were transmitted ...


4

The drum kit does not feature much in Traditional Irish music. Why not sit down at your kit with headphones and play along with some of the pogues numbers or whatever songs you'd like to be able to play? There are apps and software to slow the tune down so you can figure out what the drummer is doing. But as you say, the style is mostly based on rock and ...


4

You will not find a scale that contains all those chords. But you don't have to. There is a term "chromatic". It describes notes and chords that don't use the notes of the "scale of the key". You don't need to "borrow" chords from anywhere, it's perfectly alright to be firmly in C major but use a Fm chord. Think the end of that very simple tune "When ...


4

I can't speak for what blues harp or penny whistle to use, but I can address the question of key: Pieces with progressions like Am--Dm--Am--E are unequivocally in the key of A minor. If you've ever heard the joke that "there are only three chords" in popular music, these are the exact three chords you're playing! In music theory parlance, we call this a i--...


4

First of all, wow! That is a great song and great performance. Wish I could sing like that. Second, I would say the entire song is an elaboration of a half-diminished chord (B, D, F, A) with a kind of contrast to an implied A minor chord near the end of the refrain. Rather than avoiding the C it provides the flat 2nd degree. The degree that is avoided ...


4

If the question is about whether you have a transposing instrument (or not) your answer would be 'I'm in C' or 'I'm concert pitch'. Your soprano sax playing friend would answer 'B♭'. This might occur if someone's handing out sheet music and needs to know whether to give you a transposed copy. If the question is about what key you prefer to play a ...


3

Playing on a blues harp necessitates using a harp that is a fourth above the key everyone else is playing in. So, in Am, the sequence quoted, a Dm will be best. Not a common beast, though. You could try an F harp, which will play nearly all the same notes, although the draw/blow may vary. A D harp will give , again, nearly all you need.And to play ...


3

There is not a hard and fast rule, but there are lots of loose guidelines. Here are a few places to get started. 1) Emphasize the off beats. In dance music, the phrases will usually start on beat 1, but a strong off beat will pull the dancers along. 2) Slur across the beats. A beginner will often slur the notes in a jig as 123 456. An experienced player ...


3

Apart from the common use of the major and minor chords that occur in songs - I,IV,V,ii,iii,vi - another set of chords is sometimes used, from the PARALLEL key. Thus, say in C, the chord pool is C,Dm,Em,F,G,Am, but also Cm,Eb,Fm,Gm,Ab,Bb. I've left out the more rarely used dims.


3

Bela Bartok was an Ethnomusicologist too.. he was known to have collected some gypsy songs, for example: -> If you are searching for a book on this subject, Bela Bartok's Studies in Ethnomusicology seems to be interesting: http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=LKQuRowyjPcC&printsec=frontcover&dq=Bela+Bartok+Studies+...


3

Done properly, you don’t need to lose hairs. You end up losing hairs when you have too much sideways or twisting movement. It’s the type of movement that makes you break them, not the aggressiveness. I don’t do it enough to be comfortable explaining, especially in words rather than in person with instrument in hand, so I’ll refer you to the world’s experts. ...


3

At least for dances from the Romantic era and backwards, music for different dance types in the same meter and tempo are not quite interchangeable. For example, even though they are both fairly slow dances in triple meter, the polonaise uses an 8th-16th-16th rhythmic pattern more often, emphasizes the first beat more, and often sounds more stately, while the ...


3

With certainty, you can say that you play in C. This means, as you said, that when you have a C written, you will also hear a C. A clarinet in A would produce a sounding A when reading/playing a C. A trumpet in B-flat produces a B-flat when reading/playing a C. Thus if you say an instrument plays in 'X', 'X' is the tone produced when he plays his or her ...


3

It's originally a Polish folk dance. It was adopted by classical composers later on.


3

Dances were adopted by classical music from very early on: In the baroque era, suites consisted of dances like Allemande, Courante, Sarabande, Menuet and Gigue. More often than not, this led to very elaborate forms, which no longer could be danced. Waltzes from the Strauss family still can be recognized as waltzes, but may need quite good dancers to be ...


2

When rock guitarists sacrifice their guitars in what appears to be a moment of pure emotion it is often pre-planned and they have already swapped to a cheaper guitar than their main instrument(s). Perhaps you could keep some cheaper bows purely for this technique? Another idea, though from a different context, would be to try a viola bow. I know that Steve ...


2

While you could say the piece is in A minor, it doesn't really use the tonal ideas brought from the common practice period. If it did, you would see E or E7 much more instead of Em. The piece builds more off the naturally constructed chords of the A minor scale which means it uses much more modal ideas and I wouldn't expect certain tonal ideas, like the ...


2

It sounds primitive and un-artistic, but yes, sheer amount of material counts for a lot in these things. Writing a dozen variations on an existing theme certain amounts to a new composition by most people's standards, while writing only an arrangement of the theme is clearly a mere arrangement. More interesting are cases where someone takes a known theme and ...


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