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15

That is known as an Erke. The erke (alternatively erque, coroneta, or quepa) is a large labrophone (lip reed) instrument native to the Gran Chaco of Bolivia, northern Chile, and Argentine Northwest. (SOURCE: Wikipedia) (PHOTO CREDIT: By N J.O. Zavalía - https://www.flickr.com/photos/122267223@N07/13614627804/, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/...


10

The best way to start is by learning all of the Dylan songs you like. Transcribe them or if that's too hard at the beginning try to find transcriptions that other people have made. Once you have digested Dylan's harmonic language you'll probably come up with ideas to develop it in a different direction, and finally you'll develop you own personal voice.


8

We hear the first G chord as ♭VII of A minor. The second one follows a string of C major chords and feels like V of C major. Yes, it's interesting what a big difference the context makes.


6

First thing that comes to mind is that Dylan can go off the chords you'd expect in any key. First example is actually a song he covers but didn't write, "Baby Let Me Follow You Down". G F Baby let me follow you down C Eb Baby let me follow you down G D C D I'll do anything in ...


5

yet they are complex and mysterious and rich Um, no, not the first two. They're entirely appropriate to the song, which is the key part. That's not about chord progressions though - it's much more about fingerpicking and strumming patterns. This may lead to some effect of inversions if you look at the theory, but that only derives from standard picking ...


4

As others suggested, the best way is to immerse in his songs, of course by listening, but I would add also "with paper and pencil", to study the chord progressions. I did that a few years ago, and it's interesting. With time you notice a few patterns "Oh this is interesting". Since you cite Don't think twice it's alright, I think you ...


3

Personally, I think there's a lot of fun to be had playing folk music solo on the violin - a lot of British/European folk music contains double-stops, and melodies with a strong emphasis on chord tones, that mean the violin part carries the chord progression — and likewise the rhythmic feel of folk violin means that you can play up a storm in the kitchen on ...


2

It's just called alternate bass. Regarding stopping the strings... well, practice! – that's actually a crucial ability to have on bass, in any genre. I guess the problem you're referring here is specifically that you're always changing the string after every note, i.e. you can't just use the next-plucking finger to damp the previous note, as you would in (...


2

Having a Pan flute starting at middle C it is mutch simpler to read at concert pitch. For me. I know that for some panflutist reading it an octave lower is a norm because at first it was hard to find bamboo long enough to make the long tube. Therefore most Pan flute (in Romania) had the same range of the piccolo but read their sheet and octave lower. Edit: ...


2

Often it's a case of chasing through libraries, recordings, and memories. The Library of Congress has a large amount of old sheet music. https://www.loc.gov/collections/historic-sheet-music/about-this-collection/ A source for early tangos is Todotango.com. https://www.todotango.com/english/ You can search for melodies or lyrics (mostly melodies.) There are ...


2

Keywords here are blues scale, and even more importantly blue notes. See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_note Blue notes appear in various styles, particularly often in blues, but also in jazz, rock and others. Various musicians, using various instruments play them differently, e.g. by playing note in between two pitches, sliding between them, playing ...


2

If someone tried to describe this song to me by saying it's "modal", I would think of something completely different. It's bluegrass, with bluesy bends in the melody. I'd guess that even the most pathologically classically oriented music theorists must have encountered the term "blues" by now. Some anonymous Internet writers have written ...


2

It's basically blues. Major key music inflected with blue notes. The rhythm accompaniment patterns are what make it specifically bluegrass. Most of the time the harmony - heard most clearly by following the bass - is one chord B major. But while the bass spends most of the time thumping along with roots and fifths of a B major chord it will do a little ...


2

Analogous? I think yes. I think it all falls under the broad category of culture, and that is where the sense of analogy lies. Language and music are both cultural artifacts. You probably want to consider whether some musical thing developed independently in different cultures. I'm sure such things are topics of hot debate between scholars. For example: ...


1

Never occurred to me before now, but I'd have thought it followed the same trajectory. As goes the language, so goes the folk music tradition. The further apart the languages get, the music follows. Isolating itself culturally & linguistically until fairly recent times. You could even apply this to the differences between English, Scots, Welsh & ...


1

This tune is 100% modal, and it uses a single scale from beginning to end. Now, please note that "modal" doesn't mean "using one of the seven major scale modes". "Modal" describes any music which is built around a scale -- any scale -- rather than on the combination of chords and melody. For example, Indian classical music is ...


1

It seems like there are indeed 3 voices. Here is an idea of what they do, sounds good but lacks a lot of subtilities


1

Laurence answered this. I'd just add that the "chord of suspense" is not E or E7 because this piece is modal, in A Aeolian, not in A minor.


1

I think it's a great idea! And there are tons of public domain tune books online. One thing to consider is some folk music uses alternate tunings. Maybe some of the music you like uses such tunings. Or, you might be curious to try it out. I can't play violin, but I get by on guitar. I've tried alternate guitar tunings and it's a nice way to get a fresh view ...


1

There’s a huge tradition of violin (often aka fiddle) music in the various British folk musics and in many other traditional musics worldwide. Pentangle and Ygdrassil are as good a starting point as any, and you’ll be preparing yourself for a lifetime of happy & & fulfilling playing if you put the starting work in now.


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