Hot answers tagged

25

If someone is asking about the key of the instrument, I would answer "I play in concert pitch." If when jamming, someone asks "what key are you in?" I would say, "I am playing in (name a key) concert pitch." Then everyone else will transpose appropriately. In a group with many transposing and non-transposing instruments, a discussion might be needed to find ...


11

If someone asks you what key you play in, I take it as meaning "name a key". You say what you want, and the others will follow. If you want to jam in F#, you'll tell them "let's play in F#". Each person should know how their transposing or non-transposing instrument behaves and what to do when told to play in F#. If F# is difficult for someone, they can say "...


4

Personally, I think there's a lot of fun to be had playing folk music solo on the violin - a lot of British/European folk music contains double-stops, and melodies with a strong emphasis on chord tones, that mean the violin part carries the chord progression — and likewise the rhythmic feel of folk violin means that you can play up a storm in the kitchen on ...


4

If the question is about whether you have a transposing instrument (or not) your answer would be 'I'm in C' or 'I'm concert pitch'. Your soprano sax playing friend would answer 'B♭'. This might occur if someone's handing out sheet music and needs to know whether to give you a transposed copy. If the question is about what key you prefer to play a ...


3

With certainty, you can say that you play in C. This means, as you said, that when you have a C written, you will also hear a C. A clarinet in A would produce a sounding A when reading/playing a C. A trumpet in B-flat produces a B-flat when reading/playing a C. Thus if you say an instrument plays in 'X', 'X' is the tone produced when he plays his or her ...


3

At least for dances from the Romantic era and backwards, music for different dance types in the same meter and tempo are not quite interchangeable. For example, even though they are both fairly slow dances in triple meter, the polonaise uses an 8th-16th-16th rhythmic pattern more often, emphasizes the first beat more, and often sounds more stately, while the ...


3

Some Irish fiddlers I've played with tuned up their violins a half step and would describe their instruments as being "in F", no matter what key the song was in, and some hardanger fiddlers I've met play in all sorts of weird tunings that heavily favor a certain key or keys. So, depending on the type of folk music you're playing, this question could have ...


3

Dances were adopted by classical music from very early on: In the baroque era, suites consisted of dances like Allemande, Courante, Sarabande, Menuet and Gigue. More often than not, this led to very elaborate forms, which no longer could be danced. Waltzes from the Strauss family still can be recognized as waltzes, but may need quite good dancers to be ...


3

It's originally a Polish folk dance. It was adopted by classical composers later on.


2

It's just called alternate bass. Regarding stopping the strings... well, practice! – that's actually a crucial ability to have on bass, in any genre. I guess the problem you're referring here is specifically that you're always changing the string after every note, i.e. you can't just use the next-plucking finger to damp the previous note, as you would in (...


2

I think it's a great idea! And there are tons of public domain tune books online. One thing to consider is some folk music uses alternate tunings. Maybe some of the music you like uses such tunings. Or, you might be curious to try it out. I can't play violin, but I get by on guitar. I've tried alternate guitar tunings and it's a nice way to get a fresh view ...


2

There’s a huge tradition of violin (often aka fiddle) music in the various British folk musics and in many other traditional musics worldwide. Pentangle and Ygdrassil are as good a starting point as any, and you’ll be preparing yourself for a lifetime of happy & & fulfilling playing if you put the starting work in now.


2

Having a Pan flute starting at middle C it is mutch simpler to read at concert pitch. For me. I know that for some panflutist reading it an octave lower is a norm because at first it was hard to find bamboo long enough to make the long tube. Therefore most Pan flute (in Romania) had the same range of the piccolo but read their sheet and octave lower. Edit: ...


2

A flautist (panflautist?) proficient enough to get an orchestra seat has enough piano-plunking literacy to read bass clef, so transposed is safe. But if most of the material is closer to a concert pitch clef, use that, at least to not confuse the conductor, to thereby save a few seconds during rehearsals.


2

If someone is asking about the key of the instrument, I would answer "I can play in any key", possibly adding "but I'd prefer to jam in [insert favorite key]". I'd give the same answer even I have play a transposing instrument. In that kind of situation nobody else cares about your transposition. If they say "we'll play this piece in D" and you say "ok, ...


2

Most instruments can be played in all keys. In a jam session, the key of a piece is important to know, so everyone is playing in that same key! When playing a transposing instrument (trumpet, clarinet, sax, etc.) adjustments need to be made. For instance, without dots, if the tune to be played is in do, any clarinettist (in si bemol) will have to pretend ...


2

An instrument isn't "in a key", a piece is. If you are improvising/jamming, you can assume a non-transposing instrument to be in 'C-major', but when playing a piece, you are in the key that the piece is written in (if there is a single flat in the key signature, you are in the key of "F") I use the key signatures of other instruments' parts to figure out if ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible