11

These are jazz articulations, and as a french horn player you'll really just have to do your best imitation of what a trumpet player would do. You might want to ask a trumpet player in your ensemble for some advice and demonstration. What I'd suggest for the shake is a VERY rapid lip slur from the written note to about a fifth above. It's written forte, and ...


9

2/4 is isomorphic to cut time, and as the article excerpt states, they idiomatic french horn rhythm would occur on both of the upbeats in the measure. In other words, the second and fourth eighth notes of a 2/4 bar.


8

Conventionally, 1 and 3 take higher parts and 2 and 4 take lower parts. In many scores, horns 1&3 are given one staff and then horns 2&4 are given the next staff. I prefer that method, but you will see plenty of scores that group 1&2 and 3&4—however it will still generally be the case that the odd numbers have higher parts and the evens have ...


8

Bob has a lot of good information in his answer. I'll just add abit more here. As I'm sure you know (but I'll repeat for the sake of others, and for clarity), horn players tend to specialize in either higher parts or lower parts. They are typically notated with one "high" horn and one "low" horn per staff. So you usually have: Staff One: Horn I (high) ...


6

Okay, I just pulled out a few scores from my bookcase (looked at some Berlioz, Bartok, Stravinsky and Brahms so far…). In the scores at least, nearly all of the horns are written on two treble (G) clef staves. The scores are all transposing, so I can't see any reason why this wouldn't also be the case for the parts. I do know that horn parts are commonly ...


6

It's very different! The mouthpiece is smaller than a trumpet's, yet the instrument's range covers that of a trombone. And, while you can get away with playing flugelhorn like a trumpet, if you play the horn like a trumpet not many people are going to want to listen to you. My advice would be to essentially relearn the horn fingerings from scratch instead ...


5

Unless you're purposely writing in an antique style, for players who you know possess antique instruments, write for Horn in F. The instrument is fully chromatic. The player will very likely switch freely between the Horn in F and Horn in Bb which are combined in his modern 'Double Horn'. This is not your concern. I repeat - write for Horn in F. That ...


5

Db Piccolo Db Piccolo's first came about when bands began to be dominated by early brass instruments, and repertoires were adjusted to suitable keys for brass instruments - which created awkward fingerings for the old, simple system, C piccolos. (The simple system limited the keys the instrument could easily play in.) By creating the Db piccolo, piccolo ...


4

A harmonic minor sounds "Egyptian" or "Arabic" depending on how you use it. Use of the scale is deeply woven into the European classical music tradition. Occurrences of the scale in, for instance, Baroque music are not strikingly "Arabic" in mood. Here is an exmaple. The "Allemande" from J. S. Bach's E minor suite for guitar (BWV 996) has a quick, ...


4

It's to do with the origin of the instrument. In baroque times the horn had no valves. The way the player could alter pitch was with the lips and also with the right hand, which was pushed inside the bell. The left hand only helped hold the horn. The right hand could push further inside and cause the pitch to change, but with a much more brassy sound. ...


3

There are numerous F's in the score. On a natural horn these notes can be played open but very out of tune, or played stopped and in tune. Presumably Zinman wanted the horns emulating natural horns on modern instruments.


3

1 high, 2 low - and you can add 3/4 and 5/6, even 7/8 (e.g. Mahler), but always high/low, always in pairs. Solos often go to 1, but can also be covered by 3/5/7 etc. It might help to think of each pair of horns as a separate group, like pair of woodwind instruments. You can just add more pairs and occasionally have them all play together. Often the 3/4 ...


3

Horns have a very extensive range (From F#2 to C6) so it will depend more on the part itself. If the part is written in the higher range of the horn then a treble clef will be used. If the part is written in the lower range of the horn then a bass clef is used. Typically horns 2 and 4 will play the lower part and if it fits better in bass clef then it should ...


3

Cadenzas often have a slightly different musical style than the works they are based on -- for example, Joachim's standard cadenzas for the Mozart violin concerti -- but are not usually way off. For example, I wouldn't expect a cadenza in a Mozart horn concerto to include a bunch of pedal notes or lip glissandi or other techniques that were not commonly ...


3

This question is a little difficult to address for a couple reasons: 1.) A harmonic minor scale is a Western-European approximation of eastern tonal characteristics - much in the same way a pentatonic scale stereo types Eastern-Asian culture. 2.) "Traditional" Egyptian tonal materials do not fit into Western notation, so if you were honestly going to write ...


3

There's no evidence that cutting the bell makes any perceivable difference in the tone quality. If it did, professionals would go for one piece bells despite the (slight) inconvenience of a more awkwardly shaped instrument case. I'm not aware of any scientific studies, but many people claim a noticeable difference between a lacquered horn and an ...


2

Kunitz (1961) lists 16 versions that were in use between 1800 and 1850, from C-alto (unison) through A-basso (minor tenth below notation) and gives examples for their use. So the answer seems to be "only the A-basso one".


2

The blues is a largely guitar-based style, and there are characteristic blues things involving open strings that work best in E and A major (there ARE minor key blues, but I suggest you start off with the more common major variety) so players of Bb and Eb instruments in a blues band get rapidly accustomed to playing in lots of sharps! E major, (4 sharps) ...


2

'Stopping' on french horn is when you put your hand in the bell. This adjusts the pitch of the note and also has a muting effect. I am not an expert on this, however i found a good article on Wikipedia: This is the act of fully closing off the bell of the instrument with either the right hand or a special stopping mute. This results in producing a ...


2

How long a run and how good a player? A short run of 16ths at 152 bpm is no problem A longer run would be OK for a good amateur or above. He'll have played worse in etudes. This example isn't as hard as it looks. And if anything is holding your players back from emulating it, it isn't the mechanics of the valves. (Obviously, don't write concertos in ...


1

The transposing nature of the horn doesn't change depending on the clef. If a notated C sounds as an F, it always sounds as an F (until the next instruction like "muta in D"). Unfortunately, notation has historically been inconsistent with regard to the octave to play when in the bass clef. Some copyists assume that if a horn transposes down a fifth, it ...


1

It's a possibility. You sound very musical, turning your hand to many diverse instruments. And grade 10 pno is pretty good at 16 ( equivalent to above gradeVIII ABRSM).Although it's said that that level is only a starting point for becoming a pro. However, being a professional musician is far more than just having a passion for and playing music. Lots of ...


1

Aric's answer is mostly correct, except that l.v. stands for laissez vibrer (French), strictly speaking. In this context, it simply means to allow the strings to ring for the duration of the glissando (and perhaps for longer afterwards too, if indicated). I've not seen n.v. before, but I would definitely interpret this as Aric did - as an explicit ...


1

I'll add to the already good answers here that there are some examples of horn parts in the score being re-arranged to (sometimes) facilitate clef changes. Looking at the score for Mahler's Fifth Symphony, the first movement calls for 6 horns, and the parts are arranged differently in the score on a per-system basis. It begins with the parts grouped on two ...


1

Orchestral scores (as noted already) are usually 1-2 / 3-4, both in G (treble) clef, sounding a P5 lower than notated. Bass clef is not common, but neither is it rare. One thing to be careful of: there was an old custom of bass clef horn sounding a P4 higher than notated. Given that the whole idea of going to bass clef is to avoid excessive ledger lines ...


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