6 votes

Why Bb7#9 in 'Michelle' and not Bbm7?

The answer to your title question is: because that’s what Paul wrote and played. The fact is, and I’m a little surprised to say, it IS a Bb7#9. I always thought based on the melody and the fact that ...
John Belzaguy's user avatar
5 votes

Lydian harmony: What chords are tonic (T), subdominant (S), and dominant (D)?

Functional harmony and functional concepts like dominant and subdominant do not apply to modes, just to major and minor. Modal harmony is a separate subject and boils down to emphasizing the tones ...
Aaron's user avatar
  • 88k
4 votes
Accepted

Notes for simple progression

This is more an issue of aesthetics and "indoctrination" into the expectations of Tonality than a core music theory issue. I prefer B-natural to B-flat in the second melody, but I've also ...
Aaron's user avatar
  • 88k
4 votes
Accepted

Why prolongational instead of cadential progression

For Caplin, ultimately following the philosophy of Heinrich Schenker, a cadence in the Classical style requires a root-position V chord. The chord in the third measure is a V7, but because of the F♯ ...
Richard's user avatar
  • 84.5k
4 votes
Accepted

Can the subdominant move to the tonic in simple functional harmony?

The subdominant can move to the tonic, but this particular progression would be a tricky one because of the possibility of parallel fifths within the iii-ii-i progression. However, it wouldn't be ...
Aaron's user avatar
  • 88k
4 votes

Lydian harmony: What chords are tonic (T), subdominant (S), and dominant (D)?

V>I would be convincing, if functional harmony is what's needed, sound-wise, and will be a deciding factor to keep a piece in Lydian rather than Ionian. But there is no IV chord - it's ♯IV, and ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 193k
4 votes
Accepted

Why Bb7#9 in 'Michelle' and not Bbm7?

If we listen to the recording version (where the backing vocal in the mix is more audible) and look at what they are singing in this score, for the 2nd chord after the F, the backing vocal sings Bb7 ...
GratefulDisciple's user avatar
4 votes

VII7 to I in romantic era harmony

This style is not exactly my wheelhouse but what I see and hear is that even though the second half of the bar contains notes of an F7 chord (dominant not major 7, note the Eb), the low Gb is the ...
John Belzaguy's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Purpose of interlude in Bach WTK II, Fugue 16

It is an episode. If you find that modulation is an essential feature of an episode, consider that it begins in D minor, complete with C♯ and E♮ in the cadence, then moves to E♭, C♮, and B♮; then in ...
phoog's user avatar
  • 22.9k
3 votes

Can the subdominant move to the tonic in simple functional harmony?

That sub-dominant moves to the tonic at the end of every hymn in church - or it used to when I sung in the choir! As Aaron states, the plagal cadence. Your ii>I could be written with everything ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 193k
3 votes
Accepted

F#m7 chord in “Misty” in C major

What F#m does in C doesn't matter, because it's not in C anyway. A few bars before that F#m chord, the center of balance has (temporarily) shifted to F. Ok, what does F#m do in F then? Nothing, it ...
piiperi Reinstate Monica's user avatar
3 votes

F#m7 chord in “Misty” in C major

The score is correct. It is consistent with the common real book harmony, however see also https://music.stackexchange.com/a/110364/63781 Note, it's a jazz piece, which modulates perpetually. This F#...
user1079505's user avatar
  • 16.7k
3 votes

is iii7 a dominant chord with scale degree 3?

One way to approach the analysis is how the chord fits into the progression. In major keys iii often progress to vi, roots by descending fifth, working in the secondary/modal chords region. Of course ...
Michael Curtis's user avatar
3 votes

is iii7 a dominant chord with scale degree 3?

To be a dominant chord, it needs to first be a major triad; with a seventh, it needs to me a major triad with a minor seventh. If we assume you are in C major, the iii (E-G-B) is a minor triad. With ...
nuggethead's user avatar
  • 5,124
2 votes

Lydian harmony: What chords are tonic (T), subdominant (S), and dominant (D)?

The subdominant scale degree is a perfect fourth above a tonic and is the fourth scale degree. The lydian mode's fourth scale degree is an augmented fourth above the tonic. There literally is not a ...
Michael Curtis's user avatar
2 votes

Lydian harmony: What chords are tonic (T), subdominant (S), and dominant (D)?

I suppose that a II6-V-I may sound good enough cadence-wise. The Major II works as a subdominant (or, in my opinion, more accurately, a pre-dominant) in a Major key and thus may be used to emphasize ...
ttw's user avatar
  • 25.4k
2 votes
Accepted

How can I write a complex composite chord in Noteflight?

Unfortunately, there is no such feature native to Noteflight. Not only is the notation not natively supported in Noteflight, but the Unicode functionality required to display a capital D with slash ...
Ryan McKay's user avatar
2 votes

Is there a name for raising the v chord to a dominant V

The dominant chord is so called because the fifth degree of the scale. Normally, in traditional functional harmony, it's major. This arises because of conventions of chromatic alteration that were ...
phoog's user avatar
  • 22.9k
2 votes

Why prolongational instead of cadential progression

Hauser feels that the 2nd inversion dominant in bar 2 and the 1st inversion in bar 3 are insufficient to properly establish a functional dominant, they merely decorate the tonic. Having D in the bass ...
Laurence's user avatar
  • 92.9k
2 votes

Enharmonic Mediant

My first reaction to your question is simply you have used the wrong enharmonic spelling. Without any other context, and working with the basic description that the music is in mixolydian mode, the ...
Michael Curtis's user avatar
1 vote

Is there a name for raising the v chord to a dominant V

I'll gloss over a description of how common practice minor key harmony works vis a vis the dominant triad and just say that in such a context I would probably distinguish the two chords by name using: ...
Michael Curtis's user avatar
1 vote

Is there a name for raising the v chord to a dominant V

When I first encountered 'theory' in the 1950s, the basic minor scale was the Harmonic Minor, with its sharpened 7th note. V HAD to be major, otherwise how could there be a V-I cadence, the ...
Laurence's user avatar
  • 92.9k
1 vote

How to analyze introduction of Rachmaninoff's Paganini variation?

I would argue that chord labels and Roman numerals are less helpful for a passage like this one. Instead, I'd spot a larger pattern: that of the bass pitches for the first eight measures. F♯, G, A, B♭,...
Richard's user avatar
  • 84.5k
1 vote

Can the subdominant move to the tonic in simple functional harmony?

Yes, subdominant can lead to tonic. There’s even a name for it, Plagal Cadence. (And Amen to that :-) ii has a subdominant function, but it isn’t the subdominant. If as well as ‘functional’ you want ‘...
Laurence's user avatar
  • 92.9k
1 vote

What's the role of a bVI chord preceding a ii V I?

To me the second A7 does not function the way an A7 might typically function. It is more like a C#o/G resolving downward to the D#m7/F#. The A is more of a non-chord tone which is part of the semi-...
John Belzaguy's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

Unusual chord progression: I7-VIImaj7 (#VIImaj7 ?)

Disregarding the sevenths for simplicity, if you go from I to VII - meaning the tonic major chord to a major chord rooted on the leading tone - and you want to see functional harmony, an example that ...
Michael Curtis's user avatar

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible