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8

If fusion players sound to you like 'not in key' or 'playing random notes', then you're either listening to bad players or you're not yet accustomed to the sounds they use. The latter may also have to do with the development of your musical ear. I suggest to listen to good fusion guitarists (e.g., Alan Holdsworth, John Scofield, Scott Henderson with Tribal ...


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I'm no jazz player, but I've learned some tricks for laughs. This is only my own opinion, but the main idea is that what you play follows SOME LOGIC. There has to be a pattern, any pattern as long as it is a pattern that has an internal structure. To sound "outside", the structure must try and divert from the logic that the backing track is ...


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Fusion originated with Miles Davis's "Bitches Brew" album. Pat Metheny, Larry Coryell and John Mclaughlin are probably the avatars of fusion jazz, but there are many many other practitioners of the genre, including Martin, Medeski and Wood, Bird Songs of the Mesozoic and the "downtown sound" of Bill Laswell and John Zorn.There are very interesting ideas that ...


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Yeah, Frank Gambale! I listened to the first vid and was like, "wow, this guy would love Gambale..." lol. So, getting more specific and answering your (admittedly) very broad question: Harmony/Changes These guys are playing with the changes. That's because this isn't really pure "funk"(), it's fusion, which is really jazz with a rock beat (IMHO, don't ...


3

When improvising over standard changes it's important to understand the function of the chords in the progression. You need to see that Gm7-C7-Fmaj7 is a II-V-I progression in F major, and Bm7(b5)-E7-Am7 is a II-V-I in A minor. So if you know how to play over II-V-I progressions in major and minor you can improvise over this song. Over Gm7-C7 you could ...


2

Let’s take a look at an E11 chord (or an alternate name, an E9sus4). What do we have? An E root then assuming the 3rd is omitted (good move and usually done) B-D-F#-A or a Bm7/E, a 1 chord with 4 in the bass in Bm. The next chord, an E9 basically gives you a 4-3 voice leading between the two. Now in Bm the diatonic 4 chord is E minor unless you use the ...


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For context, my teacher is Lenny White, most famous for being the drummer in legendary 'fusion' group Return to Forever. If you don't know him, look him up - he is a founding father of the music, and was present when Miles created this 'fusion' sound. I'm a saxophonist. I'm 99% sure you guys don't have the rhythmic aspect. Getting your rhythm together is the ...


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An example technique is to play a secondary dominant. E.g. in the progression you mention, when you're on Am for a brief moment switch to E7. Then you can also add alterations to the dominant. You can also try with other secondary functions or extended progressions as well. A simple trick is to move everything you play by a semitone up, so from e.g. Am to Bb....


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On keyboard? You're currently using 'all the white notes'. Try using 'all the black notes' instead.


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To my ear, the two E chords are a temporary, direct modulation to E major. They take advantage of the root movement from G to F# and also serve to set up the bridge. (Note that jazz and blues allow for the interpretation of a major key even when the minor seventh is present.[1]) In a different context, E might be interpreted as IV borrowed from B major, but ...


1

I know what you mean, but there's no 'key of Bm7'. There's a key of B minor, and that's indeed where we seem to be. There's a simple and sufficient explanation that E11 and E9 are chromatic chords. That IS a thing! Some would be happier if we justified them as being 'borrowed' from some other key. Sorry, I don't want to look at it that way. It isn't ...


1

When improvising over a progression like this, you need to change scales when the chords change. Since all chords are of the same type, you can use the same scale (with a different root, obviously) over each chord. The appropriate chord scale is mixolydian, but especially in Lukather's solo I can also hear dorian over the first chord Gmaj7/A. Pentatonic ...


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Well, it's basically using the principle of embellishments with chords. For instance, using a Lydian over a I chord has one slight difference in tonality, but otherwise has "mostly" the same notes. This slight change(which is super common practice in jazz/fusion) holds together because of the other consonant notes that lydian and Ionian share. Now, when ...


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