19

Reverb and delay aren't completely unrelated effects - reverb can be thought of as a network of many short delays. While reverb can provide a realistic simulation of an acoustic space, using a lot of it will smear the effected signal in the time dimension, and tend to push it back in the mix, making it sound more distant. If reverb is applied to a signal ...


18

Reverb is actually the effect of playing in confined, walled spaces - the sound bounces off the walls giving a diffused sort of echo. In a wide open space there is zero reverb. I've never heard 'drippy'. But 'wet' and 'dry' are common terms when applying effects. The 'dry' signal is the original, clean sound. The 'wet' signal is the effect. When ...


17

The sounds in the songs you've listed are actually pretty different to my ears, but I'll try to generalize and go through some examples. Here is the raw line for reference. This is a modified strat with an EMG-SA in the neck position. This is important because EMG is an active pickup so the signal level is higher. This means it will distort sooner. So keep ...


16

It theoretically does not matter. Effects that are "linear" do not depend on order. Both reverb and delay are linear(in fact, reverb is a type of delay). Therefore the issue depends on the details. Pedals are not perfect and some different orders could potentially produce different results... but generally be close. Here is a scenario where order matters. ...


16

There's no reason not to try an effect if you want to. Sure, some kind of effect might mask some bad habits (reverb and delay might sort off mess your timing), but distortion for example is almost like playing another instrument, and if you're into punk/rock, the sooner you try it the better. You will have to figure out ways to mute the strings and reduce ...


15

A flanger adds a delayed version of the input signal back into itself. This produces a theoretically infinite series of equally spaced notches in the spectrum of the output signal (the spacing is 1/delay-time). Often this is referred to as comb filtering since a graph of the spectrum looks like a comb with downward pointing teeth. Usually flangers vary ...


14

Perhaps it was EBow. It amplifies string vibrations (using magnetic fields) providing very controllable feedback effect which allows to get very smooth and sustained sound. Also check out this video on Youtube. Although it is old it demonstrates very wide range of possibilities of this device.


13

No. A sustain pedal is a simple switch with a piece of cable attached that the keyboard uses to emulate the function of the sustain pedal on the piano - which basically means "let ring the notes when the pedal is depressed even if you lift your fingers off the keys". A sustainer pedal is a compressor, which is a thing that that limits the dynamic range of ...


12

Amp Simulator Although it is not really an effect in the sense it changes the sound before it enters the speaker, it is found more and more by digital guitar effect units. An amp simulator does what it says: it simulates a guitar amplifier, mimicing mostly famous guitar amps by adding a combination of effects mentioned earlier (like boost, distortion). ...


12

very simple answer... E-Bow I've had one for 30 years, there's nothing quite like it, but it is a technique in & of itself. You can do the standard 'never-ending note' by simply holding it over a string & sliding/hammering up & down the fretboard, but with a little practise you can make it sound like violin/cello spiccato by banging the string ...


11

Pitch Pedal / Whammy Pedal Although this might fit in the octaver pedal, it deserves a category of its own. This pedal raises or lowers the pitch of the incoming sound. Most models and emulation go from one octave below to two octave above. Lowering the pitch by an octave enables you to simulate dive-bombing without a floating tremolo for example. The ...


11

If you are are playing at high gain/volume, then you will need to mute any unplayed strings with your left-hand, or the palm of your right-hand to stop the strings feeding back. Good muting technique is essential when playing loud rock/metal. If at any point in the song you stop playing, or between songs, you can roll the volume pot off to mute the output ...


11

The short answer is yes, it matters. How much it matters, and whether it matters to you, depends on your pedals, the combinations in which you use them, and your desired sound. Here are some general rules that most people follow; nothing's hard and fast: Gain before synth. Effects come in two basic families. Gain effects alter the amplitude of portions of ...


11

Often called violining, either use the swell (volume) pedal or the volume pot on your guitar. Strat style guitars are pretty good for this, as Leo thought to put the volume control quite close to the strings/bridge, so a little finger can roll from palm to tip as you pluck the string. Then it gets rolled off again the opposite way, ready for the next note. ...


11

I believe that this is referring to where you would place your finger to get the desired harmonics. The harmonic that generates the major third is right before the 4th fret, which would be 3.85. 3.2 would be a harmonic near just beyond the 3rd fret, which should give you a D on the G string. This picture outlines the placement of the harmonics and the ...


10

Envelope Filter This effect gives a guitar that ska/reggae/funk sound. It works by varying the cutoff frequency of a low-pass or bandpass filter (the same filter that's in a Wah-Wah effect, hence the Envelope Filter is also called an Auto-Wah) using an envelope follower which watches the signal for amplitude changes. So it wahs your attack, and then gives ...


10

Things which sound good "in the mix" often sound bad outside it. Something to always consider when dialing in guitar sounds. Some things to think about. The guitar is a midrange instrument, always make sure that you dont scoop your EQ settings. Always EQ before distortion/gain. Distortion will naturally compress, and will effect the entire signal. You want ...


10

One way to get this effect is with an envelope filter. Then you will get it automatically, as the volume starts at 0 when the string is plucked, and then increases (with the correct settings).


10

Some effects (like wah or fuzz) work better* when they come before the preamp while some effects (like delay or reverb) work better* if they come after it. Yet some others (chorus or tremolo) can work equally well either way depending on the sound you're looking for. To provide this flexibility, most amps are equipped with an effects loop. It consists of an ...


10

The important part of a violin sound is a gentle attack at the start of each note. Some players use a volume or swell pedal to achieve this: the note is played just as the pedal swells the volume in. Others use the volume pot on the guitar. Strats and Teles are quite easy to do this on, as the knob is close to where the string is picked. Again, the string is ...


10

I have a somewhat unique approach to playing bass, much more aggressive lines and sometimes play what would be considered a lead line if a guitar was playing it (or other lead instrument). With that said, my current setup is as follows: Tuner pedal- Obviously used for tuning but can be very helpful to act as a mute. This is especially helpful if you need ...


10

Of course, it is a matter of taste. You're correct that a chorus creates multiple “voices”, but actually that's a good reason to put it after distortion! For distortion is nonlinear, which means that if you put in a combination of multiple voices, the result will be different from when you put each voice individually through distortion and mix ...


10

The dirt and grime that comes from distortion is a result of notes with frequency relationships beyond those that are very simple ratios (e.g. 2:1=an octave, and 3:2=a fifth) going through the distortion process together. This results in sum and difference frequencies being produced that seem only distantly related to the notes being played, resulting in an ...


9

Ring Modulator Ring modulation takes two separate signals and multiplies them. A ring modulator will typically take the input signal from an instrument and mix it with a second signal generated by an internal oscillator of which you can vary the frequency. When two sine waves with frequencies A and B are ring-modulated, the output will also contain the ...


9

Freeze pedal Sometimes also called a "granular synthesizer", this effect allows guitarists to infinitely sustain what they are currently playing on their guitars. Simple versions of this pedal are the Electro Harmonix "Freeze" pedal and the "Freeze" effect on the Boss ME-80 multi-effects pedal. A more sophisticated version is the Electro Harmonix "...


9

Wah-wah (or just "wah") This is effectively a foot-operated parametric equaliser. A frequency is determined normally by the position of a foot pedal. The input signal is boosted at, and around, this frequency, above the rest of the signal. As you move the pedal, the frequency being amplified changes up or down. The frequency range is set so that it sits ...


9

Looper A looper pedal or "phrase looper" allows a performer to record and later replay a phrase or passage from a song. Loops can be created on the spot during a performance or they can be pre-recorded. Some units allow a performer to layer multiple loops. The first loop effects were created with reel-to-reel tape using a tape loop. High-end boutique tape ...


9

Multi-Effects (Multi-FX or MFX unit) A multi-effects unit can offer a broad range of effects in one unit, including Amp emulation and speaker simulation. These effects are usually produced by digitizing the audio signal and using digital processing of the original effects produced by a Digital Signal Processor or DSP. Generally several effects can be ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible