New answers tagged

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slighly distorted, yet very clean and fat tone Sounds like a general Blues tone. On any amp or FX circuit, look for a "gain" or "overdrive" knob/function. If you have a circuit with "pre" and "post" gain options, you can turn the "pre" down and crank the "post" to overdrive the tubes naturally. On a Fender Blues Junior tube combo these are called "master" (...


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I agree with 3d12's answer. I just want to add that in addition to your local music store, one way to go, without totally breaking the bank, is to invest in a multi-effects pedal. Years ago, when I was starting off with guitar, I picked up a Vox Tonelab LE. It was a great, great tool for a long time. This sort of multi-pedal can be very customizable, I spent ...


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This is a great question. You're right that some guitarists get very specific about the type of guitar and amp that they use with specific pedals, but for your purposes, you won't need to get that in-depth about sculpting your sound right away. Once you start learning what different effects do, you'll know when you've outgrown the ones you have. So until ...


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Reverb is not typically called Wet nor Drippy. However, as others have said here. When applying effects be in VST or hardware, there is commonly the feature to blend the original (dry) signal in with the effected (wet) signal. A wet reverb in that since, may be the use of a reverb in a not-so-subtle way such, as the OP stated but not exclusively confined to,...


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"Dry" refers to the signal without any effects. This possibly comes from food terminology. If you order a "dry" sandwich, there won't be any mayonnaise. In that sense it means free of condiments; not drizzled in any sauce that adds flavoring. Wet versus dry refers to the degree of mixing of all effects to the dry signal, not just reverb.


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It is very hard to find good sources, but I think that the term "wet" came about from the fact that wet walls increase reverberation and there are some civil engineering books which speak about this as it relates to music halls. Dry then becomes sound with less reverberation. Architects should be aware also of the acoustic effects which dampness of ...


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In American restaurant vernacular, a food item without any added condiment [e.g. toast without butter] is "dry". If effects like reverb are viewed as audio condiments, sound without such effects would likewise be "dry". The audio term "wet" is a back-formation from the common use of "wet" as an antonym for the primary meaning of "dry". While buttered ...


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Beacause the sound is evocative of, what we stereotypically think of as, the sound of water dripping into a pool of water, .


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If you place your ear against a full bathtub or even stainless steel bowl and knock on it, the resulting sound will be very reverb-y. So maybe reverb is considered wet from the reverse. I think the terms wet or dry referring to effected or uneffected signals may be generalized from this, since reverb/echo was the first effect commonly used. Also, think of ...


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Drippy is sometimes used specifically to refer to the reverb effect in vintage Fender amplifiers. These were spring reverb circuits, driven by something like a 12at7 tube. The characteristic 'drip' effect was used a lot in surf music. The player would pick short, staccato notes using palm muting. Each note in turn would be routed through the spring reverb ...


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It's hard to discuss music or sound with words, so often we resort to metaphor. Never heard "drippy" but "dry/wet" is a typical label for the knob which is used to alter the mix of reverb ("wet") and un-reverb ("dry"). It has nothing to do with the actual presence of water (unless you use a swimming pool as a reverb chamber).


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From what I've read on reverbs, "dry" is the sound recorded directly from the source. "Wet" is the term for sound which has been reflected from the walls.


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Reverb is actually the effect of playing in confined, walled spaces - the sound bounces off the walls giving a diffused sort of echo. In a wide open space there is zero reverb. I've never heard 'drippy'. But 'wet' and 'dry' are common terms when applying effects. The 'dry' signal is the original, clean sound. The 'wet' signal is the effect. When ...


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Although I don't see many of them in use, Fender has made a separate spring reverb unit that usually stacked on top of an amplifier with a footswitch on the floor to engage or disengage the unit. It can be used to obtain the classic spring reverb effect without having to purchase another amplifier. I have one in my effects collection and it works very nicely....


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