8

Certainly! I've been known to play gigs on bass that way, but that's a much easier job than Bach fugues. Yes, whole pieces can be hammered on, although I wouldn't mind betting there are some plucked notes to make life easier. The point of hammers is that they should sound no different from ordinarily played notes anyway. Set up could involve a low action, ...


5

Depending on the type of tapping I use three mechanisms - For your Joe Satriani style tapping where you are using no open strings, I pop a handkerchief in at my first or second fret or thereabouts. This kills pretty much everything from that end of the string. On an electric guitar I also use a noise gate just to increase the level needed to be audible. If ...


3

First off, I've never heard of or experienced any disadvantage to playing with a metronome set to a slow tempo. Definitely do that whenever you're learning anything if you want to develop the best technique and timing. Regarding muting, you should be using both hands to mute. For the "fretting" hand, as you say, your first finger is one of your best mutes, ...


3

Fret wraps (or hair bands, basically anything that can wrap around a fretboard and mute the strings) are used to mute the open strings while performing a tapping passage. They are placed around the strings near the nut of the instrument to prevent the open strings from sounding. This limits the use of open strings during performance. A sponge mute can also ...


3

Mechanically, I can think of two options: Put a damper on the fingerboard between the nut and first fret that is so precisely located that the string only contacts it when it is being fretted, but not when open. Invent a new type of fret that has some kind of damping material on the nut side of each fret so that the string only vibrates on the bottom side. ...


3

From looking at Youtube videos of him playing it: yes, it's tapped harmonics. If you listen closely you'll notice that he also struggles to make them all sing (at least I noticed on the two videos I've looked at so far), so it's clear that they're not always easy to do. I find a light touch to be important to make them sing, and it takes practice to figure ...


3

From my experience & from forum surfing, I can confidently say that your pinky finger will always be weaker than the others. I have tried the following techniques and think that they can be used to help bridge the gap for you (aside from unfocused tapping): Tap softer with the other fingers and tap harder with the pinky finger, slowly and cleanly. ...


2

I was introduced to using a hair band by one of Andy James videos at licklibrary.com. Simply pull over nut of the guitar onto the first fret. Once installed it's easy to add and remove just by sliding it from the top of the neck onto the first fret. It's softly dampens / mutes the open strings but if you intentionally want to play an open note it will still ...


2

Man honestly... just do it real slow for a while. Accuracy is the most important thing so do it slow, get it right (building your finger strength all the while) and then once you have it down you can work on speed. (try a metronome and work way up to the speed you want). Plenty of free metronomes online and in the app store for your phone.


2

Picked harmonics are always more successful when plucked close to the bridge of the guitar. Love to know why!


2

In moments where you have nothing to do (sitting on the bus, watching tv), you could train your hands by tapping on you knee for example. You could also stretch your fingers backwards and try to counter that with your finger muscles to basically train them. Also, what really helped me building strength in my left pinky was starting to play the piano. I have ...


1

It could be that you're used to hearing your guitar played through a 'guitar amp' with a 'warm' sound. Heard through the clinical accuracy of recording monitors, the artifacts are more apparent. And that's why guitarists often mic their cabinets, or run the signal through an 'amp simulator'. Or it may be that you're listening to the recorded track by ...


1

There are a range of techniques. The most common are: damping using fretting hand: use the side of a fretting finger or an unused finger damping using the picking hand. If you are tapping, you will have spare fingers available, or the heel of your hand. wrap a damper around the neck and strings just above the nut. I use all of those techniques. The damper ...


1

If it's the fretting hand playing the notes, it's usually called 'hammer-on'. The usual strumming hand does it too, and that's often called 'tapping'. With fretting hand, as the name suggests, fingers are hammered onto the frets quickly and firmly. Can be done with single fingers, or whole chords. Accuracy is the name of the game, 'cos once the finger hits ...


1

In terms of pure strength training I do trills for each finger permutation on a random string. So if we assume 1 = index and 4 = pinky. I would trill with fingers 1-2, then 1-3, 1-4, 2-3, 2-4, 3-4 for a minimum of 30 seconds each (adjust according to strength and gradually buildup to 3 minutes or so). Furthermore, these trills would be nothing but hammer ons ...


1

It would help to do some stretches. I know these are for piano, but they will still help significantly. Practice makes perfect, so I'd suggest getting a metronome and starting off very slow. Make sure to hit every note accurately. Gradually speed up. If you get to where you can't do it anymore, slow back down. Don't push yourself as you'll only become ...


1

You can keep trying tapping for hours on end. You can also get one of these: http://www.physioroom.com/product/Prohands_PRO_Heavy_Hand_Exerciser/2334/39563.html?gclid=CMPLqtnV8MUCFWEOwwod-bMAtQ or one of these (which are particularly good due to the fact the little finger gets the most leverage and is therefore most likely to be trained while using this): ...


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