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16

In general, when you only have a limited amount of voices and you need to leave out a note in a chord, the Perfect 5th is the first to go. A Perfect 5th doesn't typically add a lot of color to a chord and thus typically when playing a chord it's viewed as OK to omit without changing the nature of a chord. I will say for this specific chord, there's no reason ...


14

Some tuning apps or outboard tuners have a transpose function which may have been inadvertently activated because all your intervals are off by a Perfect 4th. However, if you are not familiar with how a tuned guitar should sound then you may be off by that amount. Try comparing your guitar‘s pitch to this or a similar video to see if you’re in the ballpark ...


14

A full backing track has SO much more harmonic power, with bass and harmony instruments, it rules and bulldozes over your feeble little solo notes. Mode is not just a set of note names, because one of the notes is the King, home note, harmonic center of universe, the tonic. C Ionian and D Dorian have all the same notes, but a different center note. Mode = ...


11

Perhaps because singers are more likely not to have learned scales in such a formal way as guitarists, i.e. the names, the intervals between the notes etc. The fretboard on a guitar lays out a series of semitones for each string. A student guitarist will most likely learn at least some scales appropriate for the type of music they are learning. The voice has ...


10

The general answer is that pentatonic scales avoid some of the dissonances against the chords that occur naturally in the diatonic scales. For example, suppose you're playing over a C Major chord. Choosing to play a C Major pentatonic gives you the three chord tones, C E G, which are guaranteed to sound good, plus D and A, which are the chordal 9th and 6th, ...


9

It is common to omit a note from a chord, especially on a guitar, where 3-4 note voicings commonly sound the best, and also it's not always convenient to play all notes. In many cases perfect fifth is a note that doesn't add much to the chord and it can be omitted as in this case. So yes, this is a perfectly valid voicing of E7 chord.


9

From what you're asking, I believe you are making an assumption only based on your field of knowledge (guitars). As a percussionist, I could say the same for guitars, as that's not my field, and to my eyes and ears almost all guitars are the same: sometimes they have slightly different shapes or colors of their bodies, that's it. But I wouldn't, as I know ...


8

It sounds like you're new to the guitar, and there are a variety of things that could be causing the problem. Your best bet will be to go to someone you know who has guitar experience, or take the guitar to a music or guitar store, and ask them to check it for you: to make sure the instrument is set up correctly, that your tuner is working, and to help you ...


8

The most probable explanation is that you have tuned exactly one fourth down from standard tuning. The tuner does not know which string you pick, so when it hears a B, it shows that B string is played, when it hears a D it shows D and so on.


8

It is common to omit the 5th in a seventh chord. In the case of E7, that means leaving out the B. E is the root G♯ is the third B is the fifth D is the seventh Omitting the fifth is also commonly done in minor seventh and major seventh chords.


7

The chords in The Real Book (or any fake book) only tell you the general outline of the harmony. Playing them as given will not include the melody (except by occasional coincidence). To realize the music means to arrange the notes of the chords and melody so that they can be played together. The chord voicings you choose -- that is, the specific way you play ...


7

Imagine being completely deaf, not being able to hear what sounds you produce. With a well-tuned guitar, or piano, you'd still be able to bang out a tune, knowing which notes constitute it. But try singing that tune. Doubtful it'll be successful. Main reason is that there are certain places where the notes live on guitar (as in OP), whereas with vox, the ...


7

First of all, the question is about improvisation (or composing, which is very slow improvisation), deciding what notes to produce. If someone has already made all the decisions and written down the notes, then scales are irrelevant, except maybe from an instrument-technical fingering perspective. There are two main styles or approaches to improvisation: (1) ...


6

Pentatonics are so much safer! The two notes that are most likely to sound out of place in any chord sequence are the two omitted from the diatonic set - 4 and 7. A tritone apart (both ways). Those two notes are far more likely to clash with any chord likely to appear in common chord sequences. Without them, tunes using pentatonic notes do sound a little ...


6

You can make the note go a little flat by pushing it forward, since you do decrease the tension on the speaking length of the string. Test it yourself with a tuner and see how flat you can get the notes. It's easier to push the notes flat on larger strings and on wound strings. Now, it can be quite difficult to do, and it's certainly debatable whether ...


6

A musician who plays from notation probably doesn't NEED to understand scales, though practising them can be very useful for achieving dexterity and recognising the patterns that occur in what he's reading. Some singers may not read, but they generally learn songs by imitation, which comes down to much the same thing. But guitar seems to have attracted a ...


6

Scales have very much to do with finger patterns-- accidentals in piano, fret patterns in guitar. A singer doesn't need any of that-- they just need to know what sound they want to create.


5

First, replace the strings Old strings will not, ever, stay in tune. They physically can't, because of the way they degrade over time. Strings over a year old must always be changed, even if no-one touched the instrument in that time. (Instruments played regularly, you might only get a month out of a set. Pro musicians might put a new set on for every gig. ...


5

I think the impression you have comes from the fact you are looking at orchestra instruments. Orchestras need to be somewhat standardized, which allows them to perform a large variety of compositions. If every orchestra used completely different instruments, each of them would need to re-arrange compositions, while composers would never had an idea how their ...


5

I have this way of thinking about two different kinds of guitar feedback: -Gain based feedback -Volume based feedback I don't believe that's correct. When a positive feedback occurs the output signal of the system (guitar string → pickup → amplifier → speaker → air) comes back to the input of the system (guitar) and it is amplified again even more. This ...


5

Existing answer are correct but don't really address the question regarding why you hear it that way. That is a matter of training. While it is true that a P4 and P5 are just inversions of each other there is a natural built in tendency to use the lower note as a reference. This may have to do with how the brain is wired and a phenomenon called ...


5

Nothing specifically to do with guitar technique. It's a general musical instruction. Breath mark. Caesura. A brief time-out from the flow as if you were a singer taking a breath. It DOESN'T imply a fermata on the note before it though.


5

One basic reason is that in guitar (or piano — my background), one has to associate physical adjustments to sound (i.e., where to put our fingers) more explicitly than with singing. Playing a certain note or chord on guitar requires placing certain fingers at certain positions on the instrument; we don't think of things the same way with singing. So, at this ...


5

Playing a musical instrument is a physical skill which needs to be learned like any other physical skill. If you don't play a musical instrument of any kind then the physical skill to play a particular instrument will be completely new. You will have to learn from scratch. To that end playing scales is a useful repetitive exercise which gives you basic ...


5

We use our voices every day, and have since birth. Even the most precocious savants used their voices long before other instruments. Hear-and-imitate is how we learn language, which is one of the first things we ever learn. We can sing along with the choruses of songs we're hearing for the first time, but I've seen guitarists I admire struggle with playing ...


4

what other stuff should I know? You need a general knowledge of harmony. In particular: What notes are in chords What upper structures can you add to a given chord in given context (this is closely related to scales) Which notes of the chords are the most important for their harmonic function (on guitar chords played with 3–4 notes often sound the best, so ...


4

You are right, the interval of the second shape is a P4, not a P5. However, the relationship between the two notes is that the lower note is the 5th of the note labeled “R” for root, assuming you are thinking in terms of chord tones.


4

Option 2 is the traditional way and would still be considered the “proper” one by many engineers. Obviously though, the Frontman isn't exactly a boutique amp, so you shouldn't be surprised if this doesn't give results that are as good as what you hear on professional records. To go the amp route you should Have an amp whose sound you really like. Typically ...


4

They certainly aren't the same sounding. But if you mean fingering, then by leaving the top string open, and second string on the 1st fret, by moving the fingers on the 5th and 4th strings across one string (towards the floor), the shape is virtually the same. 4 or 5 strings played will suffice for each. However, if you mean the same notes, then no, they're ...


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