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34

Without researching the matter (and thus preserving Internet Tradition), I'd say that it's because the input energy to a guitar is a single pluck whereas a violin is bowed giving a continuous energy transfer. Pizzicato violins are not as loud a bowed.


12

You are asking for loudness, not volume, correct? Volume is refering to physical properties (i.e. the amplitude of the sound waves), whereas loudness is the perceived volume which can differ a lot from the actual SPL (sound pressure level), althoug the SPL is still a major factor. The loudness is also dependent on frequencies and bandwidth of the audio ...


10

There is no E# in the G# minor scale, but there is one in the D# minor scale. If you look at the chord that is being played, you'll see it's just a D# minor chord. So I think the best way of viewing it is that you momentarily get a little glimpse of the key of D# minor (which is quite "near" to the G# minor since they differ only in one tone -- the E/E#) ...


7

According to this post, higher-pitched sounds seem to the human ear to be louder than lower-pitched ones. In general, a violin is going to be playing in a higher register than a guitar.


7

First of all, it's important to realize that you've set yourself a very difficult goal. But from what I read in your question, I think you could improve on the way how to approach that goal. As you know, bebop is usually played at fast tempos, and the melodies and improvisations have a tendency to be complex. So bebop standards are usually not a good ...


6

The idea, that the the size of an acoustic instrument is an indication of its loudness is somewhat astonishing. It simply effects (based on trustworthy physical laws), that is maximum resonance frequency is in a different range. So violas are typically likely less loud than violins. As hinted in my comment, the material of the string can't be neglected ...


6

Those are octaves, it's a common technique. Either you mute the in-between string with one of your left-hand fingers so that the D string doesn't sound, or you don't use a pick and finger only the sounding strings with your right hand. One way to do the muting is to tilt the A string finger so that it touches the D string and doesn't let it vibrate.


6

The chord behind the lick is in D# minor. If he played an E, however, that would be a b9 over the chord- just a half step above the root. It's a cool sound that is used extensively in jazz and classical but not much in rock. It's pretty high in terms of dissonance. Instead, he uses the E# -- or F -- the natural 9 of the D# chord, which is much more ...


5

The answer by Ramillies gives a lot of context about the major 6th and the Dorian mode. However, for a single note, played twice in just one bar, you could simply consider it an altered note. It's OK to play "wrong notes" that are not in the key you're playing in. It happens all the time in music, and it works fine as long as it's played in passing, as it's ...


5

As I read through, it reminded me of one reason I have a mirror (8'x4') on the wall in my studio. Let's be honest, there are 6 strings, and the outside ones (the two Es) are easy to find. Leaving 4. With your plucking hand, presumably holding a pick, and resting just behind the bridge, you pluck a correct string. Let's say it's the G string, and you've ...


5

If you are picking with a plectrum, you often need to keep your right hand resting (very gently) on the strings you're not playing, so you can mute them. With this in mind, you'll almost always be touching at least one of the strings anyway, which gives you a good reference point. If you're fingerpicking, then you will typically have each finger 'assigned' ...


5

Practice without looking at the fretboard or strings too much. I don't mean to never look, but make it a habit to often practice without looking, or looking very little. This will develop your ability to play without looking. It might seem impossible at first, but for me, it was actually easier to play once I stopped looking all the time. Here are some ...


4

How loud an instrument sounds is not determined by its size. It's determined by the amount of coupling between the string (or whatever is generating the tone) and the air around the instrument. Compare an acoustic guitar with an electric guitar: They are both of the same size, they both may use exactly the same strings (though they prefer different gauges). ...


4

On an electric guitar with typical string spacing, it would actually be more difficult to play that without muting the D-string than with muting. Chances are, if you finger the octave just like you would the fifth in a two-string powerchord but one string higher, the index finger will already be resting lightly on the D-string and thus prevent it from ...


4

The objective is to play the notes on the A and G strings, which means there's a string in between, in the way. One way is to mute the string in between with a finger that's not being used. It simply touches that string, without pressing it down, so it makes a dull click, and that's it. Or, as I prefer, play the strings using either a pick and an spare ...


4

It's hard to point out whats the problem without seeing you playing. The best advise would be to contact a music teacher. They have the experience in teaching people and know what they are doing (and what you might be doing wrong). But I can give you some general advice on practicing: Practice time: Do you practice three hours straight? I think that is ...


4

"For each one of these chords, you need to choose a scale/mode/arpeggio, think of a melodic idea, and express it within the "shape" that corresponds to this scale." I hate to be the bearer of bad news but this has never been true of any type of improvisation. I think you have a common misconception that Jazz is an analytical pursuit. One in which you use ...


3

All forms of iron eventually rust. Pure iron rusts very quickly and visibly, within days if not even hours. The best stainless steel can go decades before showing the first signs, but it too will eventually rust. Everything else falls somewhere in between, depending on how it has been manufactured. (And in principle, the longer you want your metal to be rust-...


3

My main instrument is guitar. I have found that many popular songs that were written on piano (or keyboard) where the keyboard arrangement is the backbone of the recording - the guitar charts (guitar chords or tab) available online - often do not sound correct at all. As a composer and songwriter myself (who can't sight read standard music notation) I ...


3

A bend of a tone (two frets) shouldn't be enough to break a string. Unless it's old, or there's a problem with a fretwire or a saddle. .010s are pretty standard, and should bend quite easily up a tone and a half, on just about any scale length guitar. You ask 'how?'. Not by using one finger! Use two, three or even four. If they don't fit into the fret ...


3

For big bends you should be using as many fingers on that string as you can. When bending up a step, or even higher, I tend to put my ring finger on the target fret, middle and index onto the frets below, and then bend from the wrist by moving the entire hand To an extent it also depends on the guitar. If you are using 10 gauge strings on a guitar with a ...


3

If you want to reduce the amount of sound a violin makes then move the soundpost. If you want to drastically reduce the amount of sound then remove it altogether (but be careful of the bridge falling down if you do that). OK, not a serious suggestion to try on a good violin but it makes the point that the quality and amount of sound a violin makes is ...


3

Now, how to ensure I am pressing+plucking the same string? Are there techniques for that? There are. They are also the two most important things an improving musician can do. Listen carefully Practice a lot Your ears are the most useful tuner you have an they are inbuilt. Listen carefully and you will hear whether you pluck the right string or the wrong ...


3

No idea which videos you've seen, but if you're using one finger for a bend, it's going to be hard work. Whenever possible, use as many as you can - obviously those behind the fretted note are the extras! Consider whether you're going to bend the string towards your head, or towards the floor. Both work, but on top string, it's more common to bend upwards. ...


3

A few answers: I'd definitely suggest that yes, go ahead and learn a few solos you like. It'll give you many satisfactions and you'll learn a lot of useful things. If your strings break that often, it may be that you play a little too hard, or there may be some sharp edges on the bridge saddle, the nut, or even on some frets. This is common on cheap ...


3

My thoughts on whether or not to buy another amp or effects pedal: if it were me, I'd go down to the music shop and try out a few effect pedals and while I was there I'd play through a few different amps to see the differences in sound. At that point I might decide to buy a pedal or I might choose an amp. A third possibility might be that I'd choose to wait ...


3

The closer to the bridge you pluck, the better defined will be any harmonic. The smaller the fingerprint on the node, the better defined will be the harmonic. You don't even need to take your finger off immediately after you play the harmonic - which someone will probably tell you. In fact, you can put that finger back touching the string - at the node - ...


3

A friend who studied with Bill Charlap (renowed jazz pianist and teacher) once told me that Bill said this: You think while you practice so that you don't have to think while you play. With any new lick or technique, the goal is for our practice to move us through this natural progression: Initially, we plan out how and where to use the lick or idea ...


2

8 months is not a lot of time so don't push yourself to do something you are not ready for. I play on 11s and bend up to a Maj 3rd routinely, even a 4th. Jeff beck does a lot of very large bends. I will say that it will feel different on different strings. Rather than trying to bend on the high e string have you mastered bending on G and B? Common blues ...


2

Was having a go at recording 1979 during lockdown this week and found this little gem... not claiming any credit, this was from someone else in another thread, just connecting the dots :) “It's Billy singing 'today, yeah.' this apparently came about because he and Flood were humming this line together while doing some of the tracking. realizing that the ...


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