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12

They don't require a capo, they're just bar chords. IOW, you basically just use you index finger as a temporary “capo”. If you haven't learned full bar chords yet (they require quite some strength, especially the F ones when played on steelstring acoustic), you can approximate them with half-bar ones. For the Fm in the songs verse it's pretty much enough to ...


7

The diamond notes indicate harmonics. Basically you generate a note by lightly touching the string an integer fraction of the way down (like 1/3, 1/4, 1/5 etc.) so that instead of vibrating with the frequency length of the string it vibrates with the fractional length. In this specific example this is natural harmonic played by placing finger above 7th fret (...


6

Adding to Brian's answer: the instruction on top at that point is 'ar. 7'. Meaning play the 'armonic at the 7th fret. (Could well have been coined by a Brummie!). The diamond headed notes are the original notes, not the ones which will sound. Here, they are the bottom 3 strings, open (D-tuned bottom string). Making an A5 'chord', due to that being the 2nd ...


5

"Loco" means "in place", and in a musical context "at this exact pitch" and negates a previous "8va", "8vb" or similar marking. Guitar music sounds an octave lower than it is notated (the '8' under the treble clef on the left implies this, but it's not usually written). The notes on the right are the highest ...


4

This is tabulature-like notation of the chord written horizontally. So, e.g. x7x070 means: don't play the bass E string, play A string on 7th fret, don't play D string, play open G string, B string on 7th fret and open treble E string.


4

Quite probably it's because you are indeed muting that string. Look at your fretting hand. Probably some part of the finger is touching the adjacent string. Maybe it's another finger? Maybe some part of your palm? In order to prevent muting, try pressing the string with the tip of your finger, so that the last segment of the finger is perpendicular to the ...


4

This is anecdotal evidence at best, but my experience is that you get used to whatever is in your hand. My first guitar that was actually mine and not borrowed was a Charvel (owned by Jackson as it happens) with a very thin neck. It was of the "superstrat" type where it resembles a stratocaster generally but has aims to improve upon that with some ...


4

Probably not. The line on necks like this is that thinner and flatter necks are "faster". I don't know about that, but with rounder fretboards, you can tend to "fret out" on more extreme bends. There are compound radius necks which have flatter radii higher up the fretboard where you're more likely to bend. Personally, I like a hard V ...


4

My guess is it had nothing to do with the capo. The two most likely possibilities is the winding around the ball end of the string might have partially slipped or the string was improperly wound on the tuning peg. Another possibility is the tuning peg for your E string may be damaged or defective. If the string holds pitch after re-tuning you’re probably ok. ...


4

The 4-point joint was initially chosen, quite reasonably, to provided strength and solidity. As a consequence, the only way to change the action (distance between strings and neck) was to use the tailpiece saddles. It was as if the neck was glued to the body, like e.g. a Gibson, although you still had the option, if it was absolutely necessary to change the ...


3

In my experience no. I have several guitars, including a custom Jackson from the 80's. Based on your description it sounds like you are playing correctly, with your thumb on the back of the neck behind your fingers. This is the most important factor for avoiding strain. Playing with the thumb hanging over the edge of the finger board all the time, and ...


3

I agree with Tim. In addition when you are playing guitar your thumb must be behind the neck.This relaxes muscles and allows you to reach upper strings more comfortably. It might be diffcult at the beginningg but If you practice this way you will be more comfortable when playing other difficult chords/notes. Also here are some examples This one might help ...


3

If the signal is 5–10 dB below max in your DAQ it's good – you need that headroom for louder sounds. What is a problem that you need to crank the input gain to the maximum to get that. This results in amplification of analogue noise. Acoustic guitars are not very loud and dynamic microphones have limited sensitivity. This might be the best you can get from ...


2

I'm a guitarist who plays more piano now. One big difference is the concepts of music theory layout nicely and intuitively on the piano. You really need to know what notes are in a chord and which should be sharp or flat. A lot of times with guitar you can just memorize a pattern like bar chord or pentatonic scale and move it around, but piano this doesn't ...


2

There really isn't enough info to give an informed answer. It is most likely a fret buzz but your guitar may not need an adjustment. If you are hitting the string too hard you will make it buzz. Even on a $5000 custom guitar set up by an expert! If you dig in with all your might you will make it buzz. Also, If the frets are old you may have some ...


2

Could be a lot of different things. Let's make a check list: The obvious first: are all the volume knobs fully open? If the guitar is active (i.e. with a battery-powered pre-amp), did you perhaps run out of battery? In some (most?) active guitars, the pre-amp is automatically turned on when the jack is plugged in the guitar. That means, whenever the jack ...


1

A plane is defined by three points, so I'm not sure you gain much from the fourth screw, and your screw costs go down if you're using fewer per instrument. I don't know if having one more screw of tension is crucial; I've seen between 2 and 6 screws on old guitars on Reverb. But the key thing is that the change came with Micro-Tilt, which allows changing ...


1

Isolate that one pesky string/fret. Play it by itself. If that sounds fine, then it's not the guitar. It may well be that one of your fingers, or the fleshy part of your palm, is touching that string and muting it. Keep your fingers curved, so the tips press the strings, and the other parts of your fingers are not touching where they shouldn't. Hold the ...


1

Yes, I agree with what others have said above: the thumb is the culprit!!! Might try putting it near the center of the back of the neck, and in-between your two fingers, which should allow you to get that ring finger up to the fret, and stay on the fingertips too. And most importantly, like Nabla said: keep practicing! This will get that finger strength up ...


1

The 'key* of A minor contains more than the usual 7 notes found in usual scales. When people write in Am, they use notes A, B, C, D, E, F, F♯, G, G♯. Those extra notes show themselves in different minor scales and modes. The two Fs and two Gs are options which lend themselves to different situations, and are indeed options. Choose which you prefer. You might ...


1

Playing with F is the a- aeolian scale. Playing with F♯ is a dorian It seems you feel more “at home” in the dorian scale.


1

What comes to mind for me is fingering pattern, and is usually coupled with a qualifier such as chord fingering pattern or scale fingering pattern or melodic fingering pattern, these patterns are movable up and down the fretboard according to the root note of whichever key matches the particular song we are speaking about. The pattern in the picture appears ...


1

It is another way of writing out chords specifically to be played on guitar. Standard tuning, left to right is bottom string to top. There are only four notes played in each chord - the 'X' shows that particuar string is either muted (if strumming) or simply not played (if finger-picking). The 'O' means that string is played open. First chord is actually Em9,...


1

(x7x070) then (x6x070 and finally (x5x070) => 6 strings EADGBE There are for each chord 6 letters they refer to the 6 strings and the frets where they are touched: x = don't play this string (mute) 7,0,6,5 etc. = assign the frets where these tones are: put your fingers here, albeit 0 means open string You surely know the other chord notations like tab or ...


1

Not all scales have been given names, at least not commonly-known names.. The main two pentatonics are the Major pent. and the minor pent. Yours is a bastardisation of the two. Basically, given 12 chromatic notes to choose from, there could be many different 'scales' of five notes invented from them. Most will be not very useful.


1

You're outlining a C7 chord but inserting a "blue" note ahead of the E. I'd consider it a modified arpeggio. You could use it, for example, as the bass riff underneath a blues. You can also modify other arpeggios similarly. C-7: C-D-Eb-G-Bb C6: C-Eb-E-G-A C-7b5 #1: C-D-Eb-Gb-Bb C-7b5 #2: C-Eb-F-Gb-Bb Basically, take a seventh chord, and add a non-...


1

Another thing that might have happened: if you were tuning with the capo on, the combination of downward pressure plus rusty string may have caused the string to bind up in the nut slot. This would result in varied string tension between bridge and nut, versus between nut and tuning post. The action of playing may have helped unbind the string in the slot, ...


1

If it is as the other answer says, then loosening the truss rod would alleviate it, and there's no danger of breaking anything. The next simple solution would be to adjust the height of the bridge, using the screws on the saddles, assuming it's a Stratalike. There will be two tiny screws, usually moved using an Allen key, either side of the strings, where ...


1

It sound like as Tom said fret buzz. I think you should take your guitar to a local lutier instead of trying to fix it by yourself because truss rod is very easy to break and it is quite expensive to fix it. If you are not very experienced with it you should take it to a lutiher. Furthermore electric guitars are designed to play together with an amplifier. ...


1

As @ToddWilcox says, that is an advertised feature of the Steinberger Transtrem, but for the life of me, that looks like a Kahler bridge, which was Betamax to the Floyd Rose's VHS in the 80s. They still exist but didn't win. The midi pickup and tuning control remind me of a Strat that Fender released years ago, but I don't think that has much to do with the ...


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