Hot answers tagged

27

No, and for at least three reasons: Assuming "chord" to be a tonal entity, we can explain anything as having alterations, omissions, and extensions. With add11, ♭13, no5, etc., we can make sense of any combination of tones. We can understand harmonies as combinations of chords; such polychords allow any and all possibilities. We have systems of ...


21

If you are wanting to stick with standard tuning, then obviously there's no note lower than the low E in the open E chord - but as a chord, this D/F# (or 'first inversion' of D) might give some impression of being lower, partly because two of the strings (A and D) play a note that is a tone lower than in the open E chord: %2/.0/.0/.2/.3/.2/[D/F#] Here's a ...


18

Use a Drop-D tuning along with the traditional open D-major chord. Or alternatively try a DADGAD tuning and finger accordingly.


11

It's hard to tell from the images what it actually sounds like, as there's no time-scale, but that's the criterion I'd use - what it sounds like. Sometimes, a good groove is based on the average beat-centre provided only by the whole band, it doesn't rely on any single part. Listen to some early Stevie Wonder for a perfect example of this - try Superstition....


8

...How should I do this? You have to re-tune the guitar strings so that they are low enough to play the notes you want. The technical terms for this is scordatura although in common guitarist lingo it's usually called alternate tuning. ...I am writing a piece You need to know how to indicate it in your score. There are two basic ways: tab and staff ...


8

I think with younger children (below 13 or 14ish) it's important to keep clear and simple goals and discuss the goals openly with the student. Good small goals appropriate for a lesson are IMO things like: Learn one new rhythm pattern Learn one new chord Learn one new song (using known chords and patterns) Make that difficult chord easier to transition into/...


7

It appears that the top string has a problem on fret 14. The fretwire is too high. Or - fretwires 12 and 13 are too low. Either way, the string is sounding from 14 when pressed at 12, 13 and 14. Second string has the same problem. The third string is odd, in that with the same problem, the note heard should be A! It might be salvagable by raising the bridge,...


6

Action, to an extent, is due to the height of the bridge. Which does look like it could be lower. It's way higher than the bridges on my guitars, but I do like as low an action as possible. The strings look like maybe .011 - 054 ish, so again, there's not a lot in your favour for learning to play barre chords. They are heavy-ish and will present more tension ...


5

TL;DR: In sheet music, chord symbols are not a harmonic analysis of the song. Chord symbols are a guideline for accompaniment. It says "accompany this song with these chords". It does not say "after a rigorous and thorough music-theoretical analysis it is hereby declared and guaranteed that the following chord symbols are a complete and correct view of which ...


5

It hasn't six quarters in a measure. It's two separate voices written on the same stave. Tails up is one, tails down is the other. Justin is one of the better guitar gurus on the net - thorough and knows what he's up to. He's tried here to make the timing clear - you read it right - in that the notes fit in between each other, if you count 1&2&3&...


4

Don Latarski, in his (highly recommended) book Chord Embellishments for Guitar defines Benson Shapes as: I don't even know Don Latarski but if you think this is useful, check out his other chord embellishments and support him.


4

Depends on your definitions. There are certainly pitch sets that would be difficult (and pointless) to label in the 'C, Gm7, F#m7(b5)(b9)' naming system, or that defy functional analysis in the 'bii7 of iii' way. But some will say that ANY pitch set is, by definition, a chord. And, as @Richard says, any pitch-class set can be labelled.


4

The problem (difficult to solve with EQ) with "Bronze/Brass" Wound Acoustic guitar strings with magnetic pickups is the windings are not magnetic and therefore the magnets in your sound hole magnetic pick up can only detect the steel core deep inside the winding. Electric guitar strings are nickel wound and the nickel windings respond to the magnets in your ...


4

Using standard tuning, it's really not going to happen. To make it sound lower, the bottom string at least is going to be tuned to D, which means that any other notes played on that string then need to be fretted two frets higher, which may/not cause other problems. By tuning the whole guitar down a tone, but playing the rest of the song two frets higher, ...


4

One chord in one bar is a sort of compromise. Yes, every single note in that bar could have its own chord, but that, in the more listenable music, just makes things so busy that it's not listenable any more. So, looking at the main notes in a bar - 1 and 3 in 4/4 time - chord tones often appear on those notes. In a bar of C, the notes C E or G may well be ...


4

I expect that eventually he'll want to take lessons from a real teacher, but I can recommend some things you might be able to show him that will help him be able to play lots of simple songs quite easily. I started my son out by showing him the primary chords for the key of C, three chords in open position, C, F, & G. Then we worked up a song using ...


4

"tuning the guitars a similar way to the banjo" is a reference to open tuning, usually open G. This was relatively common in Blues and American old time music (from which skiffle was largely derived), and it's easy to play some basic chords for beginners on it too (easier to "get going", so to speak, whereas with standard tuning it's much easier to make ...


4

In principle, this is fine. You can even get purpose-made partial capos to do this job, such as those here. The only issue you're likely to have is if the capo isn't sitting evenly on the back of the neck, causing it to slip or to exert particularly uneven pressure on the 5 strings it is stopping. If this isn't happening, then you're fine. If it is, you ...


3

The top row is scales: x = this note is in the major scale [x] = this note is in the pentatonic scale red = this note is the tonic The second row gives you the transpositions: if I play the pattern at fret x, y is the tonic. Because the chart you found is based on the "CAGED" system, the root of the chord in a give finger position may not match the ...


3

Is there any combination of up to six chromatic notes that could not be classified and named as a chord? From the point of view of naming and classification, some would consider that groups/sets of 2 notes aren't named 'chords' as such: A chord is three notes? What do you call just two notes?.


3

One part of your research should always include looking at the manufacturer's web page for the product. In this case: https://www.ikmultimedia.com/products/axeio/ . You will see that on that page it states that the product has "2 rear combo inputs with phantom power to connect mics and line instruments". When you want more details, it's good to look at the ...


3

Barre chords are the bete noire of guitar playing! It usually takes a fair bit of effort to get all six strings sounding out cleanly, so it's no surprise you're struggling. Several factors are important, not least having your guitar in a state where barre chords can actually be played comfortably. This involves having an action that's not too high, and ...


3

According to this summary: https://andrewdiruzza.blogspot.com/2011/02/pat-martino.html ... the augmented triads are used as a "practical aid in visualizing twelve diatonic keys on the guitar in a horizontally smaller area on the instrument." You're not supposed to play the A augmented (if you don't happen to want an augmented chord). You're supposed to see ...


3

You've really got a couple of questions here: one about string lubricants, and one about whether calluses eventually get hard enough that it's not an issue. I've been a pro guitarist since 1976 (and yes, it's my full-time job). I never use string lubricants, and I'm not aware of any other pros who do. Fast Fret is marketed as a string cleaner, but I think ...


3

Using the E(m) and A(m) shapes, the chords in a key come in two L-shapes. Two of the major chords will be an E and an A-shape on the same fret (one of which is the I-chord), and then the third major chord is the E-shape 2 frets lower or the A-shape two frets higher (depending on which was the I-chord). The three minor chords form a similar L-shape. In a ...


3

..focus on the 6th and 5th strings [to locate roots] and use barre chords My guitar lessons where a long time ago, but my memory is this is what I was taught, even if it was explicitly explained. You don't even need to go up to the 12th fret. But, I feel like the result is my internal, mental map of the fret board is like this... ...there is a huge gap! ...


3

6 is pretty young to try and self learn from online videos, though not impossible I suppose. I do teach kids, but in groups. The youngest private student I've had was 13 when he started and stuck with me for 3 years until a move separated us (this was in the 80s so no skype). There are great kids books for learning guitar from Mel Bay and Hal Leonard, etc....


3

You know what 12/17 means: you play the note at the 12th fret and slide to the 17th fret. In this case both notes are important. But, when you see /17, this means that the first note is really not important. You slide into the note at the 17th fret, but the starting note is not emphasized; this is just an ornament or part of the way that the line is phrased....


2

The name for moving from I to III or I to VI or the like is "chromatic mediant." The normal movement is I to iii (though not necessarily very common). The chromatic mediant move is very smooth (common tone) and allows one to introduce "distant" harmonies quickly.


2

Assuming that after the B7 you return to chords in G major, as Dom mentioned, the ear normally likes the minimum number of note differences. If you are doing pop/rock type of music, I would suggest the E ascending melodic minor scale, { E, F#, G, A, B, C#, D# } to keep the number of new notes at a minimum while avoiding the minor third leap between C and D#....


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