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62

Per a suggestion, I am converting my comment into an answer. WARNING: math ahead (uh-oh, it looks like Music.SE doesn't support MathJAX -- I am going to go ahead and post the TeX code anyway and try to explain it in plain english along the way. I also added a meta request to see if we can't fix the MathJAX problem.) Discounting the inharmonicity due to ...


21

This line refers to the I, not to the "Allegro". As OP mentioned in the comments, the I stands for the first position, i. e. the first fret on the guitar. So the line means, that all notes under it have to be played in the first position.


21

The reason for the difference in sound is that the release of the string from the pick is faster than with fingers, which means that fewer of the upper harmonics are damped as the string is released. This gives the pick a brighter sound than the fingers.


17

The difference is caused by the different shape of the plucking implement. One easy way to verify this at home is to take your pick (same material and thickness), and pluck the strings with the back of the pick or the side of the pick. The tone will be different because of the different profile of the pick (pointed versus rounded). Also, the thickness of ...


13

As an addition to the other answers, here's the frequency spectrum of an open low E string of an electric guitar (a Squier strat with a bridge humbucker), strummed with the fleshy part of the finger, plucked with a fingernail, and picked with a plectrum (a Dunlop Delrin-500 .71mm). I played each note a couple of times and then selected one that sounded ...


10

You mute with your fretting hand. A way to mute a single string with your fretting hand is to place one finger on the string as if you are going to fret it, but don’t press with the finger to fret the note. Just keep the finger gently touching the string. It takes some practice to fret with one finger and mute with another, but once you’ve learned it, it’s ...


10

Not associated with the time change, just coincidental. On guitar music, there's often a Roman numeral printed to suggest a good position on the neck to play that section. Here, it's the scale of the F Mixolydian mode, starting from 1st fret bottom string. So a sensible position to play all the notes would be starting o that very fret. Although, promoting an ...


9

That looks like guitar music (single staff, G clef, Arabic numbers that make sense for guitar fingerings). If so... It gives you the position that passage is to be played in The Bb note in the preceding measure can't be played on any of the five lowest frets. Given the fingering for that note and the ones that follow, the music is indicating third ...


8

I'm porting this to the answer space just to have somewhere to hang the photo... It doesn't really constitute an answer, though it could become one once we have more info. I'd like to see another pic of more of the neck, because that is starting out at one heck of an angle; so either the neck is bent way out of true, or the action at the 12th fret is about ...


8

...what the Bb chords function is in the end solo as it alternates with the C chord? If it is just going like C Bb C Bb C Bb... then looking for function doesn't make sense. It's static harmonically. You can just call this kind of two chord alternating a vamp. Function in the traditional sense is about predominant to dominant to tonic harmonic progression ...


7

A lot of players found that where the guitar is when seated can be very different from where it hangs when standing. A simple solution is to change the strap length so that the guitar is pretty well in the same place for both - usually higher when standing. This has lots of advantages, mainly that angles don't change between sitting and standing, so you won'...


6

What are drop voicings? Drop voicings are formed by taking a close voicing and dropping certain notes one octave. A drop-n voicing drops the nth note, counting from the top, one octave. For example, a drop-2 voicing of a CMaj7 chord can be formed by starting with a close voicing C-E-G-B, i.e. a stack of thirds, and dropping the 2nd note from the top one ...


5

A few thoughts come to mind: 1.) Write every day. Not just every day for a year, but every day, forever. Gershwin would write a melody every day, knowing that he’d only end up using 1 melody out of 100. 2.) Don’t judge what you write too soon. What matters most at the outset is creating. After creation, then measure if it fits your vision. If it doesn’t, ...


4

It's flirting with things and keeping you in suspension. "Is this major or minor" and "where is the tonic" are the questions you're supposed to have. There are many ways to look at it, but here are two of them: (1/2) C is the tonic, and the harmony is alternating or staying halfway between C major and C minor, just like what you do in rock/blues/jazz. On ...


4

Acoustic and semi acoustic guitars are prone to this sort of phenomenon - feedback. It's caused by sympathetic vibration, where an open string 'hears' its own pitch, gets excited by it, and starts to vibrate in sympathy. It ay be the guitar itself, or something in the room, that picks up on that frequency. At that point, the two sounds egg each other on. ...


4

Even if you want to learn by yourself, or can't afford tuition, it's a good idea to take even just a single 1-hour lesson once in a while, just to get some feedback on your technique. If that's not at all possible, then closely examine how the online tutor plays the chords, and try to mimic it exactly, even if it feels more difficult than the technique ...


4

Taking a wild swing at this... If you are using a meter & it can't quite grasp the pitch, there are a couple of things you can try. Pluck the string with the soft part of your finger gently - fewer bright overtones means more fundamental frequency for the meter to listen to. If you pull the string too hard it will pitch-bend - it will start over-pitch [...


3

Having listened to the song, The final solo is C minor pentatonic To me it's C blues, with all the bends and blue notes that implies. The blues scale is in some places better expressed in terms of ranges though which notes can be bent, rather than specific notes. Also where does it come from if we are playing in C major? Again, I wouldn't describe ...


3

This is just an extension of @DavidBowlings answer - which really explains the drop voicing completely - with some visual charts. I had a little confusion mentally switching between the "standard" inversion of the un-dropped chord and the inversion of the dropped chord. I made a chart to get that sorted out and I thought I would share it here. Please let me ...


3

While Tim and Todd's answers are correct about other types of guitar music more generally, this arrangement in particular is acoustic fingerstyle, which has other considerations for notation - this is not strictly a palm or fretting hand mute. A distinctive element of this style of playing is the use of a range of percussive techniques to add texture to the ...


3

Songs have a melody that's harmonized with chords. A chord melody is an arrangement that places the melody note in the soprano of each chord (and plays individual non-harmonic melody notes above the chord of the harmony). On the guitar, that means choosing specific chord voicings that have the melody note as the highest tone. Take this simple melody (...


3

It does look high. This could be due to a couple of factors. The neck may be bent. All guitar necks have a slight bend in them - it's called relief - to stop the strings buzzing on any frets. But too much relief will give your symptoms, and is remedied in part by tightening the trussrod. Not recommended to be done by the inexperienced. The action may ...


3

The joke is that the answerer pokes fun at the stereotype of guitarists being unable to read music correctly, hence when two of them play from the same sheet music, they'd be horribly unsynchronised and playing different notes, thus producing the definition of "counterpoint" by accident. Not at all a true stereotype, if you're wondering, or at least ...


3

***** DISCLAIMER ***** I am not a doctor and this response in not meant to be medical advice. See a doctor if it does not clear up. My 2 cents: Having played guitar for ~45 years and having had some issues with various hand injuries I would say that the specific feeling in the middle finger knuckle you are describing reminds my of a pinched nerve. I get ...


3

Before we carry on - I think you have the guitar upside down. Not in reality, but in the way you name the strings. The thicker strings (usually higher placed on the guitar neck) are actually those that produce the lower sounds. That's where the root and bass notes are played. So - each ordinary chord, like simple majors and minors, have three notes. Because ...


3

On guitar, when we play a chord, we have the 3 notes forming a chord and then one (or two) strings add one (or two) more "bass notes" to the chord (lower pitches). When you play a chord on the guitar, all the notes are 'forming the chord'. We might say that a chord in the abstract has 3 notes - e.g. we might say that the C major chord contains the notes C, ...


3

This is part of the classical technique. The resonances of the other open strings help produce a full sound, see Carcassi's text. It is supposed to be there. The strings that resonate will have the plucked note as a natural harmonic so it should not be dissonant. However you do need to gently mute when moving from one chord to another and you will get ...


3

That is called "woman tone", really famous Les Paul tone.. You absolutly need the humbucker pickup on neck position (you can clearly see it in the video too), turn your tone knob down to somewhere between 0 and 2, volume knob at 10 and you are halfway there. Slash usually used high volume and a lot of gain on his amplifiers to make the tubes scream. You ...


2

Inversions are important because they affect voice-leading. And, when a chord sequence is not simply functional (not every sequence HAS to analyse in a 'circle of 5ths' way!) voice-leading becomes more important. As an example, consider the sequence Cmaj7, Dm7, Em7, Fmaj7. It's obvious how it would 'fall under the fingers' of a keyboard player - same ...


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