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4

Arguably, the learning curve is at its steepest when adjusting for the different size and dimensions of the new non-bowed string instrument, to the point where that might actually be the biggest factor for determining whether to continue with the new instrument. I had the good fortune to try out a guitar, an electric bass, and a ukulele at a local music ...


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TL;DR The strumming pattern you want is: Dudu DuDU dUDu DuDu 1e&a 2e&a 3e&a 4e&a Why is that? You are correctly interpreting the tab, but the tab itself is badly written. The specific note durations, explained below, are as indicated in the question; however, the notes are grouped in a way that is difficult to read. a straight vertical line ... which I'm ...


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As you say, C, E, and G make a C major chord. But those notes can be played in any order, and they can appear multiple times, and still be considered a C major chord. E G C is a C major chord; C C G E E G is a C major chord; .... As long as there aren't any notes other than C, E, and G, it's C major. This is true on all instruments, not just guitar. And it's ...


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The C chord comprises C E and G . That's all. So any strings that make any of those notes will be up for grabs. As you rightly say, some strings need fretting to make those notes, BUT others are already producing those notes while they're open. So why wouldn't they be left open to play as we strum that C chord? OP mentions only 5 strings! A lot of guitar ...


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I’m going to answer solely based on your chord progression of C to Bb. If that’s all there is the ear will likely hear the C as the I tonic chord and the Bb as the bVII. There is no F chord in sight so there’s no reason to think of this as V to IV. This chord progression sounds like it is derived from the C Mixolydian scale. You can’t necessarily say the ...


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It feels a lot less mystical if you think about it linearly instead of drawing lines on a circle. Like on a piano keyboard, or in terms of modulo arithmetic. Modulo arithmetic means dividing all results by a number and taking the remainder, for example 4+3+3+4 = 2 (modulo 12). Which means that the 9th in a 9 chord, which is 14 semitones above root, is the ...


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I don't think I have enough of a handle on this to create an proper answer, so take this as an extended comment, but I have heard from many older jazz musicians about this whole alternative way of viewing jazz theory, or some would say ORIGINAL jazz theory, that centre's heavily around the augmented chord. I've had it laid out to me at some point by a ...


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I'm not sure mapping each mode to a chord helps. When I learned the patterns for the major scale I just made scale charts on the finger board for each and practiced. The patterns on a guitar in standard tuning are what they are. There are a few things that might help. One is to know the pattern of steps and the tetrachords in the major scale. Breaking ...


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Strumming involves playing all strings (often) in one up or down movement. Ukes have 4 strings, guitars 6, more widely spaced, so the action is similar, but not the same. It won't take long to adapt when strumming. Finger picking is also different, in that the uke strings are closer, and there's only 4. So adapting will take more effort. Chord shapes - again,...


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This is a case where the question is probably more interesting than the answer. The answer, loosely speaking, amounts to "because that's just how it is." A similar question that comes to mind is "why is blues so often twelve bars?" That said, being a folk form, blues, like much folk music, adheres to fairly simple chords and form — so it'...


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Sounds like your problem is basically you are not good enough or quick enough changing chord shapes. It doesn't matter too much whether those chord shapes are major or minor, but you just happen to be weaker with, I guess, Am, Dm and Em. Which is strange, as all three shapes, on open chords, are actually easier to get to than C, F and G open! If you wish to ...


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In addition to the difference in physical size and the different (standard) tunings there are further drastic differences between the instruments you mentioned: The usage of plectra and the musical role of the instrument. These differences occur to some extent between all four mentioned instruments and are largest between the guitar and the mandolin: Both ...


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if there is a C Mixolydian(or F major scales), is the key considered as F major or C major? C major and F major are keys in the major/minor system. Modal music is a different system, and there are a few different modal styles. For practical purposes you can think of major and minor keys as "major mode" or "minor mode." In fact, in theory ...


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If you feel the tonality of a piece is C Mixolydian, and you want to talk or write about that tonality, the most concise thing to say is that it is in C Mixolydian. Simply saying that it is in F major will imply that F is the tonic, and if you say it's in C major, you lose the information about the mixolydian tonality. One of the unfortunate things about ...


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Am7 - D7sus4 D7 - Gmaj7 - E7sus4 E7 x 2 Diatonic to a key signature of one sharp, G is a reasonable tonic. The E7 is a secondary dominant to the Am7, assuming x 2 means the progression repeats. Root progression by fifths. Am7 Bm7 - Cmaj7 D7(9) - Gmaj7 Also a tonic of G. Note the root progression by steps, not fifths, I think that may be relevant to the &...


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Why is it so common to hold the I Chord for 4 bars? You give a link to variations on the blue chord progression, so obviously you know that the blues does not necessarily start with four bars on the tonic. Maybe your question is "why hold the tonic for so long?" Or something like that. Many blues songs are just riffs that repeat over all three ...


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It's probably more useful to reverse things, asking why it's got any harmonic variation at all. I mean, many times in modern music, you hold on one or two chords so that whatever is important at that time can do what it wants. You can reference modal jazz like A Love Supreme, but I'm thinking that metal riffage is sitting on one chord, and John Lee Hooker ...


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Two things: A fixed, straight fret guitar won’t really be ET anyway, because the tuning depends on more things than just the distance. Basically when you press down the string the tension changes, and depending on the diameter of the string the geometry might be a bit different. That being said, a decent guitar will be quite well in tune. The other thing is ...


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Perhaps the equal temperament interval that has the highest potential to sound out of tune is major third (or tenth or seventeenth...). However the top note in equal temperament sounds sharp with respect to just temperament, so in order to "fix" it one would need to lower the top note, not bend it. Trying to bend the bottom note would likely make ...


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Within the context of the derived chord progression, "the theory" behind it is the (re-)discovery of a core principle of voice-leading: the voices should move primarily by (whole or half) step. Once this chord progression is achieved, the relationship to the augmented chord becomes secondary, even though that was the starting point for its creation....


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This is just to confirm something already mentioned above. This kind of music notation, AFAIK, comes from Edson Lopes. In fact, in one of his (free) scores, Daily Technique, this is his very own note on (P6) "apoiar o polegar sobre a 6 corda", meaning "rest your thumb on the 6th string". Source: http://tinyurl.com/TecnicaDiaria


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The Nashville Number System is a direct translation of standard chord symbols in which letter names are replaced by scale degrees. For a piece in the key of C major: C = 1 Cm = 1m D = 2 Dm7 = 2m7 Eb = 3b EbM7 = 3bM7 F/A = 4/6 Fdim/G = 4dim/5 G7b5/Bb = 57b5/7b G#aug = 5#aug and so forth. This allows for easier ...


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I assume this is plucked guitar strings without any active muting. Hence the notes will continue to ring out, but won't really be "held" in the same sense the other instrument might do. I'm not sure why it's been written the way shown (as two seperate voice), but if you rewrite it as a single voice (removing the unnecessary tied notes etc.), it is ...


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(0 3) 1 & (0 2) 2 & 3 & (3 0) 4 &


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