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7

This is a relatively simple repair if you don't mind that the guitar doesn't end up looking the same as it did new: Drill out the damaged parts of the wood. Add a pickguard with the slot for the switch in the same position and the holes for the potentiometers in approximately the same positions. If you can't find a standard product that matches, you will ...


7

Yes - and no. Standard tuning will mean judicious angling of the bottleneck or whatever's being used. A perpendicular angle will give a minor triad on the top 3 strings, but moving it to an angle can produce a major one - albeit not spot on in tune.It'll also give a major triad (the relative major at the same fret, and the VII either 5 or 7 frets away)- ...


5

Most would play it as a 'power chord', using index on the A string, and ring and pinky on the other two. It's only like a basic barre E shape , but moved over to the next strings. If that doesn't work for you, then try index on A string, and ring flattened over the other higher strings. It does look strange, to a beginner, but a lot of us will use that as a ...


5

It's not possible, you need some kind of signal amplifier between the guitar and the phone. The guitar has huge internal impedance, so the input impedance must be around a megaohm to sound right. The headset jack has impedance of few hundred ohms, so it would need much more current than the guitar pickup can provide. Or less technically, the signal from the ...


4

It's generally OK to send a headphone output to a line-level input. You may need to adjust the headphone volume to a suitable level to get a clear low noise but un-distorted signal. A headphone output is generally much too high for a microphone input. It probably won't damage it, but the sound will be too loud and distorted.


3

This is of course up to you how you tune the guitar, but slide guitar players often use open tunings, to make the most use of the slide touching several strings perpendicularly. See e.g. What is an "open tuning"?


3

The toothpick is definitely the first thing to consider, but let me add to that. It sounds like your basic problem is that the hole is too big. Adding a toothpick can change the direction of the hole or cause it to be off-set. I would consider 3 options (just think of these as tools in your mind's toolkit). If the tooth pick is too large, use a sharp ...


3

I think Theodore’s answer of a custom pick guard is a good one but I have another idea that I think would also work. Maybe you can get two large washers similar to the ones used for the pickup switch on a Les Paul to attach over the holes and mount the pots on them. Find a diameter that covers the holes. This way more of the original finish would be visible. ...


2

There's a lot to playing slide that becomes much easier when you tune to an open tuning, especially when you're playing and accompanying yourself. However, a triad (root, third and fifth) comes for free on the second, third and fourth strings of a guitar in standard tuning, making it easy to jump between bottleneck and standard playing. You might want to ...


2

To answer your main question first: no, to my knowledge there isn't a unique curriculum or approach with learning disabilities in mind. There is a vast spectrum of learning disabilities, and you probably know best what techniques and approaches work best for you. There's one piece of advice, though, that helps everyone when learning theory, and all the more ...


2

It doesn't much matter whether you're talking about guitars, xylophones, or coffee tables. Here is a chart of densities of hardwoods: Wood Density Chart | Workshop Alder is listed at 400 - 700 kg/m³ (26 - 42 lb/ft³) The various species of Mahogany range from 500 - 850 kg/m³ (31 – 53 lb/ft³) There is substantial overlap between 500 - 700 kg/m³ (31 - 42 lb/...


2

Presumably, the guitar was set up originally as an ordinary playable guitar. Assuming nothing was changed surgically, there's no reason why its originality can't be re-instated. To obtain the higher action required for slide playing, first the saddles, or bridge would have been raised. Lowering it may involve replacement, but often adjustment is enough. The ...


2

Never had any problems leaving one string off for a short time, so I'd say it's o.k. Particularly if the guitar concerned has a trussrod. There is a way round it, though. Buy more strings than you need at that time - so you'll always have extra for situationss like this. Guitar strings are sacrificial - they're not meant to last as long as the guitar - and ...


2

It will probably be just fine for 2 weeks. You may want to loosen the other strings a bit if they have jumped sharp. (Not as likely with a fixed bridge as it would be with a floating bridge.) It's actually recommended to reduce the tension on a guitar that will be stored. For example, Fender suggests loosening all the strings by two half-steps.


1

Practice your scales, using fingerings that involve moving between positions as you would playing non-scalar lines. Eventually you will have muscle memory for the notes in each scale.


1

A couple of thing to try that might help with shifting positions quickly. Option one: don't In many situations, you can find ways to avoid needing to shift so quickly. Especially in the middle/lower range of the instrument, make use of the open strings in the middle of a line to give yourself more time to shift. This is often called pivoting or using a ...


1

Like the above said, take it to a luthier if you can. But if you want to mess with it, I’d suggest first checking where the string rests in the slot of the nut (usually made of bone). If it’s just that high E on the first couple of frets, try slipping a thin piece of paper, or something between the string and the slot, then tune it back up. If the buzzing ...


1

I find with 9’s I snap them too easily. I use 10’s and initially thought very low action would be best for me. I tried it, but just felt like I couldn’t get a good bite on the string, and sometimes It’d even slip out from my finger. I struggled to get good full bends for a while on the high E, too. I raised the action just a little, to where my ring ...


1

You can try filing the notches a little at the nut, and/or filing the saddle a little at a time, restring and test it. Do it in very small increments, or you’ll be buying new ones! Maybe try and tighten the truss rod?


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