Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now

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40

They are all nylon strings, but the bass strings have a thin layer of wound metal over a nylon core. All nylon string sets are like that, it's perfectly normal. Buy any standard classical guitar strings you like for replacement strings.


20

I would like to point out that you NEED to have nylon strings on a classical acoustic guitar. Attempting to put regular metal strings on it will damage or destroy it due to the much larger tension by those strings.


7

You mentioned that it's easier to use a capo on a guitar tuned to D-standard than it is to retune an E-standard guitar to D standard every time a song requires a low D. But if guitars all had D as their lowest note, that wouldn't solve the problem. People would still write for notes lower than the lowest D2; in fact, it could be argued that people might ...


6

Sure - but in general, you have to learn a whole bunch of new chord shapes. If you use Dropped D (where the E string is down a tone to D and everything else stays the same) than you can of course play everything the same on the top 5 strings. If you get more adventurous and try say DADGAD (check out Pierre Bensusan!) then you really need to learn new ...


4

You're trying to combine "parallel DC power supplies." It's not as simple as Lego, though, because typically one supply is a few millivolts higher than another, which drives the second one in reverse. If you're lucky, nothing catches on fire besides that power supply which, to its astonishment, has become a power drain. With a few diodes rated for that ...


4

NH and <> both mean the same thing. They're natural harmonics


4

In my personal experience (read: for my personal taste) amp cabinet sims in the Bias FX2 will sound bad fed into a guitar amp: they are better targeted to a full-range audio system. The pedal effects (etc) will otherwise sound fine. You will want to adjust your interface output levels such that with no effects defined, the audio levels are the same with the ...


3

You can usually step an acoustic guitar down to a lighter gauge of strings without causing too much trouble. The overall tension that the strings put on the guitar will drop, and you should have a lighter feel to the stings and a closer action on the guitar overall. Possible problems could arise if the guitar was strung with larger gauge strings, and the ...


3

Sometimes songs are written with the help of different tunings. Put them into standard, and they may well be impossible to play. And they wouldn't sound so authentic. The use of open strings in some tunings is their benchmark. That and particular voicings which would be tricky in standard tuning. So, basically, yes, a lot of stuff would work either way, but ...


3

Well, it's not quite arbitrary. The fact that it falls around E2 is somewhat arbitrary, but the fact it falls on a note called "E" has a very long (and convoluted) history. One relevant fact is that guitars (and their relatives like the lute and vihuela) rose to prominence in the renaissance. While a large variety of tunings were used for these ...


3

There is probably no need to change all the strings - unless they're a year or two old. Just replace the broken one, and if that new one sounds a lot brighter than the others, then yes, change all - one at a time. As piiperi states, all the strings are nylon, but the lower three are wound with metal to give them more density. Without that the nylon would ...


3

Practically, the 250mA output will probably be just fine. Try. It's a pretty poor power supply that can't cope with a nominal 12% overload.


3

I am not certain you will find a set of patches on the synth that really make the guitar sound like a synth. There's a fairly wide range of frequencies that a guitar can make, from about 82Hz at E2 (open, low E), all the way up to 1319Hz as E6 (24th fret, high E), on a 24 fret, 6 string guitar in standard tuning. You will probably not be able to find a set ...


2

This was a fun challenge. So after fiddling with this for a while and adding a bassline that kind of changes the function of the chords I actually put it in A Minor. Playing this on the piano, I basically played the listed chords in the right hand, with different notes in the root in my left, basically changing their function. So the chords on top are what ...


2

Try a dab of "Brasso" on a Q-tip. And I mean just a dab. Rub one end on a pole and then use the other end to clean it off. (I hope this lets you know just how little you need) Try not to let ANY drip into the pan, if you know what I mean.


2

What you are asking is certainly possible, but I personally don't think it'll be replacing regular cables any time soon. As some of the comments have stated already, there are a number of problems to keep in mind. Latency will probably be the biggest factor to deal with, because once the audio coming out of the amp is happening later than when you are ...


2

As user45266 said, the note E is arbitrary. It’s the most widely used because most songs are written on that but it’s by no means the only game in town. It’s common for metal guitarists to go all the way down to B. Guns N’ Roses usual tuning is Eb Ab Db Gb Bb Eb Some more popular tunings (in rock music at least) - drop D. D A D G B E - open D. D A D F# A D ...


2

Parlour songs, rather than campfire. There was an old tradition for people to sit around and sing popular songs of the day (and older songs) together, while the fire burned in the hearth. I used to play for these when I was alive (a long time ago), and consequentially learned a lot of good old songs on the way. Those were the days...


2

I think you mean "campfire songs".


2

From your description, I think it's a fair guess that you have "medium-heavy" 12s on there now. Anything heavier than 12s on an acoustic is pretty niche. Consequently, a set of 11s will be a little easier on the fingers without being drastically different. With a set of 10s, you'll start to notice easier bending and an overall lighter feel. With 9s, they'...


2

Along the same lines of what @Tim has said: These boxes are transposable--but in order to use them in other keys, it's extremely helpful to know where your root note is in all boxes. Sure, you may not know all of the notes you're playing, but if you're struggling to play in a certain key, you need to be able to construct your boxes around the root note on ...


1

One term that may cover the type of song you describe is "sentimental song." That is a term applied in song books from the early 20th century. The sentimental topics are usually things like dear, old mother's love, the beloved homeland, missing the home your grew up in, etc. If that isn't exactly the song type you are thinking of, there are other common ...


1

It works because it advances or resolves the melody faster than expected/needed, which is exciting! A lot of the pleasure we derive from music is from pattern recognition at first to learn the general structure, but also by being pleasantly surprised by creative deviations from that structure. Besides "pushing the chord," I've also heard this referred to "...


1

There is a close relation between music and physical movement, especially between rhythm and dance. This seems obvious and scientific research suggests that for humans it is a natural thing. (Search internet for something like "music and children" and, in any case, read Musicophilia by Oliver Sachs). I think it is key to understanding what makes your "push ...


1

"Why does it work" - the more general phenomenon behind it is syncopation. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syncopation Syncopation means playing something off-beat, and in order for that to work for you, you have to have a strong sense of on-beat. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beat_(music)#On-beat_and_off-beat How to make it easier to play? By developing ...


1

Anticipation. We expect the first beat of a lot of bars in pieces to be the strongest - that's often how we determine how many beats are in the bar anyway! So we expect a chord change on the first beat of a bar, but with push chords, they come earlier than expected. It sort of moves the song on, sooner than it would if the chord changed on the next bar. It ...


1

Your guitar is now a Bb guitar = tuned down a major second. The E strings are tuned in D and also all others are a whole tone lower. The notation is like you would read it if the instrument would be tuned in C. The instrument is transposing these chords from G down to F. This is quite the same like the music written for all Bb-instruments like trumpet, ...


1

There's also the 'chord symbols reflect implied tonality' clue. For ease and simplicity, it's all written as if the guitar is tuned to ordinary open G tuning, except for some reason, it needs to be tuned a semitone higher. I can't really understand why - it'll sound (to most of us) just as good in open G. It's good to have the proper dots as well, as it ...


1

It's written in G (look at the key signature). Essentially the guitar here is treated as being in open G, it's written in "G but not at concert pitch" rather than "in Ab", probably because the former is much easier to read and conceptualise. If I had to choose, I'd much rather read it this way too to be honest. When I'm playing a guitar in this tuning I'm ...


1

It's not possible to generalize, since the overall tone is shaped by many different variables (as Tim mentioned in the comments), and in the specific case of spruce vs cedar, the difference seems to be subtle. Given two identical guitars, one with spruce tonewood, and other with cedar tonewood, there will be differences in tone, albeit small. Spruce is the ...


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