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18

Reverb is actually the effect of playing in confined, walled spaces - the sound bounces off the walls giving a diffused sort of echo. In a wide open space there is zero reverb. I've never heard 'drippy'. But 'wet' and 'dry' are common terms when applying effects. The 'dry' signal is the original, clean sound. The 'wet' signal is the effect. When ...


14

Hi and welcome to the music stack exchange. I want to preface this answer by saying that metal is not an 'easy' genre to play well. As danmcb mentions, many many metal musicians are highly competent... and even formidable in their technical prowess. It is a bit of a misconception that metal is an 'easy genre to play' considering a good portion of casual ...


7

In American restaurant vernacular, a food item without any added condiment [e.g. toast without butter] is "dry". If effects like reverb are viewed as audio condiments, sound without such effects would likewise be "dry". The audio term "wet" is a back-formation from the common use of "wet" as an antonym for the primary meaning of "dry". While buttered ...


7

Yes, you could call it G9♭15, but it would be a pointlessly irregular usage of the chord naming conventions that music theorists (mostly) agree upon. So in reality, no one uses that name, not least in part because diminished fifteenths absolutely suck. The notes you name don't really have a standard, agreed-upon chord label, because that chord contains the ...


7

I'm glad you asked this question. There's definitely a lot to know about the world of guitars, and just by immersing yourself and asking questions just like this one, you will learn it over time. First of all, an acoustic guitar and electric guitar do the same thing. They make guitar sounds. You can play any genre on either, but most typically you will hear ...


6

Sure - but in general, you have to learn a whole bunch of new chord shapes. If you use Dropped D (where the E string is down a tone to D and everything else stays the same) than you can of course play everything the same on the top 5 strings. If you get more adventurous and try say DADGAD (check out Pierre Bensusan!) then you really need to learn new ...


5

It's hard to discuss music or sound with words, so often we resort to metaphor. Never heard "drippy" but "dry/wet" is a typical label for the knob which is used to alter the mix of reverb ("wet") and un-reverb ("dry"). It has nothing to do with the actual presence of water (unless you use a swimming pool as a reverb chamber).


5

You can do that with almost any electric guitar. That's what an electric guitar sounds like when you don't add any effects. You'll want to look for an amplifier that has a "clean channel", i.e. one without effects.


5

You've just made me pick up a guitar and do some bending! Personally, sometimes my thumb is in the centre at the back, sometimes it's almost over the top of the neck (close to the fat E), and sometimes it's not actually on the neck at all - it's pointing away from me, under the neck! You might have been told thumb in the middle of the neck is the correct ...


5

Lots of metal musicians are highly competent musicians, some are quite virtuosic. Basically, find a decent teacher, and start practicing. You will need to learn guitar and some music fundamentals about time, rhythm, harmony and so on. First learn to basically play the instrument, and then decide on a genre. Don't skip basics. (A good teacher should advise ...


5

I don't know of it having a name, per se, but the guitarist is essentially flexing the body relative to the neck by holding the neck firm and taking advantage of whatever play there is in the neck joint. This raises and lowers the pitch like a whammy bar but is much more subtle, like a very subtle all-strings vibrato. The player typically grasps the body ...


4

The negative rubbish I hear about 12 string guitars!! I have been playing one since 1967 when the 12 string was in the hands of the talented such as Pete Seeger, Roger Mcguinn and Keith Potger of the Seekers and they used it for everything solos, accompaniments and created sounds IMPOSSIBLE with the six string, which is a simplification of the original ...


4

I am not certain you will find a set of patches on the synth that really make the guitar sound like a synth. There's a fairly wide range of frequencies that a guitar can make, from about 82Hz at E2 (open, low E), all the way up to 1319Hz as E6 (24th fret, high E), on a 24 fret, 6 string guitar in standard tuning. You will probably not be able to find a set ...


4

As mentioned, this is a technique for finger style classical guitar. There are two types of stroke: tirando, or free stroke apoyando, or rest stroke Both are valid techniques and guitarists are encouraged to learn both. Some people think that rest stroke is "easier" but in realty neither is easy for a beginner and either can produce a strong full volume ...


4

what is it? In classical guitar technique, a rest stroke is when your finger plucks the string and comes to rest -- hence the name -- on the next string over. I assume the idea is the same regardless of which style you're playing. how does it affect the sound? The most obvious effect is that it will mute the string your finger lands on, if it was ...


4

Drippy is sometimes used specifically to refer to the reverb effect in vintage Fender amplifiers. These were spring reverb circuits, driven by something like a 12at7 tube. The characteristic 'drip' effect was used a lot in surf music. The player would pick short, staccato notes using palm muting. Each note in turn would be routed through the spring reverb ...


4

Unless it has an adjustable truss-rod, I wouldn't. The tension will be considerably less than steel strings & as a consequence the neck will start to drop backwards. The action will probably already be too low the first day you put them on, & a fortnight later will probably be nothing but buzz. Even with an adjustable truss-rod, you might find the ...


3

This is virtually asking for gear recommendations - which is offside for this site. However, it has more of the sound of an acoustic or electro-acoustic guitar than a solid electric. Most guitars heard on tracks have some sort of effects used on them, whereas this has maybe a little reverb and that's it. The sound of any guitar being played is contributed ...


3

From what I've read on reverbs, "dry" is the sound recorded directly from the source. "Wet" is the term for sound which has been reflected from the walls.


3

Along the same lines of what @Tim has said: These boxes are transposable--but in order to use them in other keys, it's extremely helpful to know where your root note is in all boxes. Sure, you may not know all of the notes you're playing, but if you're struggling to play in a certain key, you need to be able to construct your boxes around the root note on ...


3

On the assumption you're not including open strings anywhere, 'boxes' work fine on guitar. Basically, knowing the highest and lowest positions for a key in a box, you have a minimum of two octaves - plenty to be going on with. Take a riff or tune in a key you're familiar with, say A major. Play it through, then consider that if you played it in B♭, all ...


3

It's called transcribing. Basically you play the song back phrase by phrase and try to copy it on your instrument.It takes some time but with patience you can learn the entire piece. You may or may not choose to write down (notate) your findings as you go. In this piece there are a number of voices, you might work through them all. It is excellent practice ...


3

Sometimes songs are written with the help of different tunings. Put them into standard, and they may well be impossible to play. And they wouldn't sound so authentic. The use of open strings in some tunings is their benchmark. That and particular voicings which would be tricky in standard tuning. So, basically, yes, a lot of stuff would work either way, but ...


3

My first instinct would say its unrelated to the outage and more likely a ground loop issue. Have you tried taking your amp to another part of the house (or at least a new outlet) and trying to plug it in and see if it still makes the same noises? I know there are some product from EbTech and Furman (plenty others too) that are suppose to condition or ...


3

Well, it's not quite arbitrary. The fact that it falls around E2 is somewhat arbitrary, but the fact it falls on a note called "E" has a very long (and convoluted) history. One relevant fact is that guitars (and their relatives like the lute and vihuela) rose to prominence in the renaissance. While a large variety of tunings were used for these ...


3

What does it actually take to seriously play metal music? Practice. It isn't different than any other style in that regard. If you are serious, practice seriously. What kind of skills do you need? Fingering knowledge for chords and scales, and a good sense of rhythm/timing. The same as any other style. You can't ignore those fundamentals. Improvising ...


3

Take lessons. The path to accuracy and speed on any instrument is the same formula. Years of methodical, slow, meticulous practice of basic exercises with a metronome. There are dozens of great books, DVDs, etc out there for developing technique. But they are all teaching the same basic thing. You need to get the movements in your muscle memory and ...


3

One highly recommended approach is to play things slower... much slower. Cut the tempo in half and try to play it all with just as much expression/emotion. This allows you more time to focus on each note a bit more and forces you to play each note with more intention. Once you really, truly nail it at a slower tempo, move that tempo up in small increments....


2

As user45266 said, the note E is arbitrary. It’s the most widely used because most songs are written on that but it’s by no means the only game in town. It’s common for metal guitarists to go all the way down to B. Guns N’ Roses usual tuning is Eb Ab Db Gb Bb Eb Some more popular tunings (in rock music at least) - drop D. D A D G B E - open D. D A D F# A D ...


2

Parlour songs, rather than campfire. There was an old tradition for people to sit around and sing popular songs of the day (and older songs) together, while the fire burned in the hearth. I used to play for these when I was alive (a long time ago), and consequentially learned a lot of good old songs on the way. Those were the days...


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