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4

Everything Tim said in his excellent answer is exactly right. But I would like to expand on what he said for those who may encounter this question in the future and want a more detailed explanation. Almost all guitars provide some type of "compensation" at the saddle (part of the bridge) as a means of adjusting the intonation so the strings stay ...


4

If the saddles are staggered, it's due to intonation. One may think that each of the six strings ought to be exactly the same length, but from a physics point of view that isn't so. Due to each string being a different density, and gauge, each one needs its own speaking length, which when adjusted accurately will make each fretted note sound better in tune. ...


4

Short answer is 10th fret. Capo on the 10th fret makes everything rather tight and you may find that uncomfortable. Some other options are detailed below. If you insist on using the same chord shapes as in the key of D while playing in the key of C - you have two choices. 1) Put a capo on the 10th fret or 2) Tune your guitar a whole step flat and play ...


4

CAGED is a cute mnemonic. I think mneumonics too often substitute for learning a fundamental. CAGED is a bad idea instead of just learning two simple chord voicing concepts: closed voicing like an open C chord, and open voicing like an open E chord. (Unfortunately, "open" is a bit confusing in the previous sentence, it is used both to mean "open strings ...


4

The guitar frets are certainly anything but equidistant. We can use some simple physics to see how they need to be spaced. The frequency of the (fundamental = lowest mode) of the string is given by f = c/2L, where c is the speed of wave propagation in the string (some constant) and L is the length of the string. In the equal temperament, each step up a ...


3

Eric’s answer correctly identifies this object as a pickup, I just thought I’d add some extra info. This pickup is a magnetic-coil pickup, more commonly found on electric guitars and basses. Pickups for acoustic guitars are more usually Piezo pickups, which react to pressure, rather than the vibration of a string in a magnetic field. For this reason, the ...


3

Most likely a pickup with a smooth cover. If you look up the manufacturer and model of the guitar, you can find the specific info.


3

It'll be fine. It may feel loose, but it won't harm the guitar, and as a temporary measure, means you continue playing. Next time, make sure you have a full set as spares!


3

Based on my own experience playing guitar, and with Jarek.D agreeing in the comments, it's safe to assume that it's fret buzz. The amplitude of the sound indicates a large amplitude in the movement of the string, increasing the probability of fret buzz occurring. That, coupled with the lack of any other plausible explanation, makes fret buzz the clear answer....


2

If you start at an open string on your violin, and progressively finger each of the eight notes to arrive at the note one octave above that start note, you will have a finger exactly half way along the string. (From nut to bridge). Notice that each next step you take is smaller than the last. By the same percentage, actually. This time, measure how far re ...


2

To elaborate and visualize the previous answers a bit further, here's a legend: Amp/head: the device that amplifies the electrical signal. This is an electrical processor that does not produce audible sound. Cabinet: the actual speaker that speaks out the processed signal and makes it audible. The above two come in two main flavors: Stack: The amp and ...


2

There is a wide spectrum of rasgueados in flamenco. Perhaps the most basic aspects to consider are 1) wether the finger pattern matches the rhythmic pattern of the music, 2) the difference in sound between various strokes, 3) the final placement of your fingers at the end of the rasgueado and 4) personal idiosyncracies. Note: please note that in all the ...


2

It's quite possible! The mic, wired or wireless, will work with most amps, as mics (not powered ones though) should. Guitar amps are balanced, tonally, to give the best sounds for guitar, which has a unique pitch range, so guitar amps cater for this. Vocals won't sound as good as they should, but that won't stop it working. And being wireless - with a good ...


1

Just take a look at what he's doing. What he's saying is that you don't want to pluck the string by pulling it up and away from the top of the guitar. The initial action of the finger on the should be such that you feel the strings pushing your hand away slightly, like a spring. You push in a little. The follow through is along an arc that eventually ...


1

The action your fingers should take is a curling or an uncurling, not a push in towards the guitar as such. So for that stroke you can use the same action shown in the video - your fingernail or fingertip should be moving parallel to the surface of the guitar, either towards the lower strings or the higher strings. Curl and uncurl your fingers while moving ...


1

It is not desirable to use a wireless mic on-stage for a cabinet (it'd be a different story if it was handled, like a singer's mic). Unless everything is wireless, the stage will be full of cables running every which way, including power for amps, pedalboards, DI-outs to the main board, etc. The benefit of reducing clutter by one wire will not balance out ...


1

The best option is likely to re-learn the song either in C as-sounds without capo, or with capo 3. Capo 3 would allow you to play it with quite similar voicing and fingering to how you learned it in D, because it'll be mostly just one string down. The match is even closer if you tune the G string one half step down, so that the open strings are then G-C-F-A-...


1

Yes, as tiny currents will effect the pickup coils. They are specifically designed to detect small changes in a magnetic field. A way to minimize currents over the pickup coils is to strum or pluck below the pickups because the strings are grounded down by the bridge. If the guitar gas a pickup selector, you may use the ones further away from the bridge. ...


1

I the CAGED system as a way to visualize a schale/chord pattern all over the fretboard. Unlike the piano, which arranges all the notes from lower to higher, and clearly indicating which ones are "natural" and which one "accidentals" (ie: sharp/flats), the guitar has a certain geometry that seems to obscure this a bit. All you get are 6 strings, with 19 to ...


1

Why? Because new players are likely to have no strength in their pinky. As a beginner player, I somewhat ran into this today while learning G. My first reaction after struggling to even get it with my ring finger was to use the pinky. Seems much easier overall, but then again I've only had my guitar for 4 days so that's just my initial impression. It's a ...


1

Les Paul Jr's were built to a smaller scale when they were made originally, as an, entry guitar for children/teens/smaller adults. At the time, LP's were quite a bit more so many people started buying Jr's because of the cost difference. Because of this, Gibson ended up scaling the Jr up to standard size, which is what, we have today. AFAIK, Epiphones are ...


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