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7

As a guitarist, if I'm playing with a pianist, I usually do a couple of things. If I haven't played with them before, I'll usually lay off a bit in order to get a feel for how the pianist wants to approach the comping. I tend to adapt my paying around my bandmates when I'm comping. If the pianist wants to do some complicated rhythmic stuff, I tend to go ...


6

Generally pulsing a chord would most often be used as part of a rhythmic technique to lend a particular element to the rendition as part of the style of playing - or as part of the arrangement for a particular song that lends itself to the technique. The video example you shared is actually part of a fingerstyle technique of creating a bass line and ...


4

This is a tough call. Where on the finger board is not really helpful. The bigger issue will be two people comping simultaneously and having the rhythms clash. Do you have a Bass in the group? If not you could always play a sort of walking chord melody bass line in the lower register. That would fill up space and keep the steady groove going and act as ...


4

One highly recommended approach is to play things slower... much slower. Cut the tempo in half and try to play it all with just as much expression/emotion. This allows you more time to focus on each note a bit more and forces you to play each note with more intention. Once you really, truly nail it at a slower tempo, move that tempo up in small increments....


4

Take lessons. The path to accuracy and speed on any instrument is the same formula. Years of methodical, slow, meticulous practice of basic exercises with a metronome. There are dozens of great books, DVDs, etc out there for developing technique. But they are all teaching the same basic thing. You need to get the movements in your muscle memory and ...


4

Those 'words' are actually chord names. Most songs will have a chord or two that fit with the bar they're next to. In this case, Fmaj7 tells that the full chord is F major 7th, which cotains the notes F A C and E. The tab shows exactly that - F on the fat E string, and ACE on the top three strings. That couldn't be clearer or more accurate! The 'Am' word ...


3

Ahh the Neil Young classic "Heart of Gold". That is the song that inspired me to learn to play harmonica and guitar at the same time. It's just not the same without the harp solo. Many folk songs are played in what's known as "first position" on the harmonica which is they key the song is in. Most blues are played in 2nd position which a 4th higher ...


3

Sets of harmonicas can be purchased - all 12 keys in a big set! But big sets cost big money! You won't be able to use the 'standard' C, F, G, A harps well with your tuning - unless you capo or play barre chords for your songs, so you'll need the others out of the 'big set'. I'm guessing (have to - sparse info) that songs will be in E♭, A♭ D♭ ...


3

Wood-to-wood contact is ideal. I seriously doubt the stickers are making a discernible difference in sound, but YMMV. If you do decide to remove them, you may find that the tilt of the neck relative to the body has been altered -- it takes less than a millimeter at the joint to adversely affect the angle and therefore playability. Do this with caution and ...


3

With some rhythm patterns, it's necessary to strum chords that are very short in duration. It spices up the rhythm itself, and the simplest way to achieve it is to 'pulse' - hold down the strings, and momentarily loosen the grip to make that strum sound short. It works best on full barre chords, because all strings can be choked at once, with one slight ...


3

To answer your question of "why" it is added in the fingering diagrams, it has to do with convention. In jazz, a diminished symbol (°) is often shorthand for diminished 7 (°7) in sheet music even though that is technically imprecise (as explained in the other answers). I would say in this context -- ie not sheet music but something meant to be instructional, ...


2

B, D, F is B diminished. B, D, F, A♭ (or G♯) is B diminished 7th. This 4-note chord has a special property - it's symmetrical. It's a pile of minor 3rds. But add another minor 3rd - G♯ up to B - and we're back where we started! Bdim7 is the same notes as Ddim7 as Fdim7asAb dim7. And it's full of tritones - the augmented 4th/diminished ...


2

There is a difference between a diminished triad and a full diminished seventh chord. The dim triad is (1, b3, b5) but the full dim chord has a double flatted seventh (1, b3, b5, bb7). Strictly speaking the G# is not correct from the perspective of classical music theory as G is not the seventh of B but they are enharmonic so some texts may equate them. I ...


2

I play piano myself, and I recently played with a trio with guitar and bass for the first time. My experience, as a piano player, when having a solo, was that the tight, clustered left hand chords (Bill Evans) worked not so well with the guitar comping underneath. The alterations may clash, especially when the guitarist used tight voicings of his chords. ...


2

Don't play full 6 string chords, but partials (look at the LCJO tutorial on YouTube). Don't play all the time. Listen a lot. Listen some more to the Nat King Cole Trio with Oscar Moore or John Collins.


2

Find out where your guitarist likes to play on the fretboard, then go to a different register on the piano keyboard. What to do will be very different if the guitarist wants to play open-string voicings or spend most of the time somewhere above the 12th fret, an octave higher.


2

Engineer and musician's answer: Another way you can think about it is that when you fret up the neck, you are essentially creating "fatter" strings. Imagine fretting almost all the way up to the bridge; the segment of string would start looking like a barrel. The engineering answer is that the barrel has a different area to length ratio (actually area-...


2

When modulating by a half step, one trick is to exploit the enharmonic equivalence between the German augmented-sixth chord and the dominant-seventh chord. In A♯ minor, the German augmented-sixth chord is F♯ A♯ C♯ D𝄪; since this chord sounds the same as the V7 in B (F♯ A♯ C♯ E), you can easily resolve to B minor and strengthen the modulation from there. ...


2

That's the normal way to play a repeated note when the notation doesn't call for sustained notes or legato. Note that on, say, a piano, if you play a chord twice, there will be a silence because when you lift your hand, the dampers will kick in. To prevent that, you can use the sustain pedal. Then that becomes somewhat like the effect of strumming a guitar'...


1

The above answer is fine. I use the technique to give a "snappy" rhythm. Not for melancholy of serious songs, great for "Happy Birthday" and other lively music.


1

To silence the strings for a rhythmic effect, usually staccato. The tempo is unrelated, but often you'll find this heavily used in fast Funk and Pop rhythms with heavy syncopation.


1

If we're trying to fit everything into a functional 'cycle of 5ths' system, IV is actually a substitute for ii, V of V. ♭VII 'works' because it has two notes in common with ii. ♭VII7? Well, in a jazz/blues environment, you can add a 7th to just about any chord and it won't sound bad! There are similarities with the 'backdoor progression' ...


1

I sometimes write remixes of 1990's classic PC game music in GarageBand as a hobby - here's my workflow: Work pattern-by-pattern. Most of the music in question is formatted as tracker modules or MIDIs, which means each section (pattern) should have a similar instrument arrangement. Pick the individual instruments out individually. Start with the main ...


1

There are a few things he's doing with the rhythm. I'm not sure if there's a name for the whole effect, though. The slaps happen on beats 2 and 4, constituting a backbeat. There's a chord on beat 1 and a staccato chord on the last 16th note of beat one. This is sometimes called an anticipation. The bass thumps are on the last 2 16ths of beat 2, stopping ...


1

Without an fx loop in your amp you cannot bypass the preamp and so the main input is the only place you can plug the pedal into. Having said that you can still use the amp models if you want to. If you set your amp to completely clean with a flat Eq, you could use the zoom like it is running into the Fx return. Otherwise you could just use the effects on the ...


1

It takes precision to place the nut at the correct location, however, say a guitar neck maker were to produce in many or mass quantities necks for a certain kind of guitar. That maker would not have to be concerned with the exact placement of the nut. The maker would simply add a fret at that correct location (negligible cost) then install a nut behind it. ...


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