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40

They are all nylon strings, but the bass strings have a thin layer of wound metal over a nylon core. All nylon string sets are like that, it's perfectly normal. Buy any standard classical guitar strings you like for replacement strings.


37

We can tune each string/pipe to a given frequency as accurately as we need to for musical purposes. We can't do it so that they collectively satisfy several musically desirable properties, because it turns out our definition of those properties is logically inconsistent. The best technology in the world cannot fulfill a requirement that contradicts itself. ...


35

Without researching the matter (and thus preserving Internet Tradition), I'd say that it's because the input energy to a guitar is a single pluck whereas a violin is bowed giving a continuous energy transfer. Pizzicato violins are not as loud a bowed.


27

I'm sorry, but I'm going to have to vehemently disagree with some of the answers so far that want to make spurious claims that "left-handed people have an advantage when playing right-handed guitar/ukelele." Such claims are usually promoted by right-handers who have little experience with left-handed musicians. If you think about it just a bit, ...


26

Just like piano, you have to know the instrument to comfortably be able to form chords; unlike piano, most notes on the guitar can be played in the same octave at 3, 4, 5 locations on the fretboard. This makes it challenging to develop a mental map of the fretboard, and it may seem like a daunting project at first. Systems like CAGED (which I am frankly not ...


25

Some 'left-handed' modifications are worth fighting for. This one isn't. You won before you started! EVERYONE plays uke 'left-handed'. The left hand does the clever stuff, the right hand just has to strum. We will doubtless now hear some attempts to justify the political stance that left-handers MUST be separately catered for at all times :-)


23

"For each one of these chords, you need to choose a scale/mode/arpeggio, think of a melodic idea, and express it within the "shape" that corresponds to this scale." I hate to be the bearer of bad news but this has never been true of any type of improvisation. I think you have a common misconception that Jazz is an analytical pursuit. One in which you use ...


22

A guitar in standard tuning has E-A-D-G-B-E as the tuning of the open strings. That means that when you want to play a chord that contains any of these notes, you can play the open strings. Consider the Em chord: Em You fret the A and D string at the second fret to play the notes B and E, but the four other strings are already tuned to E, G or B, so you ...


21

Most instuments have key that are easier to play than others. With brass instruments, you'll see lots of pieces with two or three flats; if you go back to your beginner piano literature, you will find that much will be in C/ Am, or in G/ Em, or F / Dm. With the guitar, the "easy" keys are the ones that have open strings (E A D G b e) in their diatonic chords....


21

I would like to point out that you NEED to have nylon strings on a classical acoustic guitar. Attempting to put regular metal strings on it will damage or destroy it due to the much larger tension by those strings.


20

Why can't notes be tuned according to a defined frequency? They can. But what we can't do is tune them to "the correct" frequency, because there are different ways in which the 'correct' frequency could be specified. You've mentioned two of them in your question - just intonation, and equal temperament. As Kilian Foth's answer explains, both of those ways ...


18

Reverb is actually the effect of playing in confined, walled spaces - the sound bounces off the walls giving a diffused sort of echo. In a wide open space there is zero reverb. I've never heard 'drippy'. But 'wet' and 'dry' are common terms when applying effects. The 'dry' signal is the original, clean sound. The 'wet' signal is the effect. When ...


17

(To add to the other answers…) In classical music — that is, the common-practice period of Western classical music — we've developed the idea that a musical score should tell you everything you need to perform a piece exactly as the composer intended: every note and rest, all the speeds and instrumentation and structure, the phrasing and articulation and ...


17

The number one problem of capos is they usually throw off the tuning a bit and it’s a pain to fix the tuning with the capo in place. They also change the action - sometimes in good ways, sometimes in bad. The main reason a lot of guitarists rarely or never use capos is probably because capos are not widely useful. They only help in fairly specific ...


17

Album - definitely in key C - guitar using open chord. Live recording - using capo on fret 5, and playing C chord with an open G shape. Tutorial - uses open C, rooting on 5th string. All standard tuning - A=440Hz. In fact, the pitch is changing - for some of the chords' notes. Some will remain the same notes, in the same octave, but will be played on ...


17

The reason people in tutorials often cut the guitar strings is because they are often professionals whose goal is to change a set of strings as fast as possible. They aren't concerned with re-using the strings. But in your case, yes, you can definitely re-use the strings. Just unwind them completely instead of cutting them.


17

That's not a capo, that's one of your fingers! Those are called barre chords, and you use one finger to press multiple strings.


16

If you want to learn standards I would start by getting your hands on various versions of them being performed by great musicians. This is the best way to learn music, and style of music. Listen. If you can listen to the original versions. This should be an easy task with YouTube. 20-30 years ago I'd make a mixed tape, or burn a CD with 12 or more ...


15

Hi and welcome to the music stack exchange. I want to preface this answer by saying that metal is not an 'easy' genre to play well. As danmcb mentions, many many metal musicians are highly competent... and even formidable in their technical prowess. It is a bit of a misconception that metal is an 'easy genre to play' considering a good portion of casual ...


15

Never. C° is always C diminished. C major seventh can be signed with a triangle after the C. Bear in mind that half-diminished is signified by a circle with a diagonal line through it. Cmaj7 is C E G B. C°7 is C E♭ G♭ B♭♭. C half dim. is C E♭ G♭ B♭. Note: they all contain C E G B something.


15

First of all, it's important to realize that you've set yourself a very difficult goal. But from what I read in your question, I think you could improve on the way how to approach that goal. As you know, bebop is usually played at fast tempos, and the melodies and improvisations have a tendency to be complex. So bebop standards are usually not a good ...


14

This answer can hopefully be useful as an additional perspective on top of the existing ones. Note that the spectrograph is a plot of (the log of) power output vs frequency (power being energy per unit time). It appears that the fundamental harmonic has been "washed out" into the broad background at low frequency, and perhaps broadened (it's hard ...


13

An awful lot of guitar tutors , books and sites seem to feel that every guitar chord must be played in root position. In fairness, it is the most solid sound of a chord, in comparison to the 1st and 2nd (and 3rd) inversions. The open G shape, and open E shape chords automatically give root positions, and A shape and C shape give root if played from 5th ...


13

I'd say you haven't looked hard enough. But in guitar based songs (those originally written for the guitar, or for ensembles that prominently feature the guitar) they're going to be a little less common. Any instrument has keys that are going to be more comfortable to play in. For the guitar, those are G, D, A, and E - each of those has very finger-...


13

Any change in string gauge will cause a neck to move over time, unless you adjust the truss rod to compensate. Movement would be expected to have stopped & settled to its newly-balanced position within two weeks, with no other influencing factors. Primary shift would be within 24 hours. I think the advice you were given was rather limited; which makes ...


13

Yes, seventh chords are made up using 4 notes. 1,3,5 and 7. That's why they are named 'seventh' chords. But that's going to be too simple! There are quite a few different 7th chords, and the one you're asking about is the dominant seventh.It's actually a chord that belongs to key F, rather than key C. The B♭ note that's added to the basic triad doesn't ...


13

You should not master anything as a prerequisite for learning Jazz guitar. There is no hierarchy of styles. If you like Jazz start with Jazz. I would say the only real prerequisite is that you actually like Jazz as a style of music. If you don't you will never enjoy learning it and never play it well. Start by LISTENING. That is what music is, ...


13

It may look funny, but this is not an indication of a bad setup. Necks may be shimmed or set at a slight angle to achieve the proper action. Check if you have buzzing on any fret and if the action is appropriate. If it plays well, then it's fine. If there are problems with action or intonation or buzzing then you'll need a setup, but not just for the neck ...


12

Normally a shock from your guitar strings is caused by a very dangerous fault in your amp. In any case, no part of any cable should have enough of a voltage on it to shock you, so either your amp or one of your pedals is the problem. No matter how badly a cable is wired, it can't be producing any voltage. The shocking voltage is getting into the cable from ...


12

No, you are playing in C# min. The point of the capo is to allow you to use open string chord forms in any key rather than bar chords.


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