Hot answers tagged

65

Per a suggestion, I am converting my comment into an answer. WARNING: math ahead (uh-oh, it looks like Music.SE doesn't support MathJAX -- I am going to go ahead and post the TeX code anyway and try to explain it in plain english along the way. I also added a meta request to see if we can't fix the MathJAX problem.) Discounting the inharmonicity due to ...


61

The tuner does not hear what pitch your string is supposed to be at but only what pitch it actually is. If your string is more than a quartertone flat, it is closer to a C♯ than to a D. So your tuner then displays what kind of C♯ it thinks your pitch is. Presumably a somewhat high one (assuming you are not more than a semitone flat). So tune upwards. At ...


53

Some alternatives from the top of my head Double the guitar part on both guitars Double the bass part on one guitar Split the roles inside the chord: guitar 1 plays power chords (root and fifth only), and guitar 2 plays the third and the fifth or seventh, without root note. Split the parts rhythmically: guitar 1 playing kick/snare and guitar 2 playing "hi-...


49

Don’t practice. Don’t force yourself to practice. Play. Have fun with it. Start learning to play your favorite songs. Or make up your own music. Every time you pick up your guitar, do some kind of warm up exercise for five minutes max, then start playing your favorite song or inventing sounds or music, however well you can. Eventually you’ll be playing it ...


40

They are all nylon strings, but the bass strings have a thin layer of wound metal over a nylon core. All nylon string sets are like that, it's perfectly normal. Buy any standard classical guitar strings you like for replacement strings.


30

Why does it not matter what octave you're tuning to? If you want to set a string to a certain pitch, of course it does matter what octave you adjust the string to. Setting a string to A3 (220Hz) is not the same as setting it to A4 (440 Hz). Not only will the sound be different, but you might make the string very hard to play if it is too slack, or break ...


28

No, and for at least three reasons: Assuming "chord" to be a tonal entity, we can explain anything as having alterations, omissions, and extensions. With add11, ♭13, no5, etc., we can make sense of any combination of tones. We can understand harmonies as combinations of chords; such polychords allow any and all possibilities. We have systems of ...


26

It basically comes down to how the way the notes/beats are emphasised affects how your ear hears how the beats are grouped. Listening to a piece in 5/4, you'll hear that the beats are audibly in groups of 5. Try counting '1-2-3-4-5' with the beats in these songs, and you'll find that your counting stays in sync with the rhythmic pattern in the song... ...


26

Just like piano, you have to know the instrument to comfortably be able to form chords; unlike piano, most notes on the guitar can be played in the same octave at 3, 4, 5 locations on the fretboard. This makes it challenging to develop a mental map of the fretboard, and it may seem like a daunting project at first. Systems like CAGED (which I am frankly not ...


22

A guitar in standard tuning has E-A-D-G-B-E as the tuning of the open strings. That means that when you want to play a chord that contains any of these notes, you can play the open strings. Consider the Em chord: Em You fret the A and D string at the second fret to play the notes B and E, but the four other strings are already tuned to E, G or B, so you ...


21

This line refers to the I, not to the "Allegro". As OP mentioned in the comments, the I stands for the first position, i. e. the first fret on the guitar. So the line means, that all notes under it have to be played in the first position.


21

The reason for the difference in sound is that the release of the string from the pick is faster than with fingers, which means that fewer of the upper harmonics are damped as the string is released. This gives the pick a brighter sound than the fingers.


21

If you are wanting to stick with standard tuning, then obviously there's no note lower than the low E in the open E chord - but as a chord, this D/F# (or 'first inversion' of D) might give some impression of being lower, partly because two of the strings (A and D) play a note that is a tone lower than in the open E chord: %2/.0/.0/.2/.3/.2/[D/F#] Here's a ...


21

Most instuments have key that are easier to play than others. With brass instruments, you'll see lots of pieces with two or three flats; if you go back to your beginner piano literature, you will find that much will be in C/ Am, or in G/ Em, or F / Dm. With the guitar, the "easy" keys are the ones that have open strings (E A D G b e) in their diatonic chords....


21

I would like to point out that you NEED to have nylon strings on a classical acoustic guitar. Attempting to put regular metal strings on it will damage or destroy it due to the much larger tension by those strings.


19

It's the same as on a guitar. Harmonics occur at equal divisions of the string length. Half the string is the location of the 12th fret. This produces a harmonic at twice the frequency of the open string, which is one octave higher. Dividing the string into thirds, which is at the 7th fret, produces the fifth of the 12th fret harmonic. (Halfway between the ...


19

I think the confusion here is that it doesn't matter what order the notes are in. Think of a piano for second...you can pick any D, any F# and any A anywhere on the piano regardless of what order or how much space is in between the notes and you will still have a D major triad. You can also pick 2 or 3 of any notes and you would still have a D triad. Same ...


18

It depends on what exactly you want to practice. I feel like I've answered this before so it may be a dup. If you are a musician you can always practice your craft by singing. It may sound off-topic but it really is not. The ability to sing, and process short melodies in your head, is critical to playing any instrument. So, no guitar? Practice music ...


18

Use a Drop-D tuning along with the traditional open D-major chord. Or alternatively try a DADGAD tuning and finger accordingly.


18

Reverb is actually the effect of playing in confined, walled spaces - the sound bounces off the walls giving a diffused sort of echo. In a wide open space there is zero reverb. I've never heard 'drippy'. But 'wet' and 'dry' are common terms when applying effects. The 'dry' signal is the original, clean sound. The 'wet' signal is the effect. When ...


17

There is a kind of historic flow back and forth. A very long time ago during the Middle Ages - when parallel organum was way to harmonize - the perfect fourth was consonant. Later when triadic harmony developed along with counterpoint the perfect fourth was treated as a dissonance that resolved to a third. Later yet again, in modern time, the fourth is ...


17

The difference is caused by the different shape of the plucking implement. One easy way to verify this at home is to take your pick (same material and thickness), and pluck the strings with the back of the pick or the side of the pick. The tone will be different because of the different profile of the pick (pointed versus rounded). Also, the thickness of ...


17

(To add to the other answers…) In classical music — that is, the common-practice period of Western classical music — we've developed the idea that a musical score should tell you everything you need to perform a piece exactly as the composer intended: every note and rest, all the speeds and instrumentation and structure, the phrasing and articulation and ...


17

The number one problem of capos is they usually throw off the tuning a bit and it’s a pain to fix the tuning with the capo in place. They also change the action - sometimes in good ways, sometimes in bad. The main reason a lot of guitarists rarely or never use capos is probably because capos are not widely useful. They only help in fairly specific ...


17

Album - definitely in key C - guitar using open chord. Live recording - using capo on fret 5, and playing C chord with an open G shape. Tutorial - uses open C, rooting on 5th string. All standard tuning - A=440Hz. In fact, the pitch is changing - for some of the chords' notes. Some will remain the same notes, in the same octave, but will be played on ...


16

You may not know enough yet to practice longer. If this is the case be patient. So first of all 20 min is a respectable about of time for a beginner. The key to steady improvement is that you do this every single day (with some exception for vacations etc). Like going to the gym, you body (and mind) needs the constant reinforcement. So don't just ...


15

It's just a finish. A "natural" finish is basically clear, meaning you see the natural color of the wood. No stain or burst or anything, just a clear, usually glossy, coating.


15

Generally I would have only one guitar play during the quieter parts and both guitars play the same thing during the loud parts. Often this means both guitars play during the chorus and only one during the verses. For instance, in "Smells Like Teen Spirit", one guitar would play the intro, both the opening chorus riff, then one guitar plays the verse and ...


15

A perfect fourth is considered consonant when it appears as an inversion of a perfect fifth, which is itself a consonant interval. This kind of perfect fourth more or less unavoidable in any practical polyphonic arrangement, where the root is often doubled and the fifth is somewhere in between. A perfect fourth is considered dissonant when it appears as an ...


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