New answers tagged

1

Whatever you say is likely correct, but in a documentary Jeff Beck shows a letter he got from Mingus praising and thanking him for his version. I believe the doc is called ‘Still on the Run’.


-1

The answer is because of Standard Tuning ... the guitar is not being tuned in all-fourths. Guitars and similar instruments are tuned in some variant of fourths (or fifths going the other way) to accommodate the 'modern' (18th C.) "diatonic" music theory. (Four fingers, four frets ... the fifth fret matches the next string's open note. With six strings this ...


0

I think what would be a much better solution is a preamp with EQ designed for piezo pickups. The lack of low end is inherent in piezo pickups especially when they are not connected to a preamp with the right input impedance. I would look at pedals from Fishman and LR Baggs and any related brands to find a piezo preamp with EQ and ideally an XLR output. Then ...


0

First off: I have no idea what the technical/real term for the technique is. However, if I'm understanding your question correctly, what he's doing is transitioning from a slap on the low E to a Bass and strum thing. But, I don't really hear a "twang". I think that might just be from the hard attack that he does, but it doesn't sound like he's going for "...


1

The guitar's standard tuning is centered around G major. If you consider the open strings of standard tuning - EADGBE - those tones are used in C, G, and D major. All other keys require a sharp or flat on at least one of the open strings, so you can't use all the open strings in those other keys. From that point about the open strings, consider that the ...


-1

Short and sweet: yes, there are reliable and formulaic ways to form chords on the guitar. Observe that you can position your left hand not only at the top end of the board, but at any position. Yes, you do have more strings to care about when you're not at fret #1 (i.e., the open strings are not so much relevant), but aside from that little complications, ...


2

Whilst teaching, your technique will improve at the same time, and you'll learn and understand things better at that same time. It's serendipity! However - that's not what you should be considering during the lesson. Your student isn't there to help you improve - you're there to help him improve! Any extra learning that need to be done by you ought to be ...


4

My reaction was the same as David Bowling's comment: If I was a student, I'd want my teacher to be focusing on what I was doing during the lesson and thinking of the best way to help me improve as quickly as possible. Even while accompanying the student, you'll want to be focusing on checking every aspect of their playing and planning the next bit of ...


1

Occasionally I'll look for a guitar tab and when I find it, I discover inaccuracies by the boatload. That leads me to believe that guitar tabs are sometimes compiled by folks with a less than complete understanding of what they are doing, that is to say, a few basics under their belt and they feel ready to submit their contributions. There are more of these ...


10

I'd say you haven't looked hard enough. But in guitar based songs (those originally written for the guitar, or for ensembles that prominently feature the guitar) they're going to be a little less common. Any instrument has keys that are going to be more comfortable to play in. For the guitar, those are G, D, A, and E - each of those has very finger-...


6

Certainly a lot of easier guitar parts are written in keys that make guitar playing easier. That's the point! A lot of studies - Carcassi, etc., are written in keys which allow open strings to be held as pedal notes to accompany other more intricate parts to be played on upper strings. Thus keys of E, A and D (and their parallel and occasional relative ...


17

Most instuments have key that are easier to play than others. With brass instruments, you'll see lots of pieces with two or three flats; if you go back to your beginner piano literature, you will find that much will be in C/ Am, or in G/ Em, or F / Dm. With the guitar, the "easy" keys are the ones that have open strings (E A D G b e) in their diatonic chords....


3

The most basic way is knowing Barre Chord Theory. Barre Chord Theory is a subset of CAGED theory. Where we take the A and E forms and use barres to create chords across the neck. The A and E forms will give you the major chords, the Am and Em forms will give you the minor chords. Where you place the barre will determine what the chord is. The E forms are for ...


2

This answer won't probably please you too much, but I think there is only one way: Do it. Then do it again. Then again. Then again. Then again. And so on. The left hand just needs to get used to the fact that it has to stretch sometimes. For example: when I was a child just starting with the guitar, the standard G major chord shape was a total nightmare for ...


4

With enough practice, it's doable in that position, even if you don't have huge hands or very long fingers. You could practice it first in an even higher position, and then work your way down to the correct position. As a last resort, you could exchange fingers 1 and 2, i.e., use the second finger on the A string and the first on the high E string. This is ...


5

In Europe, stringed instruments (harps, guitars, violins) have used strings made from animal gut for millenia. The lower strings of a guitar were sometimes made with gut wrapped around a silk core. Here are the icky details.


4

There is already a lot of info here but here's some more. "Formulaic"? Do you not like practicing? The guitar is a bit of an enigma because of the plethora of ways to do the same thing and all are important. First: Rote learning is not a bad thing. In fact many researchers in the field of consciousness would argue that rote learning is what leads to ...


2

If you really want to learn a formulaic method for constructing chords, check out Pat Martino's system for constructing chords from augmented and diminished "parental forms". I don't use it, and I don't know anyone who uses it, but it's the closest I can think of to what you seem to be asking for. Pat Martino chord concept - Augmented Forms - Guitar ...


6

In the abstract, of course it's true (as it is on any instrument) that moving the third in a major chord down a semitone will give you a minor chord. Practically, there are times when this is straightforward on guitar, times when it's a little awkward, and times when it's impossible. A 'straightforward' example would be moving from E to E minor: We can ...


4

Due to the way guitars are tuned, just moving a string one fret lower, etc., can work sometimes, but not work in other cases. Firstly, changing a chord from major to minor is, as you state, leaving root and fifth, but dropping the M3 down to m3. It will work with some major chord shapes! Take the basic open E shape, which can be moved up with a finger ...


24

Just like piano, you have to know the instrument to comfortably be able to form chords; unlike piano, most notes on the guitar can be played in the same octave at 3, 4, 5 locations on the fretboard. This makes it challenging to develop a mental map of the fretboard, and it may seem like a daunting project at first. Systems like CAGED (which I am frankly not ...


0

E2 is what I’ll consider a problematic chord spelling that has been sooooo commonly seen until it’s become acceptable. Some definitions: Esus2: E F# B, the 3rd (G#) is replaced by a major 2nd Eadd9: E G# B + F#, a major triad extended by adding a major 9th (3rd is still present) E9: E G# B D + F#, this is a dominant chord, ie the dominant 7 (D) MUST be ...


2

Playing in front of an audience has almost nothing in common with playing at home with family and friends, so stage fright sets in and you tense up. Not only that, but your hyper- critical ears kick in and you hear things about your own playing that you never noticed before and often it throws your concentration off. It feels somewhat traumatic when it's ...


6

The best way to write for an instrument you are unfamiliar is, is to work together with whoever is going to be playing the part. Start by writing the piece as you imagine it, in a way that you think will work. Then show this to your guitarist and get them to play it for you. You'll get plenty of feedback on what works and what doesn't, and things you can ...


-1

I am guessing you can play a basic A just fine. 'A' chords has three notes; A, C# and E. As long as you play those, in any order, you're good. I usually play x07655.


2

I've always thought Strats sound best with a good gap. Too close & you can really hear the magnets getting in the way; strings will over-pitch more if you get too close at the low end - you hear the pitch fall slightly after the initial attack. I've always gone with "If it falls off the thread you went half a turn too far, otherwise you're good to go" ...


2

How to make better tone? / Pickup height secret! 1.3k upvote/45 downvote Basically start at 2-3mm gap on bass side; 2mm gap on treble side. ADDDENDUM .... FENDER SAYS: Set too high, pickups can cause myriad inexplicable phenomena. Depress all the strings at the last fret. Using a 6" (150 mm) ruler, measure the distance ...


1

Instead of 123 you can use 234 another possibility is to play A6 by laying the finger (don’t mind which one) or A7 by playing the 1.string in the 3rd (counting from the capo): A6 will fit as subdominante substitution for f#m (ii) for songs in E or tonic in A. A7 as dominante in D or subdominant in blues in E (would also fit as tonic in a blues in A.


1

If you are trying to replicate exactly the fingering in your chart at the 12-th fret and beyond it may not be possible. By the way the fingering you have is only one of a few ways to play it. You can bar the three notes with the first finger and either avoid playing the high e string, use the pinky on the 5-th fret e string to get another A. You can also ...


4

The frets get very close together after the 10th fret so there is no way I would be able to use 3 fingers to play the open A chord as shown in your diagram. What I would do is use my middle finger (between index and ring finger) to "barre" the 3 strings and bend my finger up to avoid contact with the high e string. This is what I do when playing an A ...


7

This is an interesting question. Before finishing the entire description I would have opted for your technique is not up to par and you are getting fatigued. However, you point out that this does not bother you at home and that it starts right away on stage (after the first pinch). If this is solely a performance anxiety issue it's probably psychological. ...


3

To be honest, the fingering you have pictured is the way I'd do it - with the index finger pulled back behind the other two, so that you aren't trying to get any two fingers exactly side-by-side: On really high frets though, I probably would just be just laying my finger across all the strings, as David Bowling suggests & as shown in Rockin Cowboy's ...


1

E2 seems a vague way to name a chord. Could be construed as piiperi says, which ought to be called Eadd2, or, it could be Esus2, where the M3 of E is replaced by the 2nd note ( F♯). If there were some E4 chords also I'd consider they could be Esus4, where the M3 is replaced with the P4 (A). Whether it actually means add2 or sus2, there's the second ...


0

You can select "file", "export" then select "Midi". Then open that newly saved midi file. All the fingering is gone. If the song contains a Capo, you need to remove it before saving as a Midi file but have it keep the fingering, this is done under Tuning.


4

An "E2" or "A2" chord most probably means an "add 2" chord, where a major second note is added between the root and third of the chord. For example, E2 might be played like: 024100. Add2 chords are often used in so-called "praise & worship" music. Maybe even so often that someone might consider it a cliché, but hey, genres are made of clichés. Edit: as ...


0

You can play the open A string when playing some songs with the D chord to get a fuller sound or in country songs like Good Hearted Woman by Waylon Jennings and Willie Nelson. You can go along with the bass line of the song,which you pick the D string open and then the chord; than the A string open and then the chord.This is a root-D, 5th-A strum pattern in ...


-3

Quick answer: Just for "clarity". Root being the lowest is "standard" on guitar playing Long answer: As many other fellow guitarists pointed you out, there's a lot of ways to play the same chord. In this specific scenario we are facing, A is a note on this D chord, so, it can be played and it won't cause any trouble. But, bear in mind that most of the time, ...


0

Most teachers/writers are attempting to teach "solo guitar", and a "D chord" on solo guitar needs a D in the bass most of the time. "A" is definitely a D chord member, but to play it would have the guitar sounding (and is generally notated or spoken as) "D/A" or "D Major, 2nd inversion". Such a chord is also of significant musical use but it's not the same ...


0

There is no reason you cannot imitate a cadential 6/4 chords progression and end on a D chord in second inversion ie with the open A in the bass and have it end on the A chord. This may be a bit next level for an intro course to handle but it is in essence sound theory. The further away a chord goes from its root position the more unstable and 'weaker' it ...


6

It is common to teach beginners chords with the root in the bass as a first introduction. However inversions and alternate voicings are perfectly acceptable. Since the low open A string is the 5th of the D maj chord it is not offensive to put it there. The same is true for the lowest, open E, string and the C maj chord. E is the 3rd of C and it is fine ...


3

Is it because it's considered important for the lowest played string to be the "titular" note? As other answers have said, in general a 'D' chord doesn't have to be played in root position (with a D as the lowest note). However, root position often will be what is wanted: It generally has the strongest, most consonant sound The root position chord will ...


11

An awful lot of guitar tutors , books and sites seem to feel that every guitar chord must be played in root position. In fairness, it is the most solid sound of a chord, in comparison to the 1st and 2nd (and 3rd) inversions. The open G shape, and open E shape chords automatically give root positions, and A shape and C shape give root if played from 5th ...


4

Indeed. You play it like that to have the D in the bass. You can of course play the A string (and even use your thumb to fret an F# on the E string) if it fits the arrangement, but then the chord would be considered an inversion. But it's more or less standard to play the open D chord on four strings and the open A and C chords on five strings, especially in ...


1

My advice is to try and think beyond the guitar neck. You can learn the underlying patterns of the major scale (and by extension all the notes) as it appears on the guitar neck (or any instrument tuned in fourths). As an experiment, tune your top two strings up by a semitone, so that they're c and f (now the guitar is tuned in fourths all the way), and get ...


0

It depends on whether you're more interested in the sound coming from the amp, or the sound going to the audience through the PA. I have found that in the venues I play in the main speaker sound in the venue can't really distinguish between independent pedals and multi-effects boards when it comes to sound quality.


17

(To add to the other answers…) In classical music — that is, the common-practice period of Western classical music — we've developed the idea that a musical score should tell you everything you need to perform a piece exactly as the composer intended: every note and rest, all the speeds and instrumentation and structure, the phrasing and articulation and ...


7

For the example you provided there is no way to decipher the strumming pattern from the lead sheet. This is like a real book, just an outline of the basic song structure. Some books have strumming patterns in the front or in an appendix. One of my students has a book like this for a different band/artist and there's about 20 strumming patterns in the ...


5

Yes. Song copies aren't full performance scores. Listen and copy. And the Beatles' guitars did a lot more than just strum! You might find this book interesting. Someone DID attempt a full transcription of everything the Beatles did, and got it pretty right! A bit of an eye-opener for those of us accustomed to the approximations of the usual song ...


5

The sheet music is there as a basic blueprint. It tells the words, the melody line, and the chords. Sometimes even the bass pattern, if there's a full grand stave. And often just an interpretation, rather than an accurate description. But the rest is up to the player. Of course it can be listened to - that's how the drummer also gets to know what to play. ...


11

Are you supposed to use it in conjunction with listening to the song to figure out the strumming pattern? Yes. Most people find it very easy to hear what the vocal melody is, and the basic rhythmic pattern of the accompaniment, from listening to a recording of the song. However, it's harder to remember all the lyrics and work out the chords. This kind of ...


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