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0

I suppose you might scratch the back of the neck if using a clamp-on that is too small (i.e. meant for thin neck, used on thick neck). But that might happen anyway if you are not careful. As you say, the curvature of capos is different for different applications. So when using a capo meant for a curved fretboard (e.g. electric) on a flat fretboard (e.g. ...


0

My guitar is Yamaha fg 151,and the fretboard is bending, so i want to adjust from the trustrod, please anyone can tell me which wrench size would i use to adjust it please


3

It's pretty clearly a Gmaj7 chord with fingering (from low E to high e): X X 5 4 3 2 It's the IV chord of the key, coming from a Dmaj7 chord.


1

Difficult to make out exactly with the microphone in the way, but the position of the pinky especially makes it look like a loosely-barred "open-C" pattern starting at the second fret, which would make it a D. But it looks like he is muting with the index finger, and possibly leaving the G string open, more like: The internet says that the song is in D. ...


1

I think it's worth mentioning here that a major reason that guitarists and other stringed instruments use an alternate tuning is to accommodate a singer's voice. Though I believe you are referring specifically to instrumental music given your example, this fact also supports the case that D# tuning (usually called Eb tuning) is not that rare at all, at least ...


2

If you follow b3ko's suggestions and still can't discover what is buzzing, it could be a part that you can not see or touch, such as the truss rod inside the neck. Try adjusting it just a tiny bit with a truss rod wrench to eliminate the buzz. If that doesn't help, you might take the guitar to a luthier, who can shoot a small amount of white glue into the ...


8

Something else may be loose elsewhere on the guitar and that is its resonant frequency. Is it like a rattle? Strike a G and feel around the guitar. If you touch something and the buzz stops you have found the loose part. Try around the head stock, the strap buttons, the knobs, the 1/4 Jack, the little string holders on the head stock, the screws that hold on ...


0

He does look like he is using the 11th fret. In the TAB the lowest line is the low E string. In other words the strings are "upside down" in comparison to how they would be if you are looking at the guitar in someone else's hands. As you look down at your guitar neck while you hold it the strings should appear in the order shown in the TAB. The "first" ...


2

Did you look up fingerstyle slapping as piiperi suggests: I‘found this video that teaches, how to master finger style slapping (10 exercises):


3

If you're are talking about such as a Rickenbacker neck, they actually have both - 2 truss rods, both dual action - the rods are U-shaped & push as well as pull on the rear of the aluminium bar in the headstock. pic: Haze Guitars If the neck is level [ie not twisted], adjust both by the same number of flats, one at a time, left a flat, right a flat [if ...


2

An Epiphone acoustic, MIJ, which I bought second-hand 50 yrs ago, has never needed touching. My Tele - '76 - the same. A Shergold, ('78) which was played on hundreds of gigs for 25 yrs+ again, no problem. So while there is a very slight chance that 'creep' might affect a guitar, so far, it's not any of mine - of which I have many older editions - including ...


1

In theory yes, in practise no. Case in point… My 1964 Strat & 1976 Rikki 4001. I adjusted both neck truss-rods when I got them, simply because I didn't like how they were set before. They haven't needed touching since. The Strat I did in the mid 90's, the Rikki in 1990. So in practise, I'd call 30 years pretty stable.


2

There are a few things he's doing with the rhythm. I'm not sure if there's a name for the whole effect, though. The slaps happen on beats 2 and 4, constituting a backbeat. There's a chord on beat 1 and a staccato chord on the last 16th note of beat one. This is sometimes called an anticipation. The bass thumps are on the last 2 16ths of beat 2, stopping ...


2

Engineer and musician's answer: Another way you can think about it is that when you fret up the neck, you are essentially creating "fatter" strings. Imagine fretting almost all the way up to the bridge; the segment of string would start looking like a barrel. The engineering answer is that the barrel has a different area to length ratio (actually area-...


2

That's the normal way to play a repeated note when the notation doesn't call for sustained notes or legato. Note that on, say, a piano, if you play a chord twice, there will be a silence because when you lift your hand, the dampers will kick in. To prevent that, you can use the sustain pedal. Then that becomes somewhat like the effect of strumming a guitar'...


6

Generally pulsing a chord would most often be used as part of a rhythmic technique to lend a particular element to the rendition as part of the style of playing - or as part of the arrangement for a particular song that lends itself to the technique. The video example you shared is actually part of a fingerstyle technique of creating a bass line and ...


1

The above answer is fine. I use the technique to give a "snappy" rhythm. Not for melancholy of serious songs, great for "Happy Birthday" and other lively music.


0

In jazz, the most apparent solution would be to modulate via II-V-I: A#m7(Bbm7) Cm7 |C#m7b5 F#7 |Bm7 |


2

I play piano myself, and I recently played with a trio with guitar and bass for the first time. My experience, as a piano player, when having a solo, was that the tight, clustered left hand chords (Bill Evans) worked not so well with the guitar comping underneath. The alterations may clash, especially when the guitarist used tight voicings of his chords. ...


2

When modulating by a half step, one trick is to exploit the enharmonic equivalence between the German augmented-sixth chord and the dominant-seventh chord. In A♯ minor, the German augmented-sixth chord is F♯ A♯ C♯ D𝄪; since this chord sounds the same as the V7 in B (F♯ A♯ C♯ E), you can easily resolve to B minor and strengthen the modulation from there. ...


0

Modulation and key change generally speaking uses the V chord of the new key. So you'd have a bar or two of F♯ or F♯7 leading into the new key of Bm. You could also lead into that F♯ with an A♯diminished chord, using it as a pivot note. That gets the job done in one or two bars.


2

Don't play full 6 string chords, but partials (look at the LCJO tutorial on YouTube). Don't play all the time. Listen a lot. Listen some more to the Nat King Cole Trio with Oscar Moore or John Collins.


1

To silence the strings for a rhythmic effect, usually staccato. The tempo is unrelated, but often you'll find this heavily used in fast Funk and Pop rhythms with heavy syncopation.


3

With some rhythm patterns, it's necessary to strum chords that are very short in duration. It spices up the rhythm itself, and the simplest way to achieve it is to 'pulse' - hold down the strings, and momentarily loosen the grip to make that strum sound short. It works best on full barre chords, because all strings can be choked at once, with one slight ...


0

I’ve found this technic out myself as I’ve been an autodidact in Guitar playing. (There were no wikipedia or youtube tutorials SE!) All we had were some basic diagrams like C, G7, D7, E, am ... and we shared our knowlegde at the campfire. So I learnt to play the F chord with help by the thumb. This was quite easy: the movement was similar to make a fist. ...


7

As a guitarist, if I'm playing with a pianist, I usually do a couple of things. If I haven't played with them before, I'll usually lay off a bit in order to get a feel for how the pianist wants to approach the comping. I tend to adapt my paying around my bandmates when I'm comping. If the pianist wants to do some complicated rhythmic stuff, I tend to go ...


3

To answer your question of "why" it is added in the fingering diagrams, it has to do with convention. In jazz, a diminished symbol (°) is often shorthand for diminished 7 (°7) in sheet music even though that is technically imprecise (as explained in the other answers). I would say in this context -- ie not sheet music but something meant to be instructional, ...


2

B, D, F is B diminished. B, D, F, A♭ (or G♯) is B diminished 7th. This 4-note chord has a special property - it's symmetrical. It's a pile of minor 3rds. But add another minor 3rd - G♯ up to B - and we're back where we started! Bdim7 is the same notes as Ddim7 as Fdim7asAb dim7. And it's full of tritones - the augmented 4th/diminished ...


0

vii° is a B<5 triad (B,D,F,) as notated in the staff of your example. What you're asking for is vii°7 B dim7 or B°7 (B,D,F,Ab) As the dim7 chords can be used as enharmonic exchanges it might be also spelled as B,D,F,G# but more logical would be G#,B,D,F.


2

There is a difference between a diminished triad and a full diminished seventh chord. The dim triad is (1, b3, b5) but the full dim chord has a double flatted seventh (1, b3, b5, bb7). Strictly speaking the G# is not correct from the perspective of classical music theory as G is not the seventh of B but they are enharmonic so some texts may equate them. I ...


4

This is a tough call. Where on the finger board is not really helpful. The bigger issue will be two people comping simultaneously and having the rhythms clash. Do you have a Bass in the group? If not you could always play a sort of walking chord melody bass line in the lower register. That would fill up space and keep the steady groove going and act as ...


2

Find out where your guitarist likes to play on the fretboard, then go to a different register on the piano keyboard. What to do will be very different if the guitarist wants to play open-string voicings or spend most of the time somewhere above the 12th fret, an octave higher.


1

Every little thing can affect the way a guitar sounds and plays. If you are an experimenter you might choose to remove the stickers and discern for yourself the effect it has on the sound and playability. Removing the stickers may also affect the vintage collectability of the instrument in the future. In fact any alterations to the instrument may affect ...


3

Wood-to-wood contact is ideal. I seriously doubt the stickers are making a discernible difference in sound, but YMMV. If you do decide to remove them, you may find that the tilt of the neck relative to the body has been altered -- it takes less than a millimeter at the joint to adversely affect the angle and therefore playability. Do this with caution and ...


-1

In addition to skinny peacock's answer I think the actual answer is theft. Every other answer here would force you to someone invent great solos out of thin air. Absurd. Steal them ... exactly as every great musician has. You learn the solos you like, you analyze them a bit, you pick out little phrases and 'melodic patterns' and you create a palette of your ...


-1

me I found some guitar riff on guitar pro software, I made it play in loop, and I improvised guitar solos on it, trying to use key tones or modes. The application chord tracker work well too, it play songs indicate the chord which is playing and you can make a part of the song play in loop and improvise with your guitar. If you don't know how to improvise I ...


0

There are 3 different ways of Guitar-chord notation and reading: staff of 5 lines like almost all other instruments Chord-TAB (as you are showing here) they are used for finger picking and more differentiated accompaniments e.g. bass licks. Chord diagram: mostly used for lyrics and added chords - what you're calling "words" (from the chord-diagrams (...


4

Those 'words' are actually chord names. Most songs will have a chord or two that fit with the bar they're next to. In this case, Fmaj7 tells that the full chord is F major 7th, which cotains the notes F A C and E. The tab shows exactly that - F on the fat E string, and ACE on the top three strings. That couldn't be clearer or more accurate! The 'Am' word ...


1

If we're trying to fit everything into a functional 'cycle of 5ths' system, IV is actually a substitute for ii, V of V. ♭VII 'works' because it has two notes in common with ii. ♭VII7? Well, in a jazz/blues environment, you can add a 7th to just about any chord and it won't sound bad! There are similarities with the 'backdoor progression' ...


1

It takes precision to place the nut at the correct location, however, say a guitar neck maker were to produce in many or mass quantities necks for a certain kind of guitar. That maker would not have to be concerned with the exact placement of the nut. The maker would simply add a fret at that correct location (negligible cost) then install a nut behind it. ...


4

One highly recommended approach is to play things slower... much slower. Cut the tempo in half and try to play it all with just as much expression/emotion. This allows you more time to focus on each note a bit more and forces you to play each note with more intention. Once you really, truly nail it at a slower tempo, move that tempo up in small increments....


3

Ahh the Neil Young classic "Heart of Gold". That is the song that inspired me to learn to play harmonica and guitar at the same time. It's just not the same without the harp solo. Many folk songs are played in what's known as "first position" on the harmonica which is they key the song is in. Most blues are played in 2nd position which a 4th higher ...


1

Without an fx loop in your amp you cannot bypass the preamp and so the main input is the only place you can plug the pedal into. Having said that you can still use the amp models if you want to. If you set your amp to completely clean with a flat Eq, you could use the zoom like it is running into the Fx return. Otherwise you could just use the effects on the ...


3

Sets of harmonicas can be purchased - all 12 keys in a big set! But big sets cost big money! You won't be able to use the 'standard' C, F, G, A harps well with your tuning - unless you capo or play barre chords for your songs, so you'll need the others out of the 'big set'. I'm guessing (have to - sparse info) that songs will be in E♭, A♭ D♭ ...


4

Take lessons. The path to accuracy and speed on any instrument is the same formula. Years of methodical, slow, meticulous practice of basic exercises with a metronome. There are dozens of great books, DVDs, etc out there for developing technique. But they are all teaching the same basic thing. You need to get the movements in your muscle memory and ...


1

I sometimes write remixes of 1990's classic PC game music in GarageBand as a hobby - here's my workflow: Work pattern-by-pattern. Most of the music in question is formatted as tracker modules or MIDIs, which means each section (pattern) should have a similar instrument arrangement. Pick the individual instruments out individually. Start with the main ...


3

It's called transcribing. Basically you play the song back phrase by phrase and try to copy it on your instrument.It takes some time but with patience you can learn the entire piece. You may or may not choose to write down (notate) your findings as you go. In this piece there are a number of voices, you might work through them all. It is excellent practice ...


1

Hm! lovely! that's a mixture of Dire Straits and Hank Marvin :-) I'd go for .. A reverb A mild delay as well Probably a compressor New bright-sounding strings An excellent & very clean playing technique


2

Reverb. That's all that's on it. Actually, after comments, there is a single delay repeat on it too - so quiet I didn't spot it to start with. The rest is just a very simple clean Strat sound, front pickup. It doesn't hurt at all that he plays it well. I was trying to find some earlier refs for a historically similar sound, but basically it's a brighter, ...


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