New answers tagged

2

It's quite possible! The mic, wired or wireless, will work with most amps, as mics (not powered ones though) should. Guitar amps are balanced, tonally, to give the best sounds for guitar, which has a unique pitch range, so guitar amps cater for this. Vocals won't sound as good as they should, but that won't stop it working. And being wireless - with a good ...


0

It is not desirable to use a wireless mic on-stage for a cabinet (it'd be a different story if it was handled, like a singer's mic). Unless everything is wireless, the stage will be full of cables running every which way, including power for amps, pedalboards, DI-outs to the main board, etc. The benefit of reducing clutter by one wire will not balance out ...


0

Only in a crazy situation would I do that... If the out put of the pre amp.( Where the mic signal connects) is quarter you can. But a mic through a guitar amp is by nature no good. A mic that uses quarter rather than xlr 3 prong is usually low quality and unless in the expensive side wirless mic are notoriously unreliable. So I'm sorry to say unless just for ...


1

I'm going to agree with Jarek.D in the comments and assume that's it's fret buzz.


0

In TAB notation, whenever there are legato sections of tied notes, you should pick / strum the first note of the set and then use hammer-ons and/or pull-offs to sound the other notes. In your first example, if you follow the notation exactly, you should fret the note on the eighth fret on the low E string (using your middle finger), pick it, then hammer-on ...


0

First part, yes play 8th fret, hammer-on 10th, pull off to 8 again (keep a finger on fret 8 ready for the pull off). The G/F♯ semiquavers are played alternating, as written, on the bottom string. The other numbers are strange though - frets 30 and 31. Maybe it's harmonics on the top 4 strings, but the actual music notes are off screen high on ledger ...


2

To elaborate and visualize the previous answers a bit further, here's a legend: Amp/head: the device that amplifies the electrical signal. This is an electrical processor that does not produce audible sound. Cabinet: the actual speaker that speaks out the processed signal and makes it audible. The above two come in two main flavors: Stack: The amp and ...


0

This happened to me but only on the G string of my middle pickup. I took the pickguard off and there was a ground screw with a wire not connected to anything in the cavity right below the pickup. The screw was evidently touching the pickup magnet and making it so it wouldn't sound when plucked.


0

Additionally: An old luthier told me that the thinner-cored strings 'bend' as they vibrate nearly at the point of contact with the saddle, whereas thicker cored strings start their bend a little further away from the saddle, hence the need for a little more length.


4

Everything Tim said in his excellent answer is exactly right. But I would like to expand on what he said for those who may encounter this question in the future and want a more detailed explanation. Almost all guitars provide some type of "compensation" at the saddle (part of the bridge) as a means of adjusting the intonation so the strings stay ...


3

CAGED is a cute mnemonic. I think mneumonics too often substitute for learning a fundamental. CAGED is a bad idea instead of just learning two simple chord voicing concepts: closed voicing like an open C chord, and open voicing like an open E chord. (Unfortunately, "open" is a bit confusing in the previous sentence, it is used both to mean "open strings ...


1

I the CAGED system as a way to visualize a schale/chord pattern all over the fretboard. Unlike the piano, which arranges all the notes from lower to higher, and clearly indicating which ones are "natural" and which one "accidentals" (ie: sharp/flats), the guitar has a certain geometry that seems to obscure this a bit. All you get are 6 strings, with 19 to ...


4

If the saddles are staggered, it's due to intonation. One may think that each of the six strings ought to be exactly the same length, but from a physics point of view that isn't so. Due to each string being a different density, and gauge, each one needs its own speaking length, which when adjusted accurately will make each fretted note sound better in tune. ...


2

There is a wide spectrum of rasgueados in flamenco. Perhaps the most basic aspects to consider are 1) wether the finger pattern matches the rhythmic pattern of the music, 2) the difference in sound between various strokes, 3) the final placement of your fingers at the end of the rasgueado and 4) personal idiosyncracies. Note: please note that in all the ...


1

The best option is likely to re-learn the song either in C as-sounds without capo, or with capo 3. Capo 3 would allow you to play it with quite similar voicing and fingering to how you learned it in D, because it'll be mostly just one string down. The match is even closer if you tune the G string one half step down, so that the open strings are then G-C-F-A-...


4

Short answer is 10th fret. Capo on the 10th fret makes everything rather tight and you may find that uncomfortable. Some other options are detailed below. If you insist on using the same chord shapes as in the key of D while playing in the key of C - you have two choices. 1) Put a capo on the 10th fret or 2) Tune your guitar a whole step flat and play ...


0

The only way that's possible is to capo it on fret 10. But then it'll be almost impossible to get your fingers into the frets, and it'll sound rather strange. Two other more sensible possibilities. Learn the chords from a different key, and capo accordingly. Tune the guitar down a whole tone and play what you know. That will work fine, but may mess up any ...


0

In principle but it would be on the 10th fret and hence would not leave you much space in which to play.


-1

Added a Cable with Higher Amps worked fine afterwards


0

I put my experience on the matter on this lil print. 1.Guitar can be humbucker and even dull one.Not fully dull but half dull like Angus Young style 7500k pickup which I have in my SG. That produces very solid distortion when put through signal chain. 2.Pre Equing is most important practical tool and the point where you need to invest thought. But you can ...


2

I can see 2 quite different ways: A. just by playing around with your fingers on the frets with the left hand (hammer on) you’ll find out and develop new patterns and riffs that you can use for improvisation. Of course you can learn also the riffs from existing songs and exercise and copy other guitarists. B. The other approach is by singing the song ...


5

What are you doing for an hour? How long have you been playing? You have to know enough music and technique to have something to say. One philosophy is that impov is "variation on a theme". So don't just noodle around but learn a song thoroughly, even learn someone else's solo on the song (original if it's a guitar song) then start editing, adding some of ...


1

the tab shows a muted string, the x, and another note played at the same time on the next string down. This can be done in several ways but here it looks like he is muting the note with his thumb on his fretting hand. One would assume he’d then strike both strings with his picking hand but I don’t see that happening. Could be what we hear, what we see, and ...


3

It's called a string harmonic https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/String_harmonic String harmonics are "high pitched tones, like a whistle's, are produced when the musician lightly touches certain points on a string." To play the octave harmonic, the player lightly touches the string at exactly halfway between the ends of the string's vibrating length, ...


0

I've found the answer by myself. It's not very visible on the photo I've posted in the question, but there's two icons by the sides of the display. One is a fork icon and the other looks like an empty set icon. These are both physical buttons. They are kinda mushy and I first thought I was breaking the screen by pressing on them, but they are. Not sure what ...


0

It is a bit unclear to me what your precise question is so I will give it my best shot. I understand you're concerned about the fingering of the Gmaj7. Fingering it as 2-4-3-1 (using your notation) is the most comfortable way to play a maj7 chord with the root on the 6th string (in this case, Gmaj7). Playing it as 2-3-4-1 would be uncomfortable for your ...


0

You can make all possible 7th chords that are consistent with harmonizing the diatonic scale by taking 4 consecutive 3rds of the major scale. The notes of the major scale are referenced by their degree (an index 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 for Do, Re, Mi, Fa, Sol, La, Ti, Do). The tricky thing is that when we build chords we always use the major scale degrees ...


3

What type of acoustic guitar, steel string or classical? This is a valid technique and in theory should not cause damage. There are limits to everything of course. Some guitars do NOT have the nut glued down so extreme bending can make the nut pop off. I did this to an electric guitar of mine decades ago and it really freaked me out, but no damage. I ...


4

Bending strings is a technique that has been use for years and is pretty standard from a playing perspective. Will it put a bit of extra strain on the frets and the strings...yes. But the alternative is to put the guitar in its case, stick it in the closet, never touch it and have it remain in pristine condition. It will last a lot longer but your life will ...


0

Well, basically it's correct that the C Major chord is made up of the tones C, E and G. On a usual guitar, when you strum the "normal" C chord (not the barré one) and omit the low E string, the following tones sound: C E G C E. So that's five distinct tones ringing, but actually only 3 really different ones, yet in different octaves. Your're right, the C7 ...


8

...Are 7th chords made up from 4 notes? The simple answer is yes. C E G Bb is a dominant seventh chord and it has 4 tones. In practice it is common to not play all chord tones - you can call those implied or incomplete chords - and sometimes the root of a chord is not actually play - implied or rootless chords. A little more sophisticated answer is that ...


3

"I saw in some website, that it's made up from "B♭". Let's get that out of the way for a start! Yes, a B♭ does come into it, but that statement, as it stands, is nonsense. Carry on... Yes, a major chord has three notes. If we consider the lowest note to be the root of a major scale (yes, if you want to understand theory you'll need to know ...


2

7th chords are made of 4 notes, which is a sort of an extension of a typical triad making a chord. min7, M7, maj7, or 7 (a dominant chord which a C7 is an example of) are constructed with 4 notes.


8

A dominate 7th chord (often written as x7 where x is the root) will contain the Root (1st degree), 3rd, 5th, and flat 7th. Therefor a C7 will be C, E, G and Bb. At times a player can choose to leave out a note, usually the 5th or the root but in those case it is common that the other players will be playing them or that they are implied. The 3rd and 7th ...


4

The chord you are describing is referred to as a dominant seventh, which flattens the seventh note of the scale. By doing this the chord becomes very useful for resolving back to the tonic of the scale because of the tension caused by the flatted seventh scale degree when it is combined with the other harmonies in the chord. Compare that to the major seventh ...


13

Yes, seventh chords are made up using 4 notes. 1,3,5 and 7. That's why they are named 'seventh' chords. But that's going to be too simple! There are quite a few different 7th chords, and the one you're asking about is the dominant seventh.It's actually a chord that belongs to key F, rather than key C. The B♭ note that's added to the basic triad doesn't ...


0

This is a typical 2/4 time rhythm: the 8/16 are grouped 212111 but you can hear as well the 332 rhythm. If you can play it you actually don't need to count it. But you want analyze it ... so first do this exercise: counting the 8th notes 1 _ 2 _ 3 _ 4 _ => Da _ Da _ Da _ Da _ etc. the 8th notes you count: one two three four (or singing Da) the 16th ...


3

When trying to count in music, it's worth slowing it all down. On guitar, life's a bit easier, particularly with rhythms. Here, you are strumming basically down, up, then down again, then up again, etc. Let's face it, in order to do the next downstrum, it needs the hand to come up again! A lot of rhythms start with a downstrum on beat 1. You do it here. ...


2

It's a fairly brisk 4/4, and the rhythm is Q-EQ-EEE 1+2+3+4+ (Q for quarter notes, E for eight notes). So I'd count One-TwoAnd-andFourAnd. I don't hear any swing in the way you play it.


0

Presumably the options are intended for wind instruments where the written pitch of the note is different from the sounding pitch. That does not apply to guitar, so you want the "C" option.


1

Attach the clip to the head of the guitar, play each string and the tuner will tell what note it's sounding. Fat to thin, aim for E A D G B and E, but be careful you're in the right octave for each string. The 'C' option may make the difference, as it's not transpositional, so switch to that over the others.


0

I agree The 12 string Must be tuned 2 notes lower, i have proved the strain on my 12 strings when toned to concert E. The sound is also improved as is the action. using heavy strings and tuning down also does not help the guitar as the tension is too high resulting in eventual neck bend and high action as well as bridge lift. on gibson B 45 s with tailpiece ...


0

The saddle isn't too low. You want enough down angle from the saddle to the bridge (pin slots) to keep the strings from rattling across the saddle, and from the picture it looks like you have enough angle. As long as there is no string rattle you are fine. EDIT: Since the question was clarified as to why the concern for the low saddle, I stand by my ...


0

When I measure action on a set-up, I measure from the bottom of the string to the top of the fret at the twelfth fret and the first fret. I adjust string height at the nut and at the bridge to accomplish the measurement I desire at the first and twelfth fret. That measurement might vary depending on my picking style, strumming style, and sometimes the kind ...


1

The list of potential problems that may be causing your amplifier, cable, and guitar to not sound is quite long. It may be something as simple as dirt or corrosion in a connector, a defective guitar pickup, a defective solder connection on a circuit board, a guitar cable plug that is not securely plugged all the way in, and on and on. The usual procedure for ...


1

This happens with two different guitars, so it (probably) isn't the guitar. Try a different lead, try a different amplifier. Do whichever is more convenient first! Probably the different lead. Unless your guitar-playing friend lives next door?


1

I don't really know exactly what you want the final output to look like. But here are some suggestions. \score { \new Staff { % 1. different voices (with rests) << { r8 g' c'' e'' r a' d'' fis'' } \\ { c'2 d' } >> | % 2. merging the heads in different voices (as already suggested) \mergeDifferentlyHeadedOn ...


3

There is an option to do exactly what you want. For some reason the complete example seems to be temperamental and isn't displaying properly, but the Lilypond keyword is \mergeDifferentlyHeadedOn. Look it up in the documentation. { \relative c' { << { \mergeDifferentlyHeadedOn c8 g' c e d, a' d fis } \\ { c,2 d } >> } }


5

It looks like you are trying to play an open G maj chord but that's hard to tell from the pic. In general a collapsed finger joint is not proper. With practice and correct posture that should not happen. Of course there are exceptions to every rule and people have different body sizes and shapes. Sometimes deviations make certain fingering difficult. ...


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