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Try just coming up with a melody that fits the song, play over some of your favourite jazz tracks and have fun with them. Solos come from feeling, you use the strongest notes to fit a song to keep it melodic and add rhythm, try to emphasize the stronger notes at any time and try keep it rhythmic so that they stand out in a song while adding some fancy ...


1

Generally in jazz chord names the base 7-chord is taken to be the dominant 7-chord. So when you read E7 the 7-th does not depend on the scale like it would with standard figured bass notation, but it always stands for an E dominant 7 chord. So jazz chord names are agnostic to the key you are in. Also it is a normal convention to omit the 7 from the chord ...


3

Leaving aside the "add9" for this explanation, the term "E7" refers to the dominant E, which has a flat 7th (which is a D natural). It is usually found in the scale of A major as the V chord. Just because you have a E major chord, it doesn't meant that you are in the E major scale. If you wanted to mark a major 7th (which is D#), you ...


3

First point is that the guitar is actually producing sounds one octave lower than the dots on the G (treble) clef show. Using that clef, and standard tuning, there is only the need for three ledger lines ever to be used at the low end. The majority of 'trebly - type' instruments will use the treble clef, so it's the better known one for most potential ...


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There's a Hal Leonard book titled An Introduction to Jazz Guitar Soloing I wrote many years ago. It's still in print but I'm out of the loop with it these days. I wrote it and used it when I taught at GIT in Hollywood for many years. I'm not self-promoting this because I don't get any money for it anymore but it may answer a lot of your questions. It sold a ...


3

Freddie Green had fairly unique style. He would fret complete chord voicings but mute most of the strings and only have one string ringing (mostly the D string). With the right hand he would mostly play straight quarters. This makes his contribution a mixture of rhythm instrument keeping the beat while at the same time playing single line. I'm guessing that ...


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Probably the already given answers are also right, in the sense that the mentioned factor physically modify the harmonic response of the string. But I think soaking in ethanol for 24 hours will not make the string new, because of a physical phenomenon called "fatigue", that I guess plays the main role here. As you know every material have his own ...


10

tl,dr: Finger gunk. It's the same reason why strings become dull over time. When playing. the oil, sweat and salt from your fingers interacts with the string and results in corrosion and accumulation. This is more pronounced where you fret the most and this results in an uneven mass distribution and the center of gravity moves slightly away from the 12th ...


11

I've been curious about this too. I imagine this is the same phenomenon that violinists refer to as a string "going false." The effect is the location of pitches becomes inconsistent along the length of the string, especially noticeable on a fretless instrument; i.e. if you tried to play, on two strings, a pitch a perfect fourth higher than the ...


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If you feel pain while playing you should absolutely not continue but try to change what causes the pain. Else you might cause permanent damage to your hand. Pain in muscles is usually fine, as these will grow stronger, but you should be very careful about pain in joints and tendons, as the first will not grow stronger in any way and latter will only do so ...


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It's probably not so much where your thumb goes - and let's face it, that varies from chord to chord, shape to shape, and indeed person to person. It's more likely you're squeezing the neck too tightly. There really is no need on most shapes, if any at all. In fact, you should be able to play clean barre chords with the thumb off the back of the neck. Not ...


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If you feel pain playing chords I would consider that is extremely recommended to correct your position, before things get worse. I've experienced this same problems when playing chords progession during long time, or just even when playing a whole song that uses chord progressions, and, after some testing changing positions and modifying the way I handle ...


1

I agree that this is more 10/8 than 5/4: ONE two three ONE two three one-two one-two ONE two three ONE two three one-two one-two and I would say the same of Dave Brubeck's "Take Five." To me a true 5/4 would be one two ONE two three one two ONE two three or one two three ONE two one two three ONE two both of which feel very jaggedy compared to 10/8....


4

For gory details, see this physicsSE answer. Among other things mentioned there: --- it's the sound board in any plucked, bowed, or percussion instrument (piano is percussion) which amplifies the vibrations as well as providing better impedance matching. --- The sound hole makes the box a Helmholtz resonator, which slightly modifies the spectral resonance ...


6

A guitar does not need a sound-hole, actually omitting the soundhole eliminates much of the feedback problems that people who play acoustics in loud environments have been plagued with since the birth of rock. Now, this guitar has a sound-hole at the top, but that is a feature so you can hear yourself play. I'm sure that could have been omitted as well. ...


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I'm strongly in the "get a specific guitar for that" camp, too. A thing with with fretless guitar is that you don't need to get over the frets, so you go with a very low action; lower than you could ever expect with frets. And because you don't need to bend — you can just slide as high as you want — you can play heavy strings without "working ...


1

On that amp, you can also connect the mono output of the effects board to the “mp3” or aux input of the amp. This will bypass the amp’s preamp section and go straight to the power amp and speaker. That will allow the effects board to do all the amp and speaker modelling with minimal colouration from the guitar amp.


24

The sound holes on stringed instruments are not there so that the sound can be heard. They are there to tune the resonances of the wooden bodies that amplify the sounds. It is true that there are certain frequencies that are loudest right near the sound holes, but plugging those sound holes or building those instruments without any holes would not make them ...


6

Yes! You could always have a custom guitar built, or modify an existing guitar: Have the fretboard replaced and have the frets set to match the spacing on a Setar. But then the guitar would not be usable as a standard guitar. In order to allow for different intonations, some innovators (like Tolgahan Çoğulu in the video below) have devised ways to make ...


3

Of course it is possible to add (or remove) frets from a fingerboard. It will require some skill in modifying guitars on your part or you can contract someone to do it for you. You would need to have a very clear idea of the exact pitches you want in order to calculate where the frets need to be. Another issue is whether you can keep the pre-existing frets ...


6

In naming keys, "major" is often omitted, so "in A" normally means "in A major." I could imagine someone saying "in A" to mean "A minor" in informal usage, but only if the context makes it clear that the key is A minor rather than A major. The key (apologies) to understanding E major and E minor as the same ...


3

For starters, D♭ minor does not have the same notes as E major - C♯ minor does. E major and C♯minor both have 4 sharps - D♭ minor has only flats. On to the question. When improvising in E major - (not Em), then notes from both E pent. major and E pent. minor are often used - good players will incorporate both sets of notes (and any of the other notes which ...


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Pickup placement has a massive effect on tone. Moving a bridge or neck pickup just a few millimeters causes an audible difference. Mass of the body also has an effect. Both are at play here. The former will only effect the plugged in tone, but differences in physical construction (body mass, woods, construction etc.) will also be audible when played ...


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One way is to target the root note for the chord currently playing and then apply the appropriate scale based on the flavour of that chord. For example, playing a D Mixolydian over a D7 chord works well, because the scale contains a flattened 7th interval.


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First, let’s talk about playing minor chords in major open tunings. For example let's take Open-D D–A–D–F♯–A–D. How would you play a minor chord on that? Fret the second fret on both A strings and it becomes a B minor chord. Use a barre and two fingers as appropriate to play any other minor chord. And that’s just the first way to play minor shapes I found ...


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I think the main reason is simply selection bias. Open-tuned guitars are most often used in blues and genres derived from it, and blues traditionally uses almostly exclusively major chords (usually with added sevenths). No minor chords – you do find the minor-chord notes, but in the melody, as blue notes, and those can very well be played on a major-open-...


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First you need to find two necks which both are a snug fit to that body. And also both have approximately the same angle into/onto that body. After swapping necks, a set-up would be needed, which may well entail trussrod adjustment and fettling at the bridge. Obviously strings would need to be changed each time, and the holes which the screws that hold the ...


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I'd give up on the idea before you even start. Sure, you can change necks, assuming both are compatible, but unless both fit perfectly, with almost zero movement tolerance, you'd have to line the whole thing up again. They'd each need a different action & each would have been resting without tension while the other neck was on, meaning you'd need to ...


-8

The minor chords and scales are a kind of circumstantial sound. They sound "sad" because they do not really belong in nature-- there's something off about them. The harmonic series are the notes which a string naturally vibrates on, and are equal divisions of the entire string. For E: E, E, B, E, G#, B, D (detuned). There's no G to be found-- the ...


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Thanks for the all the awesome response's. Mine is one of a newbie, and I'm not a music professional at all I would say I recommend An Acoustic Guitar with the ability to sound like a Electric when its accessible and affordable What I have built was more out of neglect to my passion with some technical "No-how" and bare-minimum Sacagawea's. You ...


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