66

Your experience is quite typical. Playing two hands at the same time is completely different than playing both separately. But the point of learning parts separately is NOT about making it easier to play both hands together. It's about learning all the "other" stuff (like correct hand position, articulation etc.) without having the distraction of the second ...


34

There are a few reasons that I found these technical drills helpful as a piano player: They help practice playing the hands together clearly and cleanly. Young piano players often play both hands "together," but the articulations between the hands are not actually in sync. As such, the result is one of constant flam and grace-note relationships between the ...


33

As a piano teacher for more than 50 years I can assure you that you are not alone! Many students have the same experience, though quite a few do not. Of the hundreds I have taught I would say it breaks about 60-40 toward having the problem. As Brad said in his comment to the original question (a comment which has now strangely disappeared), the secret is ...


25

When learning a piece on piano, our bodies -- especially our fingers, hands, and arms -- learn the "feel" of the piece. This is called "muscle memory". It sounds like your muscle memory relies on both hands being played together. So, when you tried to play hands separately, that disrupted your memory, and the piece did not "feel"...


24

It depends on the individual, but I'm going to talk about my own experience. Two things to note: It's not really true that each hand is doing something different. Both hands are working together to create a piece of music. Although at first glance it's "special" to have one hand playing one aspect of a piece while the other hand plays a different aspect -- ...


12

Yes, playing both hands together is quite difficult for beginners, even if you feel like you have mastered each hand separately. You will likely hit another big bump when you move on from playing similar things in both hands (like two octaves of a scale) to playing two different things (like a bass line and a melody). There is yet another big bump when you ...


10

Yes, this is a common problem for anyone who's ever trying to do more than one thing at a time (which for musicians, is quite often). You have to be nice to your brain. Take it slow, painfully, agonizingly slow In fact, don't even play in time. I suggest breaking down the physical motions into their most basic components, and explain what needs to happen ...


10

I am not an expert in anatomy, but I believe this is because the picky and ring finger are connected to each other by the superficial ulnar nerve, whereas the remaining fingers are connected by branches of the deep ulnar nerve. The good news is, despite the fact that your pinky and ring finger seem less independent, this is not permanent. It's normal for ...


8

It's true that not a lot of music has parallel scales for extended runs. But a lot of methods involve playing things that never show up in real music, so that's entirely normal. The point of these exercises isn't to practice something that you will use directly in real music, but to develop a skill more generally. On the other, ahem, hand, if the more ...


8

Your teacher isn't likely to have broken it down to separate hands just to polish the performance. I guess you weren't playing it THAT 'OK' hands together! Sounds like you were getting through it, but with some elements missing. Perhaps you needed to go back to actually READING the music. I know the feeling!


7

Different strategies work for different pieces. Learning to play a Bach fugue would of course be quite different from learning a piece where the left hand is just a bunch of chords. People's brains work differently. I have two kids, both of whom started learning piano at a young age, through the same method. One of them has progressed marvellously. The ...


7

What make's Reich's piece difficult, is how he specifies the phasing. For example, there are portions of the score where you need to be exactly 1/16th note out of phase with yourself. Self-phasing is something I have practiced for quite some time, and indeed, it does take a while to learn. However, such practice / skill allows you great freedom through ...


7

I've played the piano for over 40 years. Something to remember is that it's music, not a set of sequentially formatted computer instructions. ;) So, there are several possible ways that any one brain might approach playing a two-handed piece, and for any two brains, there might be at least one or two more. Let's say, as an example, I have a piece with an "...


7

I’ve recently begun to think that the direction to “play together, then play hands separately” can more often be odd and mistaken than helpful. To be sure, it can be helpful, but without proper context, it’s just… confusing. After all, isn’t most piano music written to assume that the musician will be using both hands? So, while I would not discount your ...


5

As a mature (elderly?) learner, I faced a similar difficulty about a year ago, and found these ideas helped: With the "quiet" hand, keep the fingers as close to the keys as possible at all times (if possible, make sure that they never actually lose contact with the keys) and lift the fingers of the other hand off the keys before playing the note (loudly). ...


4

You might try "ghosting" the note by playing the extra note but muting it with your left hand. When you can do that comfortably, then try just thinking about ghosting the note. I've used this workaround a number of times when learning syncopation.


4

As an encouragement, you might want to think about the different movements involved in driving a car. (Especially if you have driven a stick shift before.) You had to practice before you could get all the movements down correctly. Once you did, you did them without thinking about them. So it is with the piano. Visualize what needs to be done and do it. ...


4

I think some people have the wrong view about piano, and instruments that are similar, when the issue of "hand independence" is discussed. Cognitive science these days seems to indicate that humans never truly "multitask" in their conscious actions; they simply switch between individual tasks very quickly. While I can imagine a human with an unusual ...


4

It's just like riding a bike. At first, it seems very difficult but once you get the hang of it you don't even need to think about it. It's the same way for learning to play the piano hands together. As pieces get more difficult, it can be tricky to get your hands to work together properly, but you won't ever have to relearn playing hands together again.


4

If anyone here can elaborate that would be excellent, since I think it would be rather pointless to do this as it's easy to reach the F3 and G4 if you are not playing them together. It is octaves. You can not easily reach those octaves with the right hand. Doing it the way he does with cross-handed technique is just a simple way that makes sense. You could ...


3

When starting to work on any technique like this, I've found it's good to isolate it down to something so incredibly simple that you are focusing only on the technique and its clarity and not at all on the happenings of a piece. You can use a very simple five finger exercises you already know very well (ex. Hanon 1), but to start, I would recommend just ...


3

Lines and phrasing. Nothing more. Freddie approached this song as a singer also playing the piano, not a piano player playing both the melody and piano part. Think orchestrally or as if you are singing. The RH plays the melody notes of A Bb Bb and, how the music is written, the final Bb is a whole note. Now sure, you can use the sustain pedal and ...


3

The Bach Minuet in A Minor comes from the Anna Magdalena Notebook, which contains many pieces of a similar level. Many, if not all, of those pieces are available at IMSLP. You could also try the collection, "Introduction to Classics to Moderns", edited by Denes Agay. It contains pieces from the pre-Baroque through the mid-twentieth century, all of ...


3

I'd recommend that you include your weak foot in the regular exercises from the beginning. Don't neglect it for 20 years and only then realize how important it can be. Even though you may never actually play double-bass, I'd recommend to practice double bass exercises for coordination. The weak foot is considered "weak" for a reason. I found that I ...


3

First thought: you have been at this only one year. That isn't a long time. Especially if your practice hasn't been effectively focused on rhythm and hand/finger independence, it won't just come spontaneously. Second thought: think about the difference between composite rhythm and true hand independence. Composite rhythm is the rhythm produced by the two ...


2

I think it depends on how you learn a piece. Sometimes you might learn a piece by learning all the particular movements related to each other. Playing these and these notes on these beats and so on. However, most of the time, pianists will learn one hand, then the other. Ultimately they will try to learn one well enough, so playing that part almost ...


2

A John petrucci training exercise I used a while back helps a lot with finger dexterity You start off with a basic chord of : 1 2 3 4 X X Then move your index up a fret and switch positions with the middle finger like so: 2 1 3 4 X X Then you move up the whole 4 strings you are fretting with the index When you're done you should have: 4 1 2 3 X X Then you ...


2

The problem you mention is a one I face constantly with my students. I teach piano, so most probably I will be able to help you. Until I see your fingering and how much coordination their is, I can't give you a concrete solution, because those are based on individual fingering and hand- brain coordination. I would suggest you try learning Beethoven's ...


2

I've only been playing piano for 5 years and started in my mid 40s, and still have a long way to go before I'm ready to play publicly due to me not being overly coordinated or agile, but like some others have already said, it helps to learn each hand's part individually to the point where you more or less have memorized it and gradually have sped them up to ...


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