5

Ahh the Neil Young classic "Heart of Gold". That is the song that inspired me to learn to play harmonica and guitar at the same time. It's just not the same without the harp solo. Many folk songs are played in what's known as "first position" on the harmonica which is they key the song is in. Most blues are played in 2nd position which a 4th higher ...


5

Playing blues on a harp, drawing is the way to go. Blowing on, say, a C harp will give you the notes of that chord - C. So the blues notes, mainly, give the chord a fourth away - G. So, for a song in G, you'd need a C harp. To calculate what you need, know the guitar key, and count backwards 5, or more simply, forwards 4. As in, song's in A, use D. Song's ...


4

Generally, for blues, if guitar plays in C you would use an F harp. This is to get the Bb ("blue 7th"), otherwise known as Mixolydian mode. In general, you want the harp whose key is a perfect 4th above the key of the blues. So: For a E blues, an A harp For a D blues, a G harp and so on.


3

Maybe nothing to do with common key signatures. B♭, E♭, A♭, D♭ going on to G♭ with 6 flats. Because F♯ also has 6 sharps. However - that very note F♯ features a heck of a lot more in music than its enharmonic equivalent of G♭. It's a better known name! The best place to ask this is with the manufacurers - who will ...


3

Sets of harmonicas can be purchased - all 12 keys in a big set! But big sets cost big money! You won't be able to use the 'standard' C, F, G, A harps well with your tuning - unless you capo or play barre chords for your songs, so you'll need the others out of the 'big set'. I'm guessing (have to - sparse info) that songs will be in E♭, A♭ D♭ ...


3

For a guide to the 4 hole harmonica, I'd recommend you check out The Ultimate Miniature Harmonica Tunebook by Pat Missin. I haven't read it, but the author is very respected in the harmonica world. To answer your question: Yes! You can play all the 13 chromatic notes from your low C to your high C. (This might even be possible without overblows!) If you ...


3

Don’t take apart a marine band. They're put together with nails, not screws. After playing take a dry soft cloth and carefully dry it then let it air dry. Don’t close it up in the box. Mine only gets closed in the box if I’m transporting it to a gig. I use the box at home to store it in always opened as sort of a cradle plus it’s easier to find. Personally I ...


2

If it is saliva, you need to find ways of reducing that - not only does it contribute to the popping noise, it also won’t be doing the reeds of your harmonica any good. How you do that will vary person to person, but watch what you eat & drink before playing. It may also be that you’re pressing too hard on the harmonica; you need to seal the lips to ...


2

Probably over 99% of all 10 hole diatonic harmonicas are tuned to a standard tuning, but within the remaining 1% there's a world of variation, and it doesn't even stop at minor and minor! If it was only natural minor, surely a standard diatonic harp would suffice? My short answer to this question would be NO, but let me elaborate. There are several ...


1

I've had issues like these too, the problem is u really need to use slide oil. That's the only way to solve this problem. Most harmonica comes with slide oil inside it, after using it for some time (depends on the quality of slide oil), the slide oil will run out and you'll have to apply slide oil again. That's what slide oil is for.


1

It might, but probably not. I tried just now to hold an overblow while tilting the harmonica up and down; I got it from lying flat against my shin with my upper lip stretched over it (I felt like a tapir) to touching my nose (the latter an acrobatic feat which took me several minutes to nail). I used a Seydel Session Steal in A, and it worked for the hole 2 ...


1

Since there are different notes involved in minor keys, which would be used? While there are different kinds of harmonicas, "major" and "minor" are modes of the same diatonic scale; same notes. Most harp players use the Mixolydian mode (aka dominant). Here are the notes of a diatonic harp in G Major, which would be used to play blues in D Major: Since the ...


1

The harmonica keys should correspond to the key of the music, regardless of the genre in which you are playing... The "C", "A", "D", "F", and "G" keys are a good place to start for beginners. Here is a little chart: This article gives a beginner's look at the harmonica positions, if you haven't already reached that in your lessons... A summarized ...


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