Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
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Playing blues on a harp, drawing is the way to go. Blowing on, say, a C harp will give you the notes of that chord - C. So the blues notes, mainly, give the chord a fourth away - G. So, for a song in G, you'd need a C harp. To calculate what you need, know the guitar key, and count backwards 5, or more simply, forwards 4. As in, song's in A, use D. Song's ...


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Generally, for blues, if guitar plays in C you would use an F harp. This is to get the Bb ("blue 7th"), otherwise known as Mixolydian mode. In general, you want the harp whose key is a perfect 4th above the key of the blues. So: For a E blues, an A harp For a D blues, a G harp and so on.


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If it's for a bluesy sound, the harp is usually a fourth above the played key. So, he plays a song in G, the harp needed will be a C harp. However, since he tunes down a semitone, the harp needs to go the same way. It needs to be in B. When he uses the open G tuned guitar, the far more common C harp is the choice. If it's a German made harmonica, you'll be ...


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Diatonic harmonicas are capable of playing in multiple keys. This is done a few of different ways. The most common type of blues playing is called "cross harp," which involves using a harmonica in one key to play in a different key (usually a major fifth away). For example, it is common to use a C harmonica when playing blues in the key of G. You can also ...


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It looks like the Unsere Lieblinge 32 is tuned in the same tuning as the tremolo tuning in the Weiner system: Hohner harmonica tuning chart So you want to search for "Tremolo Harmonica Tabs". Choose simple songs you already know the melody of and add that tune name to your search terms to get started. The Hohner tuning has an F# listed in their notes for ...


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Ahh the Neil Young classic "Heart of Gold". That is the song that inspired me to learn to play harmonica and guitar at the same time. It's just not the same without the harp solo. Many folk songs are played in what's known as "first position" on the harmonica which is they key the song is in. Most blues are played in 2nd position which a 4th higher ...


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Sets of harmonicas can be purchased - all 12 keys in a big set! But big sets cost big money! You won't be able to use the 'standard' C, F, G, A harps well with your tuning - unless you capo or play barre chords for your songs, so you'll need the others out of the 'big set'. I'm guessing (have to - sparse info) that songs will be in E♭, A♭ D♭ ...


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Maybe nothing to do with common key signatures. B♭, E♭, A♭, D♭ going on to G♭ with 6 flats. Because F♯ also has 6 sharps. However - that very note F♯ features a heck of a lot more in music than its enharmonic equivalent of G♭. It's a better known name! The best place to ask this is with the manufacurers - who will ...


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If it is saliva, you need to find ways of reducing that - not only does it contribute to the popping noise, it also won’t be doing the reeds of your harmonica any good. How you do that will vary person to person, but watch what you eat & drink before playing. It may also be that you’re pressing too hard on the harmonica; you need to seal the lips to ...


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You live in a van.. that's going to seriously limit your acoustic environment. I'd seriously consider just putting down a guide if you need one, then doing guitar/vox/anything else as single overdubs. It's practise if nothing else & your separation is guaranteed. You are not going to get separation in such a small space, whatever mics you invest in, ...


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Typically they are brass but other metals such as aluminum and steel have been used. That's great if you can reverse engineer it with a good pair of calipers. Inside the instrument they are attached to the reed plate with screws. Make sure to use a similar material to the surrounding reeds, tune the reed, and gap it to the slot properly. Here's a site with ...


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If you're talking about the 10-hole 'blues harp', the answer's 'yes and no'! You get the notes of one major scale. Obviously you can play diatonic tunes in that key. But we're in blues country. Use an F harp for a blues in C, that Bb will come in very useful! Or use a C harp for a blues in D, now you've got the flat 3rd and flat 7th. And notes can ...


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I was also baffled about how to take off the harmonica cover plates, having wrongly thought they were held on by small screws and invested in a Hohner repair kit. However, I found you could use a small flat-bladed screw driver (the one that came with the Hohner kit was OK) to gently ease off each cover plate in turn by levering them slowly away from the ...


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