22

This happens on all stringed instruments. There are two reasons for that. As you already noticed yourself, pressing down the string does require bending it a little, i.e. stretching, which increases the tension. At least with steel strings, this is enough to audibly sharpen the pitch. Though an idealised model of the string is as a perfectly flexible, ...


16

There are two different questions that could be read here, which it is not obvious (yet extremely significant) that they are different. One question is "what is the name of the scale consisting of the notes given by the first thirteen harmonics of C", and the other is "what is the name of the scale consisting of the notes C - D - E - F# - G - ...


16

Your first sentence holds the key - it is actually not correct. Interestingly, the reason it sounds so different is because the opposite is true - touching at any of the node points removes harmonics. This image from Wikipedia's String Harmonic page shows this very well. Row 1 shows an open string vibrating - the diagram highlights the fundamental, but the ...


13

I'm not a harp player, but it appears that this is done with the harp equivalent of prepared piano on a few strings. About four or five strings of the harp appear to have some kind of putty attached to them: At least one of the strings in the higher range is "prepared" in the same way. This would certainly affect the timbre and resonance of the ...


11

The idea that touching a ringing open string exactly halfway will create harmonics that sound identical to a fretted note one octave higher, relies on three assumptions: Touching the string halfway will remove all odd harmonics. The even harmonics will sound like a fretted note an octave higher. This note will evolve and decay in the same way as a fretted ...


11

If the infrasound has overtones in the audible range, then yes you can hear them. The overtones could be completely separate waves independent from the fundamental - the ear can't tell, even though it tries to figure out which waves come from the same source by grouping together waves that appear to move as a tightly correlated single entity. (Which is the ...


10

The Musical Scale Search Tool offers four scales whose notes correspond to the OP, with only one -- C Minor Lydian -- containing the pitches in the order specified. The others would be permutations/modes of that scale. G#/Ab leading whole tone G#/Ab; A#/Bb; C; D; E; F#/Gb; G; G#/Ab; C minor lydian C; D; E; F#/Gb; G; G#/Ab; A#/Bb; C; D arabian D; E; F#/...


10

In this case the intent is clear. In one of the standard works on notation, "Behind Bars" by Elaine Gould, the author writes: The diamond remains hollow, regardless of its duration. Where the rhythm is not clear from its context, differentiate minims and crochets [half and quarter notes] by writing the rhythmic values as small notes in brackets ...


10

If you're using a tuner, then you can safely use the octave harmonic to tune. She is wrong in saying blanketly that "the harmonics are slightly flat". Some are flat, some are sharp, some match equal temperament exactly*. This page has a figure that shows the relative sharpness and flatness of the first several harmonics. Often people use "...


10

You get higher notes in cello pieces. Not often perhaps but they are there. Elgar's cello concerto and the William Tell overture would be two examples. Any professional cellist would not have a problem with that note. So my advice would be just to write it as a note.


9

It should be attacked three times. The melody and chords are clearly two distinct voices. Actually, I can't think of a context in piano music where you wouldn't attack a harmonic unison on two different beats as notated (unless there was a tie written in, of course). In contrast to some of the other answers, I don't consider this to be sloppy notation. If ...


8

Yes, this is possible, but this accounts for a minority of musical sounds that we use. One example in practice is the electric bass guitar, when tuned very low. Here's an extreme example of a bass tuned to C#0, or 17.32Hz. You can clearly hear the bass, although its pitch might be hard to discern. More commonly, you might hear a bass tuned to B0 (30.87Hz,...


8

The harmonic series, 1, 1/2, 1/3, 1/4,... only agrees with the physics for thin low-tension strings. A piano (even at the top) has relatively thick, high-tension strings. The harmonics tend to get sharper. There's a formula taking into account thickness and tension. Basically, the higher frequencies are raised by the square root of the tension over the ...


7

Pinch harmonics, just as any other harmonics, produces one of the notes belonging to the harmonic series of the note, that is: octave octave + 5th 2 octaves 2 octaves + major third (flat) 2 octaves + fifth 2 octaves + minor seventh (flat) 3 octaves and so on - see the entry on the Harmonic series on Wikipedia. The ones I put in bold will be probably the ...


6

The open string produces a particular note, say one octave below the first harmonic. Why does that open note (which contains other harmonics - strongest usually being the first) sound so different? As explained by Doktor Mayhem, when you play harmonics you remove components of the harmonic series. Harmonic on the 12 fret removes the first harmonic (...


6

This is called "12-tone equal temperament", and it involves dividing the span from our fundamental note to its first harmonic – i.e. from a fundamental frequency to double that frequency – into 12 equal ratios. So from one note to the next we have a ratio x such that if we took 12 of them (that is, if we considered x to the power 12) we would get ...


6

I think you're right to be suspicious of this idea! For a start, if we're talking single notes, there's no such thing as a 'false note' in absolute terms - Each reference pitch and temperament of a given fixed-note scale will have a given set of 'true notes', and every pitch would be 'true' for some combinations of scale, reference pitch and temperament. If ...


5

You can find detailed acoustic information on both trumpet and flute (and many others) on the Music Acoustics website for the University of New South Wales. Here are the pages for Brass instruments Flute In particular, the trumpet spectra and the flute spectra Similar information is available in The Physics of Music and Musical Instruments, by David Lapp,...


5

This is more complex than it might seem. The paper, "A Practical Guide to Intonation and Tuning for unaccompanied ensembles and vocal groups" by Karel van Steenhoven discusses the matter in some detail. Each harmonic transition needs consideration (assuming that one is trying to keep intervals in some assigned temperament such as Just Tuning.) ...


5

Since it is an electric violin, what you're hearing is likely sympathetic resonance with the other strings through the bridge. This effect is taken advantage of by the Hardanger fiddle, which uses sympathetic strings strung underneath the main playing strings. You could test this by tuning the other strings down a semi tone and see if that changes the "...


4

One way to play it that might make it easier is to split this chord in two bows: the first 4 notes in a down-bow (G-D-Bb-G) and then do an up-bow to play the harmonic. Check for example minute 5:26 of this video (at speed x0.5 for best observation):


4

Put in simple terms, when a string is touched at exactly its half-way point along the length, and made to vibrate, the note's pitch is exactly one octave higher than the original, open string. The string is mechanically effectively split into two equal halves, and by touching there, it introduces a node - a point along the string which doesn't vibrate. When ...


4

One factor that nobody has mentioned is finger thickness. When you touch a string lightly to produce a harmonic, there is a single point of contact; but when you press the string onto the fingerboard, keeping your finger in the same position on the string, the length of string that is free to vibrate is reduced by half the width of your finger. This will ...


3

Why doesn't a guitar string vibrate at one frequency only? Harmonics in general are produced by systems which have a non-linear response, like a string. One way to understand harmonics is to look at mathematical operations, like Fourier transforms, or other transforms. These operations convert (transform) an integral equation of some quantity, typically ...


3

Harmonics are produced when a string is touched at a node. That is, a spot where the string can split an equal number of times. The obvious one is the half way point - fret 12 on an open string. It's the easiest one to produce - the node itself being slightly wider than others further away, and is also the loudest. On an open string, the next node splits the ...


3

I can't think of one, but two modifiers you may consider are acoustic and spectral. And in the absence of better terms, I would argue that something like "acoustic octatonic" or "spectral octatonic" could be meaningful. "Acoustic" is often used to indicate a connection to the harmonic series, like with the "acoustic scale,&...


3

There are several ways to intonate a note on a violin. A basic way of intonation is to listen to the "ringing" notes. That is the notes which resonates with the open strings. An example: play a D on the A string (third finger on the A string). If that note is exactly one octave above the open D string it has a resonance which violin players call a &...


2

What exactly is the pitch of a pinch harmonic sound? It's a harmonic, done in a specific way. Often, you press the node with your fretting hand and hit the note with your picking hand, but with the pinch harmonic, you're doing both with your picking hand. The harmonic most guitarists first encounter is the one at the 12th fret, which is the octave of the ...


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