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1

The explanation and understanding can be found in the physics of vibrating systems (and a little bit in basic definitions). A harmonic series is defined by the relationship fn = n*f1m n = 1, 2, 3, ... If f is a frequency, say 110Hz, then the harmonics are 220, 330, 440, ... etc. A "simple" wave form or signal has a single frequency in it and is ...


10

If you're using a tuner, then you can safely use the octave harmonic to tune. She is wrong in saying blanketly that "the harmonics are slightly flat". Some are flat, some are sharp, some match equal temperament exactly*. This page has a figure that shows the relative sharpness and flatness of the first several harmonics. Often people use "...


-1

First of all- WOW! So interesting, I hope you come back here and do a lot more of these! I think what's happening here is the difference between natural harmonics and equal temperament. If you can find a sample of someone playing the song in just temperament for a long time and then equal temperament, you might throw up. Not exaggerating, it's really ...


7

The harmonic series, 1, 1/2, 1/3, 1/4,... only agrees with the physics for thin low-tension strings. A piano (even at the top) has relatively thick, high-tension strings. The harmonics tend to get sharper. There's a formula taking into account thickness and tension. Basically, the higher frequencies are raised by the square root of the tension over the ...


0

The diamond note heads seem to be incorrect. The viola parts on IMSLP (the 1924 French manuscript) are notated martelé, but with regular note heads. Listening to recordings of both the suite and the ballet suggest the same: martelé, but not harmonics. (However, the bowing technique, to my ear, does produce a sound that might be confused with harmonics.)


1

As more of a math person than a music one, I would simply call it a "linearized octave" scale. Not that I have ever met something like it. It has second and fifth in common with the Pythagorean scale... and nothing else sounding familiar. Transposition will be ugly even compared with Pythagorean. On the other hand, a harp-like instrument tuned to ...


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