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1

The difference between rock-and-roll and country music, say, isn't just the instruments; they also tend to use different chord progressions. You can't change the chord progressions just by changing the timbre.


1

You can do this on an ordinary PC or Mac these days. There is even some free software out there. You can manipulate and overlay waveforms to your heart's content. You can choose from accurate-sounding musical instruments and write a full orchestral score, then play it back - all on the computer. You could easily make some of Mozart's early pieces sound like ...


2

Can you change some composition I wrote to whatever music you want just by changing the timbre of the instruments? If the arbitrary timbre for the instruments must be fixed over the performance of the music, then no. For instance if you make a composition that consists of nothing but a single voice playing the same note, no choice of alternative timbre will ...


4

You seem to be asking more than one question, or convoluting several ideas together to create this scenario in your mind. Almost everyone has offered an answer that addresses "cancellation", which would turn off the sound. But you have stated... "I think you could, given a sound source, to change a second sound source so that the sum of the ...


9

Destructive interference would effect what you hear, but that doesn't change the composition. You could do other things to make a performance or playback inaudible, like move very far away or put a jackhammer next to the listener. Interfere however you like, that won't change the composition, because the composition is purely conceptual.


2

Your question pertains to physics. First of all, you mentioned using destructive interference to produce silence and backed your argument by the example of noise cancellation process in headphones. True but not always. In a 3D space, the sound waves are generated in all directions and in the form of longitudinal waves(in air) so this makes perfect noise ...


4

As John Belzaguy said, this is much about science, I'll try my best to put that in a musical point of view. In theory, what you are are saying is yes: two waves can cancel each in the process called destructive interferences. This is the process used for tuning a guitar using harmonics. However, there are a few problems… Coherency of the waves In order to ...


8

You can do this. All you need to do is invert the signal, i.e. generate a waveform that is the exact negative of the input waveform and add it to the input so there is no signal left. This is how noise-cancelling headphones work. Then you add in your own signal. Why anybody would go to the trouble of doing this, is a completely different question.


1

Rather than simple EQ, which as you've already seen kills all frequencies in the band you're dialling out rather than just in some instruments, I'd instead opt for Multi-Band Compression. How you implement this is going to depend on what your music source is. On a Mac, it's pretty simple - get a hold of SoundSource & add it into your music routing For ...


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