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Equation to calculate the expected frequency of a natural harmonic at any location on the fretboard

I don't think trying to make an equation for that would be viable, but let's try. If you touch the string in half, you will get double frequency. If you touch it in one-third of two-thirds of its ...
Ramillies's user avatar
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2 votes

Equation to calculate the expected frequency of a natural harmonic at any location on the fretboard

There are theoretically hundreds of harmonics available- although only a few actually ring out clearly and get any use. Rather than a general solution, the best approach may be to hard-code the few ...
Edward's user avatar
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1 vote

Confusion about overtones and a slow-motion video of a plucked string

In addition to what Edward said: the waveshape in the image you posted is a graph of sound pressure over time, while the actual string in the video is a graph of string displacement over its length ...
benrg's user avatar
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14 votes

Confusion about overtones and a slow-motion video of a plucked string

The Fourier transform allows us to decompose the shape of the string into a collection of sinusoids which correspond to the fundamental frequency and the (mostly) audible harmonics that give the note ...
cuppajoeman's user avatar
16 votes
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Confusion about overtones and a slow-motion video of a plucked string

At a basic level, the waveshape in the image you posted is a graph of sound pressure over time, while the actual string in the video is a graph of string displacement over its length. The two are ...
Edward's user avatar
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2 votes

Confusion about overtones and a slow-motion video of a plucked string

Disclaimer: I don't know the physics well, just combining what we see there with what we experience. The string in the video is plucked closer to one end than the other, much like a guitar or many ...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
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8 votes

Confusion about overtones and a slow-motion video of a plucked string

The waves that we can see traveling along a resonating string are not the same as the waveform we hear when that same string is amplified. One major thing you’re missing is that the waveform pictured ...
Todd Wilcox's user avatar
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