Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 175 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange

Hot answers tagged

10

You write an augmented 6th chord on the flattened supertonic by applying the same Italian/French/German formula to the flattened supertonic as the conventional Italian/French/German Augmented 6ths do to the flattened submediant. For example, in C Minor, the German Augmented 6th on the flattened supertonic is D♭ - F - A♭ - B, while the regular old ...


8

The minor seventh chord is indeed a pretty consonant chord, and this can be explained with objective maths. Recall that Western harmony is based on just intonation frequency-ratio. Most well-known, a major chord in JI consists of frequencies in ratio 4:5:6. Generally, a major third is 4:5 and a minor third 5:6. Now see what happens if you compose these ...


7

You are correct that resolving the German 6th to a V results to parallel fifths (Ab + Eb -> G + D). This is one of the rare times where the parallel fifths are allowed. People refer to these specific parallel fifths as Mozart fifths. They call them as such because Mozart did this quite often. Wikipedia provides some examples from his works and this one from ...


7

Although this is a large leap, it's certainly acceptable in this style. But what's most important is how you resolve this leap. Typically, a large leap is immediately followed by stepwise motion in the opposite direction; this is sometimes called "gap fill." Thus your tenor line will want to progress from this E down to D and C♯ (or something similar)....


6

As a bass singer in an amateur SATB choir I think this is acceptable. I haven't played the notes, but going from the 4th note on a scale to the 5th (only an octave lower) and back to the 1st note is not uncommon. The key question is probably how well notes fit a given harmony in general and how well they fit the respective chords. Singing Bb C F in your ...


6

Typically the German augmented-sixth chord resolves to a cadential six-four before resolving to the root-position dominant chord. Since the cadential six-four has scale-degree 3, there's no possibility of having these parallel perfect fifths between scale-degrees 3/6 and 2/5. The Italian and French augmented-sixth chords don't have scale-degree 3 either, so ...


5

an answer to this question should at least contain the hint that this chord Db-F-Ab-B is used in Jazz as tritonus-substitution of the V7b5: G-B-Db-F-Ab (V7b5b9) the dominant 7 chord with dim5 and min9. see example 2: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tritone_substitution and yes, the voice leading is the same as in the German 6th: we'll have the same 5th ...


5

The most common version of this, in my experience, is actually the French augmented-sixth chord built on the lowered second scale degree. In C, this creates D♭–F–G–B. This would be a French sixth in the key of F, but in the key of C it actually functions as an altered dominant. Since the V7 in C is G–B–D–F, this French chord on scale-degree ♭2 is just a V7♭...


5

...enharmonic respelling of D dim7 to fit better with the key of C minor. I don't follow your meaning. That chord is probably best described as viio6/5 tones `D F Ab B♮). As far as resolution goes, I think what you have in the bass clef is the standard thing: viio in first inversion with the leading tone and supertonic moving in contrary motion to the ...


5

Depending on how this is voiced, this F♯ might be better understood not as a chord tone but as a passing tone from the G in the first chord to the E in the last chord. For example: Some musicians have a habit of making a chord out of every vertical stacking of pitches. But sometimes (perhaps most of the time?) there's a melodic explanation that is ...


5

It could be G - B - D - F# ( G + Bm) which is the Gmaj7 chord // G can be something else besides the bass note, and then it would be a Gmaj7 chord in some inversion. With B as the bass note it would be Gmaj7 in first inversion. Something else that is really common in harmony, that can easily be done in your chord progression is to play the G chord, then ...


5

I'm reminded of that quote from the US version of The Office: "What's the safest way to go skiing? Don't ski!" The rule suggesting contrary motion isn't because there's anything inherently better about contrary motion. Rather, it's that contrary motion is a means to an end in preventing forbidden parallels like parallel perfect fifths and octaves. Contrary ...


5

Truck driver gear shift. Use it if you want to sound trite. (But sometimes trite is right :-)


5

Open up any classical theory book that covers cadences. They will go over V-I, V, VI-I, V-i, ect all in tonal contexts. You were building your theories with this in mind, but you need to remember classical theories all stem from the idea of tonal harmony. You are using the primary chords and the leading tone to get back to the tonic. When focusing on the ...


4

By definition, playing a Gm7/B♭ chord means the bass voice must sing a B♭. If you want to modify the second chord so that the bass voice doesn't jump by a seventh, try bringing that B♭ down an octave (or raising everything else appropriately) so the B♭ resolves up to a C. That should sound much smoother. Alternatively, you could invert your V chord. I ...


4

It's clear enough what you mean by "parallel modulation" but the textbook definition of modulation is a change of tonal center, a change of tonic. It seems change of mode applies regardless of the extent of mode change. This seems merely a matter of terminology. I suppose if you want a way to distinguish between the extent of the change - like modulation ...


3

I might be in the minority here, but I think this is just a part of early tonal practice: writing a chord that our ears expect to resolve a particular way, but earlier composers resolved it "incorrectly" while still resolving all of the tendency tones. I see this in Corelli relatively frequently. Imagine a V65 chord that resolves to scale-degree 1 in the ...


3

If you want to maintain the same chords and also want the top/melody line to stay the same, I would just go with one of these:


3

If modal stuff worked tonally, and tonal stuff worked modally, we wouldn't be using two different, separate terms. The only modes that work in what we percieve a tonal way are the Ionian and to a degree, the Aeolian. The latter, because we feel the need to have a leading note, and that's only afforded when we change Aeolian into harmonic or melodic minors - ...


2

There are no absolute rules. If you are writing something in a particular style - for an exam for instance - then there may rules for that style, but apart from that case when you are being creative you can do whatever you wish. Other factors may of course be relevant. It needs to be singable for instance. Other than that do what you want - make it sound ...


2

Same as 2 part writing really. Contrary motion between the outside parts is the extreme opposite of naughty consecutives! (I'm not saying that parallel motion WILL always cause consecutives!) You don't have to do it ALL the time. But it's useful when a 'full' harmony is the aim. (But remember, you don't always want to sound like a 19th century hymn tune). ...


2

Since the first chord is already a G, I think I would probably just call it Gmaj7 which is G B D F#. If the added G is in the bass, you could also just call it a Bm chord over a G in the bass, which would be notated like this: Bm/G A Bm6 chord would be B - D - F# - G# instead of G natural.


2

Contrary motions in harmony exercises are good because they remove the chance for parallel fifths and octaves to a great degree. Off course you can have passages move in parallel but you need to be sure you don't commit the offense of parallel 5ths / octaves. Generally having your voices move in parallel is a bit more of an advanced way of doing harmony, ...


2

The bass just moves ^4 ^5 ^1 or FA SOL DO or Bb C F. I think the ideal thing is for ^4 ^5 to be an upward step rather than a descending 7th. But, the upper voices need to be reviewed. According to Piston's Harmony ii V (including ii6 V) is different than other descending fifth root progressions. Instead of the upper voices moving up by step to the next ...


2

I think B-D-B on the second beat shouldn't be disregarded too readily, but the implied harmony is rather E⁷ than G. This could be brought out even more by going full in with the leading tone: X:1 L:1/4 M:C K:C %%score T1 Tn B V:T1 clef=treble V:Tn clef=treble-8 V:B clef=bass % 1 [V:T1] c B A A | G4 [V:Tn] E ^G A c | B4 [V:...


2

The suggestion of descending-fifth motion is definitely referring to the root motion, not the bass motion. Your I–vi–IV–V progression is very common, but not in these inversions. Depending on what style you're in, creating bass motion of a descending fifth (like you have) can result in "illegal" uses of six-four chords, non-resolved tendency tones, etc. ...


2

This is basically a modulation from the relative major F back to D minor. The progression after the "F7" chord is V-of-iv, iv, V7, i, V7, i in D minor, i.e. D7 Gm A7 D A7 D I wouldn't describe the chord in the second bar as "F7" and go looking for a non-standard way for a dominant 7th chord to resolve. It's just an F major chord with a passing note in ...


1

Steve Kahn came up with a simple chord construction technique for jazz chords played on guitar that profoundly affected my guitar playing. First, in any jazz group, the root notes of the chords are usually played by the keyboardist, the bassist, or both. So the guitar player doesn't have to play the root notes. They can, but they don't have to. Second, ...


1

From How does Pat Martino's Minor Concept relate to his Diminished Concept? : The so-called diminished concept is just a way of memorizing the shapes of the four inversions of dominant seventh chords by lowering one of the four notes of the diminished chord. By its symmetrical structure, the four inversions of the diminished chord have the same shape ...


1

The main difference between these two chords is the interval between the 7th and the (octave of) the root. For a major 7th chord, it is only a semitone, which lends bite to the sound. For a minor 7th chord, it is a whole tone. This together with the presence of two perfect 5ths makes the chord very stable.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible