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I assume that progression repeats... ||: G D/F# G/B C :|| ...alternating I with IV and V is rock solid - all roots by fifths and fourths. As for the bass line, the other answers point out the F# is the leading tone in G major and has the tendency to go up to G. But that isn't an absolute rule. It depends on what happens as the progression unfolds. If the ...


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It's possible. I wouldn't recommend it in a harmony exercise where you're required to follow the rules of SATB voice-leading though. (Is this the WHOLE musical story, or just how guitar chords are being voiced over a separate bass instrument?)


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In addition to Olli's answer, depending upon what style/genre you're playing, the D/F♯ chord will want to resolve a bit differently. The F♯ is scale-degree 7 in the key of G. It's also known as the leading tone on account of its strong tendency to resolve (or "lead up") to scale-degree 1. This tendency is especially strong when the leading tone ...


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Yes thats correct. The I V I IV cadence you're showing is in the key of G(major) and holds the I chord in root position (G - B - D) V chord in first inversion (F# - A - D) I chord in first inversion (B - D - G) IV chord in root position (C - E - G) So the bassline goes like G - F# - B - C Slashchords are read like [Chord/Bassnote]. If ...


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There are several responses to this. One is (as ttw's answer notes) that other harmonies (such as ii, iii, and vi) can be interspersed among the primary notes of the schemata. But I think there are several other answers, including: The question seems to be only considering a subset of Gjerdigen's schemata. The very first schemata Gjerdingen discusses is ...


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One common contrapuntal technique is to take a chord like C-E-G and change to a C-E-A; it's called the 5-6 technique by some authors. (Bach liked this technique apparently.) Obvious other examples are just taking C-E-G and making C-Eb-G (thence to C-Eb-Ab creating movement down four flats by only making two chromatic tone changes.)


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Gjerdingen's work on schemata does show some use with secondary chords. (ii and vi and iii) The point is that the schemata are not complete; there may be notes (and chords) between elements of these schemata. A simple V-I may become a ii6-V-I or ii6-F6-V-I or the like. Similarly for schemata. The actual chemata need not occur contiguously but only need to be ...


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Given your progression, it seems like it could be an F augmented leading to the B♭ rather than just F. F+ is F A C♯. That C♯ leads nicely to the M3 of B♭ (D), while the A of the F+ leads chromatically the same way (up) from A to B♭.(As far as the harmony is concerned).


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Given the note progressions you provide (F-A-C-C# and B♭-E♭-F-B♭), I would argue that your piece is in either of those: B♭ melodic minor: B♭ C D♭(C#) E♭ F G A (ascending) | B♭ C D♭(C#) E♭ F G♭ A♭ (descending) B♭ harmonic minor: B♭ C D♭(C#) E♭ F G♭ A As opposed to F major. Both scales are good for jazz and blues (I would recommend harmonic minor personally, ...


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Another angle to approach this from: If you really want to play a certain chord change, say I-IV, but you find it too "slow" or plain, perhaps the key lies not in more complicated harmony, but in better arrangement. I assume you have your own preferences that lead you to that particular chord change. If you feel something is too slow or plain, try adding a ...


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Root progression by descending third like I vi IV ii is a standard thing in classical and pop music. I think you should not consider it a retrogression. Technically harmonic retrogression means not following the functional flow of pre-dominant, dominant, tonic. The descending thirds progression is all pre-dominant in that sense. If it continues to a dominant,...


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An obvious solution is to merely shift the first bass note down an octave. But the V - I bass line is so strong, I don't really mind it being approached by such a large jump. Not sure you'd better try that one in an elementary harmony exam though :-)


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To other answers that highlight the cycles of thirds here, I'd just note that it's a bit anachronistic to think of these as "Coltrane changes," as Coltrane didn't use them yet. And (as has been well-known for quite a few years) Coltrane himself likely was inspired by Slonimsky's Thesaurus (in one form or another -- the book was very influential on a lot of ...


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On a superficial level it illustrates that a ii7 - V7 - I sequence can take you just about ANY place. Up or down a major 3rd takes you somewhere that is neither adjacent or closely connected in any of the standard 'Cycle of 5ths' or 'Modal interchange' ways. New territory. Which, in my book, is sufficient reason for exploration! And, of course, ...


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What is harmonically going on in the B section of this song? Why did the song writer choose rapidly descending major thirds, which will put most listeners off balance, followed by an ascending major 3rd? The explanation is in the lyrics. All at once I lost my breath <---Bb then DOWN to the new ii V (also a descending melody) And all at once was ...


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The Main Characteristics of Romantic Music https://www.rpfuller.com/gcse/music/romantic.html Freedom of form and design. It was more personal and emotional. Song-like melodies (lyrical), as well as many chromatic harmonies and discords. Dramatic contrasts of dynamics and pitch. Big orchestras, due mainly to brass and the invention of the valve. Wide ...


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Let me try to unpack the quotation a bit. Romantic characteristics: "Chromatic expansion": more possibilities for use of chromaticism, in context, I think this refers mostly to harmonic patterns (like chromatic chord progressions you wouldn't generally find in Bach or Mozart, for example) "Development of striking elaborations of linear tonal syntax": "...


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Look into Arabic pop music (ie: Najwa Karam, Amr Diab, Fairouz, Nancy Ajram) and classical music (Umm Kulthum). I would not bother with "modern composer" explorations into 24tone; because that stuff is almost completely academic music that nobody actually listens to in the real world. But, Arab music (Maqam) is exactly what you describe; and there is a ...


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Two composers who have worked with 24-tone equal temperament are Charles Ives (Three Quarter-Tone Pieces) and Ivan Wyschnegradsky (24 Preludes for Two Quarter-Tone Pianos). Wyschnegradsky has also apparently written Manual of Quarter Tone Harmony. He also used other divisions of the octave. If you want to learn about non-12 divisions of the octave in ...


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Yes - I've written in various tunings. Live performances are elusive though, as the musicians can't tell if they're hitting the right notes! I did write something for two sopranos and a piano where one of the singers had the 'in-tune' accompaniment in her cans and the other an 'out-of-tune' accompaniment. Crucially neither singer could hear the other! The ...


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When looking for a new, interesting harmonic colour in a piece of music, we don't go through a catalogue of 'permitted' modal interchanges. We MIGHT think 'let's try this chord shape shifted up or down a step'. Or perhaps 'let's try this chord with one (or more) notes slightly shifted'. Or even 'what's the GREATEST contrast I can find to the home chord?' ...


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Yes, it is called microtonal music. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microtonal_music Though in practice I don’t think anyone really uses all possible notes. A lot of the ”usual 12 notes” music uses only a subset of the 12 pitches. And then again e.g. violin and wind instrument players and singers produce pitches that are not exactly on the equal-temperament ...


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Each chord change is to a chromatic mediant. To this list of notable examples add: Gesualdo, Moro Lasso a Renaissance madrigal and Orlande de Lassus, Prophetiae Sibyllarum. The sound isn't new or modern.


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One outgrowth is that this sequence creates an octatonic collection. More specifically, it creates the half-whole octatonic collection beginning on the roots of the triads. In fact, you can get this octatonic collection by using major triads, minor triads, minor seventh chords, and dominant seventh chords all separated by minor thirds, a feature used by ...


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To me, it sounds like a disconnect in audience expectations. OP claims to be making a rather exact transcription, adhering closely to Mozart's original pitches, textures, etc. OP's audience apparently wants a more free arrangement. These are two different things. Either explain your approach to your audience, and they will have to deal with it. Or write ...


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Now, I know that the second to last chord, I want to be either a B7 or a D#°7, since both of those are dominant function chords that will smoothly resolve to E major. I agree with you that the omnibus progression has to be in B7. But can E major be reached by an omnibus progression from C major or a chord closely related to C major? I don't know a trick ...


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