New answers tagged

0

In key A♭, V>I is E♭>A♭. You have all three notes of the A♭ triad in bar 2, but bar 1 isn't an E♭ triad. There's a couple of E♭ notes in the bass clef, the lower of which makes the potential chord in root position, but the treble clef is awry! The E♭ triad needs E♭, G and B♭. the latter two will go in either order on the treble clef. I guess you're ...


0

The V chord in Ab major is Eb major; however, the chord written in m. 1 is A diminished. Rewrite the first chord as Eb major, and you'll have it. The error message you're getting is letting you know that you're missing the third of the expected chord.


1

Your question is, as the scientists like to say, not even wrong. And that is remarkably good news! It is incredibly important to remember that above all else, music is subjective, not objective. Music theory is descriptive, not prescriptive - it attempts to explain post-hoc why music sounds good but cannot predict with certainty whether certain effects will ...


0

You've written the bass very low. Usual bottom bass note would be E. OK if you know you'll be using a singer with this range, but dangerous to write in a general-purpose arrangement. The main think the female voices have to do is not get in your way! If their parts are too melodically interesting, they'll sound like the melody. Or let them shine, and ...


0

What style do you have in mind? To me it looks like a Gospel or Spiritual. I don't think you plan a classic style song, so you can ignore the voice leading especially parallels, in contrary in Gospel style fifths are welcome. My advice is to sing your song like a canon, notating the chords and all the voices in one line (horizontally) and then write them ...


5

No. Functional harmony is great. So is non-functional harmony. It's good to trek the mountains heading for a destination, it's good to sit by the lake watching the colours of the light on the water. And it's good to mix the two. When you find something that sounds interesting it can be productive to analyse WHY it sounds interesting, and that won't ...


5

Those rules are more like guidelines. If all music had to stick to the 'rules', it would have run out of new ideas years ago! You can do whatever you like with music, chord progressions, etc., and have people give their opinions on the results. In the past, composers have 'thrown out the rule book' (whatever that may be!), and produced weird and wonderful ...


1

As in other comments and answers: there is no mandate that a suspension resolve (or that it be "prepared"). Further, there is no mandate in this example even to interpret the situation as a suspension: there are several plausible functional interpretations. More blatant unresolved suspensions, that play more a role of suspended-something, appear in ...


3

Your assessment is right, so is the voicing you wrote. It is a G13 chord (7,9,13) and it is a substitute dominant chord for C#7 going to F#m7. The strong G root, presence of the B and F notes in the chord and the function to the F#m leaves no doubt in my mind that it is a G dominant chord and not a slash or inversion chord. I think quartal voicing is pretty ...


-3

Yes, it's a substitution, but it's not G9add13, it's A7/G, or better, A7sus2/G.


2

As many have mentioned, this one DOES resolve. But yes, in today's music the sus4 chord is sometimes used as an entity in itself. It's called an 'Unresolved Suspension'. There was a similar, earlier relaxation of rules when the concept of an 'Unprepared Suspension' became allowed.


1

I agree with the deleted answer of pied piper: the note E is resolving to D. The chord note B is irrelevant. We can hear this as changing tone or like a suspension. There are many songs that contain this motif like when man loves a woman (Percy Sledge) or Hello (Lionel Richie). It has a touch of pentatonic, like in many spirituals. But like others say: why ...


6

note (E) just before the second chord which looks like a suspension This is a syncopation and anticipation, so the E note "belongs" to the Bm chord. Don't consider it as part of G (even though it would work as 6 of G). Melody anticipates the harmony. In this case it's just a slight rhythmic anticipation, but consider this section of Charlie Parker'...


3

It does resolve on D, the intervening B does not affect the resolution. However as Michael Curtis pointed out, the E is not a chord tone so not really a suspension. It is an appoggiatura and is very common in most music idioms. Another Beatles' song Yesterday makes much use of appoggiaturas. However in pop, rock, folk music etc. the pentatonic scale has such ...


9

What do you call a "suspension" that wasn't a chord tone in the initial chord? In other words, I think you shouldn't identify this as a suspension, because it doesn't suspend a chord tone in the first place. the line moves from a D which is a chord tone in G major to neighbor tone E, then when the chord changes to Bm the E is still a non-chord tone ...


-1

There is no problem, no suspension. One can use any notes one wishes over any chord, and one often does. Suspensions often do resolve, but they don't have to. In Classical days, they would frequently, but one can't treat pop music in the same way.


-1

It's not really a suspension since the E is a non-chordal tone in the first chord, but it's similar to a suspension, and it does resolve, to the D. The fact that there is a B between is irrelevant. Remember this is a pop song, not classical harmony. Pop music generally doesn't need to resolve suspensions, so there's no special name for one that's unresolved.


1

The chord sequence seems to be a modified cycle of fifths (with some substitutions). As long as the voice-leading is good (especially between the soprano and bass), most progressions work. The only seeming out-of-place chord is the F7. It does share two tones (A and C) with the D7 three tones with a Dm chord (F, C, and D). The only tricky problem is the ...


3

The most simple explanation why this works so well is (to me): F6 is D7 with a blue note (minor 3rd). I've seen 2 different pdf: Am-D7-Cm7-F7 Am-D7-F67 Misty 1 Misty 2 both resolve to Gm7b5-C7b9-Fm7-Bb7 which is (ii7b5-V79)/ii7-V7 of Eb The F6 chord in question can also be interpreted as 1st inversion of Dm7 (a ii suspension before resolving to Gm a ...


2

In purpose of avoiding such parallels there‘s a rule that says the lead tone should not be doubled. This means - like Aaron says - when the chord is in 1st inversion we have the 3rd = A in the Bass and therefore we better don‘t have another lead tone A in the other voices. There are even other reasons for not doubling the lead tone from the acoustical aspect!...


4

The note A is the leading tone in Bb major. Since the chord is required to be in first inversion, the A in the bass is necessary. That means that the tenor needs to be changed to C or F.


4

The minor scales (natural, harmonic, and melodic) are intended as descriptive of compositional practice. The dorian and aeolian (minor) modes are permutations of the major scale and have different functional meaning. The dorian mode is actually quite a lot older than the minor scales: its modern form dating back to the early church modes, and that named ...


-3

OK, it's the 4th minor scale. And Mixolydian is the 2nd major one. It's interesting to know whether a mode is major or minor in quality. Maybe, if you're really into labelling, interesting to debate whether Locrian is minor or in a diminished class of its own. We don't normally number them within these categories. But you can, if you like. Historically, ...


2

A key shift up a minor 3rd is very pleasing. It doesn't really fit into functional 'cycle of 5ths' reasoning, but at least it's validated by having a special name, 'chromatic mediant'. And yes, when you feel one coming on, preparing the ear with a i, iv or ♭VII chord is often useful. This tune also illustrates how a strong melodic line helps a modulation. ...


0

This is a complicated question as, as someone else stated I think, it depends on the definition of quality. Sure when you are learning in a quite traditional way in the UK and only talking triads then the main 'types' (I'm going to avoid the word 'qualities' due to the ambiguity ;) ) you are told about are major, minor, dim and aug. But as you mention ...


3

I looked up tendency tones in several of my textbooks and online and was surprised to read so many different definitions. But, somehow, I've developed the idea the tones of the tonic triad are stable and the other tones have various tendencies to move to those tonic tones. I guess I accumulated this understanding from many sources over time. Most of it is ...


0

Composers of all periods frequently leave chords of all varieties incomplete for any number of reasons, but most often for voice-leading.


1

With common practice period harmony, a C-B7-C chord progression interpreted as I-"VII7"-I can be interpreted as I-V7/iii-VI/iii instead, with the VI/iii simultaneously having a pivot chord interpretation of I.


-3

It is one of the standard passing-6/4-chord-progressions. Along with the cadential-6/4-chords and pedal 6/4-chords-progressions form the basis in standard harmony for how second inversion chords are used. These passing chords would actually be either, I6 - vii 6/4 - I 5/3 or I 5/3 - vii 6/4 - I6 (If I remember correctly.). I did these chords extensively in ...


1

The figures would still reflect the intervals above the bass, so X[7-4-2] or, possibly, X[9-7-4]. The Roman numeral would depend on the context. In common practice harmony C/D would be some kind of suspension, so X would be the chord of resolution. X cannot be determined from the information given in the OP. At minimum, we need to know the key and the next ...


2

I like to reduce music as: music = melody + chords + rhythm + timbre But these are not separate and independent - melody carries some bits of harmonic/chordal information and rhythm, a rhythm can be melodic (think We Will Rock You), and a chord voicing has a timbral aspect to it, etc. The bass is an elemental part of your chordal harmony. Bass is a part of ...


3

My advice - additional to other answers - is to play hundreds of Baroque and classical pieces arranged for Guitar or Keyboard with thorough bass notation, there you‘ll have the chords and a musically written bass line. From this examples you will be able to derive your own theory for good voicing and counterpoint. https://www.pdfdrive.com/search?q=Bach+...


7

If I understand you correctly, you might have a score like this... ...and because there are only two voices notated and no guitar chord symbols in the score you aren't sure what chords to play to ad-lib a fingerpicking accompaniment. If the music you are dealing with is Baroque or early classical style (my example above is from Handel), I think you could ...


5

The bass line should imply the harmony; normally, strong beats will get the root or third and perhaps the fifth (or even the seventh in some cases) of the implied chord. Weak beats can have any note but usually are either tied to the bass of the previous beat or fill in with other notes to make a walking bass line. Normally the bass moves more slowly than ...


7

Generally speaking C-F-G is known as a "sus4" chord. Historically it would be considered dissonant, but in modern music, especially jazz and rock/pop it's a very standard chord that would not bother the typical listener. In fact, it often has a very pleasing effect. Playing F and G together, out of context, would most likely be perceived as ...


4

Chords aren't named based solely on the notes in them, and most jazz players will add or omit notes from a given chord to derive a desired sound. There are three considerations for naming a chord: The notes in it; The context it appears in (i.e., its function); Convenience. Taking the example of a chord with a root, second/ninth, and a fourth/eleventh (C-D-...


1

Whilst a diminished chord appears to be stacked m3s, it actually isn't - quite. It's better to look at it from the more usual 1,3,5,7 aspect. Thus, C diminished seventh will have letter names C E G and B. The root stays as such. The third is a minor 3, the 5th is a diminished 5, and the 7 is a diminished 7. So, the 3 is called E♭. The 5 is called G♭. The 7 ...


2

The seventh of any chord is a second away from the octave. The issue at hand is not unique to diminished (seventh) chords. The basic interpretation of all seventh chords are stacks of major and/or minor thirds. A C# dominant seventh, for example, is (from bottom to top) is C#-E#-G#-B (M3-m3-m3). The seventh, B, is a (major) second away from the octave, C#, ...


2

I think part of the problem is how you called the chord generically a "diminished" chord instead of specifically "diminished seventh" or "diminished ninth" chord. As you stack up the thirds you need to keep those extensions in mind. But—a minor third up from the top note, Bb, is Db This introduces the same problem. You are now ...


0

This circled F is neither a passing nor a changing tone; instead, it's just a member of the chord! Starting with the soprano, the voices have C, F, and A—an F-major chord. So the bass is allowed to leap from A down to F because that F is a chord tone. As long as the leap isn't too large, there aren't really any stipulations for how to move to this F since it'...


2

Let's consider this Every interval of a "third" is a step over one note name, for example from C something to E something. The somethings can be e.g. natural, flat or sharp In a diminished chord you have three notes and TWO such steps In a fully diminished seventh chord you have four notes and THREE such steps C fully diminished seventh should be ...


1

Within tuning differences, I'd say your idea of a diminished chord as a stack of minor 3rds is correct. There are differences between diminished chords and the diminished 7th chords you mention in all but name - regular diminished chords have no 7th and consist of only 3 pitch classes (e.g. C♯-E-G). There are ways to name some diminished 7th chords that don'...


2

The intervals are minor thirds. But the naming convention comes from a formula using the degrees of the major scale. (1, b3, b5, bb7) So, the letter names must match this convention to provide the expected spelling of the chord. In your example, E#, G#, and B# are the 3rd, 5th, and 7th degree of C# maj. Hence their appearance in the spelling. You are now ...


5

yet they are complex and mysterious and rich Um, no, not the first two. They're entirely appropriate to the song, which is the key part. That's not about chord progressions though - it's much more about fingerpicking and strumming patterns. This may lead to some effect of inversions if you look at the theory, but that only derives from standard picking ...


4

As others suggested, the best way is to immerse in his songs, of course by listening, but I would add also "with paper and pencil", to study the chord progressions. I did that a few years ago, and it's interesting. With time you notice a few patterns "Oh this is interesting". Since you cite Don't think twice it's alright, I think you ...


0

Whether it is dissonant or not is a matter of cultural practice. However, splitting an octave in half (harmonically) means that the product of the ratio of these intervals is Sqrt(2). It has been known (at least from the time of Pythagoras) that this number is irrational; it cannot be written as a ratio of whole numbers. Thus, any "just" set of ...


6

First thing that comes to mind is that Dylan can go off the chords you'd expect in any key. First example is actually a song he covers but didn't write, "Baby Let Me Follow You Down". G F Baby let me follow you down C Eb Baby let me follow you down G D C D I'll do anything in ...


10

The best way to start is by learning all of the Dylan songs you like. Transcribe them or if that's too hard at the beginning try to find transcriptions that other people have made. Once you have digested Dylan's harmonic language you'll probably come up with ideas to develop it in a different direction, and finally you'll develop you own personal voice.


2

Using this Wikipedia page list of chords for the jazz minor scale, if you had chords D7sus G7 Cmin6 With Roman numeral analysis you would say that is V7/V V7 i. If the first D chord had a minor third you would use ii. Of course using the sus dodges the whole question of specific chord quality. There is no raised fourth degree in the scale so I don't see the ...


0

The melodic minor scale has different notes when ascending from when descending so it would seem to me to be a bad choice to use this as the basis for developing chord substitutions for people to solo over. My advice would be to keep it simple and be guided by what you hear rather than musical theory. Precise technical description in musical terms of what ...


Top 50 recent answers are included