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7

"S.H." stands for "sons harmoniques" (harmonic sounds). The circle above the note provides the same information. The harmonic is a popular effect in harp music. Although the octave harmonic is the most common harmonic in the harp repertoire, fifth, double octave and third harmonics can also be produced. On some strings, even more harmonics can be produced....


6

The overlaid circle and plus generally mean damping a string. Combining that with small noteheads and a range shows which strings to damp. Harmonically this makes sense here, to prevent those low strings, plucked in the previous bar and a half, from polluting the C major chord that follows. Here's another example of exactly that symbol, along with ...


5

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5

30lb line should fine on those two top strings. We've used it on 100s of koras at that point. You could of course always try line a couple of pound lighter as every kora is slightly different, and worth a go, but it is more likely to be something else. Just to add to the information above - if the line always breaks at the same point, as suggested above, ...


5

I’m assuming that everywhere you said A and E you actually mean Ab and Eb, right? The answer definitely isn’t c), glissando should only be used for sweeps across all strings, but there’s no pedal position that can produce exclusively 2 pitches. In fact, out of all 2,187 possible pedal combinations, the fewest distinct pitch classes possible is 4, and only 42 ...


5

Playing blues on a harp, drawing is the way to go. Blowing on, say, a C harp will give you the notes of that chord - C. So the blues notes, mainly, give the chord a fourth away - G. So, for a song in G, you'd need a C harp. To calculate what you need, know the guitar key, and count backwards 5, or more simply, forwards 4. As in, song's in A, use D. Song's ...


4

It's obviously better to replace the string with its actual string, but as I'm sure you're aware the adjacent strings are a similar gauge and should not pose any issues, if you don't make a habit out of it. I'd suggest stringing it up with the 3rd octave E String and ordering a replacement string as soon as possible. It would be more harmful to leave that ...


4

Harps are written in concert pitch on a grand staff. If you read piano music, you can read harp music. Musical concepts like phrasing, articulations, dynamics, etc. will be similar on the harp and the piano (and other instruments for that matter.) Technical details are very different. A harp is quasi-diatonic (at least the big orchestral harp) in that it ...


4

Yes, you have to make your fingers work backwards from what you're used to on the guitar. While playing the harp is possible with the palms facing outward, it's extremely awkward and the fingers are limited in their motion. I'm not aware of anyone who does it, although I wouldn't be surprised if Harpo Marx tried it out. It's similar to playing the piano ...


4

Generally, for blues, if guitar plays in C you would use an F harp. This is to get the Bb ("blue 7th"), otherwise known as Mixolydian mode. In general, you want the harp whose key is a perfect 4th above the key of the blues. So: For a E blues, an A harp For a D blues, a G harp and so on.


4

Having thought about this some more, I've decided to rewrite my answer... Your doubts about the acoustic properties of the harp are understandable. When heard in an orchestral setting, the harp is relatively quiet, requiring careful orchestration if one wants it be heard within a multi-instrument texture. However, a concert pedal-harp is in fact capable of ...


3

There are many related horizontal stringed instruments, including the psaltery and zither. The sound box on those is underneath the strings, with the strings going over a bridge, while a harp has the sound box on one end of the strings. From the photos on Wikipedia, it looks like the qanun has multiple strings per note, where the harp only has one. This ...


3

Do yourself and your harpist a favor and pick up a little booklet called Harp Scoring by Stanley Chaloupka. In it you will find pedaling rules and tips and lots of examples. Good luck, and thank you for scoring for harp! https://www.amazon.com/Harp-Scoring-Stanley-Chaloupka/dp/B0006DY21E


3

One similarity between harp and piano that hasn't been mentioned is the spacial distribution of the tones. Like a piano, and unlike most other instruments, on the harp you have a scale under your fingers going from low to high in one direction, with the spacing not all that different from a piano. So if you can plunk out a scale on the piano, you can pluck ...


3

As guidot says, it's odd this isn't already included (at least, not that any of us three can apparently find). It should be an easy fix, so you might want to mention it to them! Here's one possible workaround: \version "2.19.48" global = { \key c \major \time 4/4 } upper = \relative c'' { \global R1 | } lower = \relative c { \global <g g'...


3

Allow me to recommend you touch base with your harp ensemble and ask them if there's anything you should know about what tuning system they will be using. I'm both a woodwindist and a harper, and sometimes harpers forget that woodwinds can't do everything, tuning-wise, they can. You should be advised that harps, because of their variety of historical forms ...


3

The number of tuning issues depends on your skill level and intonation. Between the two of you, it is much more likely that you'll be the one out of tune. Harps are chordophones and the by nature of the instrument take forever to tune (much like a piano) and go out of tune with generally the same frequency as a piano if not properly maintained. While ...


3

Apparently nylon Lyre strings are not readily available but I was able to locate one on-line seller offering the equivalent of nylon Lyre strings. From the site: These modern Fluorocarbon strings are a better alternative to plain nylon and are very popular with harp and ukulele as they produce a clear and strong sound, On lyres this is very effective on ...


3

The tensile stress on the material is independent of the thickness that you use: it depends only on the length of the string and the pitch you are tuning to. For a string of a given material, of a given length, it takes so many Pascals (or PSI) of tension (pulling force divided by cross-sectional area) to tune to a given note, regardless of whether the ...


3

Surfing various harp-help fora suggests that gut string life is never very long. Here's one bit of advice from some string-selling shop, Gut strings are covered with a protective layer of varnish or a lacquer that is slowly worn away by use. Once that protective layer has gone, the string will probably not last much longer as it becomes more ...


2

From an executional standpoint, it helps to know how the harp's mechanism works. The harp's pedals are laid into a zig-zag pathway, and have the same kind of spring tension in an upwards vertical direction as a piano pedal. However, the pedals can also be moved side-to-side to go through this pathway. When the pedal is all the way up, it can be pressed ...


2

'Stopping' on french horn is when you put your hand in the bell. This adjusts the pitch of the note and also has a muting effect. I am not an expert on this, however i found a good article on Wikipedia: This is the act of fully closing off the bell of the instrument with either the right hand or a special stopping mute. This results in producing a somewhat ...


2

You have probably obtained your harp long ago by now, but for future readers... One of the things about a 22 string harp that I would consider essential is that it have legs. The wobbliness of a "lap harp" held between the knees will limit most people. Legs give a stability that enables one to play faster, harder music with better technique and greater ...


2

Just to add to leftaroundabout's answer - I've always wondered how quickly (and quietly) the harpist can change these pedals on short notice. Notice the 2nd measure of this passage: Gustav Mahler (1860-1911): Symphony No. 10, 1st Mvmt. Reh. 26 + 3


2

Yes, harmonics are beautiful on the harp, and quite common. The symbol in sheet music for a harmonic is a small circle placed above or below the note head, usually opposite the stem. There has been some variation in how the harmonics are noted, as the legendary Carlos Salzedo liked to write the harmonic in the octave where it will sounds rather than where ...


2

Yes. There's a lesson on how to do it on YouTube. For the right hand, place the back of finger 2 on the centre of the string. Pluck with the thumb (finger 1), and immediately remove the whole hand to allow the string to vibrate. For the left hand, the technique is a bit different - the palm of the hand blocks the string instead. You end up with a note ...


2

Harmonics can be played on any stringed instrument. It involves touchng the string at a node. The simplest is the octave, which is exactly half way along the string. This gives a sound an octave above the open string, as it divides the string into two vibrating parts, which vibrate twice as fast as the original. Easy to do on guitar, as is the one third ...


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