11

You could produce tracks with some ordinary earbuds. It's just harder to know what exactly is going on in your mixes and whether it will translate well to other listening environments. It's general there are few things you want out of your listening environment: It's nice to have speakers/headphones that are as neutral as possible—there's no such thing as ...


8

Jam Hub is your saviour !It's an all in one piece of gear with inputs,mixer and headphone facility to do exactly what you need.With a different mix for each member, if needed.


7

Two possible reasons spring to mind. I'm assuming your regular amp setup will be summing the reverb to mono. Some stereo reverbs create phase-discrepancies which appear to push the stereo field wider, which leads to these possibilities... headphones introduce a very artificial stereo field, where the sound sources are 180˚ from each other, with no cross-...


7

Having faced this issue some times, the best reccomendation i can give you is first of all, listen to your recordings in various systems, the more, the best, because if you want the world to listen to it, you can never test every system in the world, so, try as many as you can and try to balance for the best in all the systems. Particularly, one of the best ...


6

What I would suggest is to use an Apogee Jam to plug the guitar into the laptop, where it can then use Amplitube to model the sound of a guitar. Then just play a backing track on the laptop, and listen with headphones. There are some disadvantages to this approach but it has been fairly convenient and produces a reasonably good result. You can also ...


6

You definitely want different sets for different situations. For playing live, you first want something with very good isolation. Then, depending on how and why you use them, you want to think about things like how easy and fast is to put them on/off, how easy is to move around with them, and their frequency response. You might not want them to be as ...


6

You are looking for a headphone amplifier. Many models have more than a single stereo output. Professional models often have more than one output (channeL) in the same module, and sometimes allow you to either feed the same signal to all the channels or have a separate signal for every channel (as you would do with a mixer that supports auxiliary outputs). ...


6

Yes, your normal headphones will work fine. When somebody says "monitor headphones" or "monitor speakers", it typically just means that they're calibrated for accuracy—the kind of accuracy you'd want for mixing music rather than just listening to it. Consumer-grade gear, on the other hand, tends to hype the bass and sometimes the treble a little bit. But any ...


5

I skimmed through your youtube video, and found a spot at about 1:07:08 or 1:07:09 that I think shows what you're talking about. We hear strings and piano, the drummer has some rests, nods his head with the beat and then comes in. In this case my guess is he isn't listening to a click track, because there is a conductor -- I saw the conductor at, for ...


5

It's most likely, with equipment made later than 1990 (and that's being pessimistic), that it doesn't matter at all. If you really want to be cautious, just take care with power amps connected to big loudspeakers. Turn these on last, but before beginning to play music. Turn the volume down to start, then bring it up to the level you need. This protects the ...


5

You should definitely not rely exclusively on headphones for mixing. There are some sound aspects that headphones just can't properly convey, in particular any phase cancellation between the channels. Nor should you make do exclusively with consumer speakers, because these are just too nonlinear to get a reliable spectral balance. But that doesn't mean you ...


4

This is what the impedance spec refers to: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrical_impedance It's nothing to do with sound isolation. I doubt there is any spec that can accurately represent the level of sound isolation. This is because the level of isolation is almost entirely dependent on the fit; How well they fit to your particular head shape and the ...


4

ATTENUATION. This is the technical term for a reduction in signal strength (i.e. a reduction in the volume). Isolation or cancellation? The other responders seem to miss that many solutions for noise reduction are using active inverse wave cancellation rather than passive isolation--which is what I recommend for maximum hearing protection and listening ...


4

You may want to consider the distinction between open backed and closed backed headphones. Open backed are usually considered to give better sound quality, and better bass response, but won't block any noise in the environment, and allow bleed-through if you end up recording via a microphone. Also, the fact that they allow air flow can make them more ...


4

Just mixing with headphones as recommended in a comment, is a bit risky, since the sound differs quite a lot from what you get with a couple of speakers. Some kind of monitors are definitely recommended. A good pair of monitors is obviously preferable, but the important thing is to know your monitors well. If you have a pair of imperfect monitors, but you ...


4

If you have a "line-in" input on your laptop, I have three suggestions: The quick and dirty one is to get a cheap adapter jack, connect your guitar to your laptop through the line-in input and use one of the zillions of free or commercial amp simulators on your computer. Unfortunately this will not give you good tone, because the guitar output is not ...


4

From speakers you hear the L and R channels with directional information but in a common space. On headphones you hear them almost completely separated. With some techniques of stereo mixing, this can give very different effects. There's also the possibility that either headphones or speakers (more likely speakers) are connected with the wrong polarity - ...


4

There are nice small mixers which accept input from the guitar and some other source and feed the output to a headphone jack // line out. For example, this series of mini-amps from VOX. Or this one from c-tech which has a little bit of mix & clean/dirty adjustment


4

A really cheap and cheerful way to hear it better is to rest the head on a table, or even better, a hollow wooden box. Works quite well on a tomtom (part of a drumkit) if you happen to have one kicking around. Or, look around for a second-hand practice amp. The last one I bought cost less than £15 and wrks well - it is actually a bass guitar practice amp, ...


3

Down your back, inside your shirt. Tie it round your belt to preserve the necessary spare cable. Extender as required for overall length, couple of quid from Maplin's etc.


3

It does make a difference, but not in the audio quality. In general it is a good idea to leave unused channels at their lowest amplitude setting to prevent accidentally blasting your headphones, speakers, or ears (which can happen in many different ways). In that sense, yes, it is better to turn volume regulators to mute for unused headphone amplifier ...


3

There are quite a lot of products available which take guitar signal and an aux signal, and combine them into a headphone. Here's some photos of some - one cheap, the other more upmarket. I googled "pocket practice amp aux". With these one, you would plug the large input jack into your guitar. You would connect an MP3 player (or whatever) into the 3.5mm ...


3

For playing at home, in my opinion there is nothing better than some amp simulators. Try GuitarRig or AmpliTube (I prefer AmpliTube). For playing at home and maybe making some recordings it is a really good solution. You just need a USB interface for your guitar and a pair of headphones. Install it on your computer and start to play. Both programs have lots ...


3

"Insane high quality music" is a bit of a misnomer. FLAC, same as MP3 & AAC, are usually ripped from CDs by other consumers with no real idea of what they're doing, so they're only 16-bit 44.1kHz anyway. 880kbps is a rational value for a heavily compressed FLAC [full rate, uncompressed is 1141kbps], but I wouldn't trust illegal torrents as far as I ...


3

If you're just learning how to play the notes, then you could rest it on something resonant, or not… it will do, but it won't gain you much overall. As a bass un-amplified sounds nothing like one that is amplified, you're not going to learn much except where the notes are. Even if you have to pick something up off eBay, Freecycle or a junk shop, get ...


2

Recording studios used to have (not sure if they still do) a set of 'ordinary' speakers to play back final mixes through. They were the sort that Mr. Average would have in his front room.Hi-fi, but not state of the art, just a fair sound. A bit like i-pods produce now.The eq. would be set flat. If your speakers already produce lots of bass, I can't ...


2

An effective way to have noise-isolating headphones is to use earphones under industrial muffs. You don't specify whether they are to stop others hearing what you're listening to, or to stop extraneous noise getting to your ears, but this will work either way.Obviously, full size headphones won't do it, but smaller, good quality in-ear phones will. The ...


2

Since the JamHub seems to be dead as a company at this moment, the only viable product with separate submixes seems to be Zoom LiveTrak L-12 (or L-20).


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