4

I'd suggest a wired set of headphones. Bluetooth has a delay/latency that you just wouldn't care about when listening to iTunes etc, but it will drive you mad playing guitar.


3

I don’t think there is any difference in sound quality, or at least if there is, it’s so minimal that it’s overshadowed by all the other design elements of the headphones. The reason why different impedances are available is to work better with different devices. If you buy the highest impedance set and plug it into your smart phone, you may find that even ...


3

The mic should only be a TS - it's mono. Simplest would probably be to take all the barrels off & actually check everything is managing to physically connect to the right connections. A continuity meter could be useful if you have one. If they don't match, grab a soldering iron & start swapping plugs. Make sure you get an accurate pin-out diagram of ...


2

Here is your manual: https://www.musikkhandel.no/media/files/2496/p45_en_om_a0.pdf According to your manual you have a headphone jack on the keyboard itself which deactivates the speakers so if you only want to hear the keyboard through headphones there is no need to go thorough the computer, all you need is a pair of headphones that have a 1/4” jack or a 1/...


1

You say "each component works well individually". Let's assume that your 3.5mm TRS-cable has been tested and that there is no problem with the adapters as such. In that case there are still several opportunities for problems: a) the conventions for ground and microphone input that your adapters use differ from the conventions your laptop uses. ...


1

If the source runs on a 3v power rail (a couple of AA batteries) or a 5v one (USB) you'll need low impedance cans in order to get any volume. With 12v, 24v or more to play with, higher impedance is appropriate. Neither is good or bad as such. Pick the ones that suit your equipment. It may be that high impedance cans are perceived as inferior by analogy ...


1

I use a headphone mixer 'Miniamp' by Behringer. 4 channels in, 4 out - all adjustable. Works nicely.


1

Adding a little to Todd Wilcox's comment, the device you need is a mixer with panning controls. Pan channel 1 to one side and channel 2 to the other (or blend them to find a nice stereo image) and you will be able to hear both separately through the headphone out from the mixer.


1

Simple and stupid option: use 2 sets of headphones. You will hear metronome sound even when its headphones are not directly over ears. Simple, stupid and somewhat technically advanced option: get 2 extension cords for headphones, cut them and connect the piano sound to one ear and the metronome sound to the other ear. You'll lose stereo effect, but it is ...


1

While more expensive keyboards have a metronome built in, a promising option for the CDP-120 (thanks to its USB-Interface) is: Connect keyboard to PC via USB for MIDI transfer (PC takes care of sound generation) Connect headphone to PC Install some metronome application there


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