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15

After a mononucleosis I had tendonitis twice in my right forearm. The things you can do: RELAX WHILE YOU PLAY!!!! That's the most important. Period. Ridiculously small amount of force you need when you play guitar. The approach of most people (including me, before I get to know methods of Jamie Andreas) is to use a lot of force, to ensure the string is ...


12

Small disclaimer about decibels For sound pressures, decibels are defined as follow: XdB = 20 log (p1/p0) with p1 being the amplitude of the pressure field of the sound, and p0 a reference (20microPascal of pressure). This translates in terms of power/loudness as: Pow_dB = 10 log(P1/P0) Because of this definition, you cannot simply add sound powers: 10 log((...


11

Sounds like you need to address several issues. You're probably squeezing the guitar neck way too tightly using your thumb more as a vice than a guide. Not necessary at all. You may need to change the angle you hold the guitar at- it could be pulled into your body.Let it out so that your fretting arm has fresh air all around it : too many players have the ...


10

Not only is this quite normal for a singer, it can actually be a sign that you're breathing correctly in the more intense passages. I first experienced it when learning to breathe from the diaphragm when I first began taking voice lessons. When we sing intensely, we tend to go through a lot of air. Compared to normal breathing, this looks an awful lot like ...


9

Overbite would only inhibit brass playing potential if your jaw caused your lips to close in a really odd way. You don't need straight teeth to play a brass instrument. If you're using your teeth / jaw to play brass, then you're headed for trouble. If your lips look like everyone else's when your mouth is closed / relaxed, then I can't anticipate you ...


9

All of the above. And if none work out, there's always the voice. I wouldn't say that a great singer is less musical, and less musically valuable, than any instrumentalist.


8

I'm a violinist, not a pianist, but it's very common for beginning violin players to have severe pain because they are too tense, especially when they are self taught. I'm going to suggest a few generic techniques to start minimizing tension. When you sit down at the piano, think about how you are sitting. Look for any tension, especially in your neck and ...


8

rock climbing does indeed hinder your fingers' range of motion, but not necessarily dexterity. Tenosynovitis: Your tendon sheaths around your joints get inflamed from regular and repeated rock climbing strain and they start to build up scar tissue. They thicken and drastically reduce range of motion, especially limiting your fingers' ability to touch your ...


8

I suspect that at the root of the problem is the fact that when singing into the vocoder, your brain doesn't get the expected feedback (the natural sound of your voice) and therefore instinctively tries to push harder on the voice. For example, you know what happens when you wear enclosed headphones and someone talks to you -- you want to reply, but you don'...


7

(This answer is written from the perspective of general knowledge of electronic equipment and is not specific to electronic organs.) Historically, vacuum-tube electronics could more readily start fires due to poor ventilation because each tube necessarily generates a lot of heat (containing a hot filament like a light bulb). Modern semiconductor-based ...


6

I taught myself guitar. As a result, I started off with crappy technique that caused injury to my hands. In order to stop the pain, I went back to the beginning and analyzed my personal ergonomics and then changed my technique. What I found worked for me was: Practicing fretting notes cleanly: My fretting fingers are close to the frets and press as ...


5

This sharp sensation at the tip of your fingers is usually a combination of a minor bone bruise, damaged nerves and damaged muscle tissue from using too much pressure when fretting a guitar and extended use. Your hand is full of what are called peripheral nerves that go from your spinal cord to your arms, hands, legs and feet. The nerve endings of the ...


5

According to a post at the New York University Medical School answer center, smoking and exposure to smoke irritate and dry the tissues of the throat, particularly the vocal cords. This leads to improper vocal cord vibration and function. Smoking also may promote acid reflux, which can affect the vocal cords. Finally, smoking degrades lung function, which ...


5

How I prevent it from coming back? To build on atoth's answer and his first point about relaxing your hand and arm: I feel it is worth mentioning to all others who come and see this question, the possibility of changing your seated guitar playing position to help in the prevention of these sorts of problems. Having started with a classical guitar and its ...


5

While it's true that some great players have long skinny fingers and seem to control each one completely independently with infinite precision, many others have had to work with less optimal biological toolsets. Exhibit A would definitely be Django Reinhardt, whose left hand was severely burned in a fire in such a way that he only had full use of two fingers....


5

If it hurts, it's wrong. Many players can play higher octaves all evening without pain. But to diagnose what exactly is wrong, someone would need to see and hear you playing. If you're lucky, posting a video would work. But more likely, you need a teacher or a more experienced colleague in the room with you to ask you to try different things and observe ...


5

There is no doubt that you don't have sufficient breath control here. I have experienced similar problems (clarinet, sax) as have friends on brass instruments while learning and improving our breathing & diaphragm control. When your lips or jaw get fatigued, stop and rest. But above all, my oft-used directive on Music.SE applies: Get Thee To A ...


4

I am a 71 year old woman and have played guitar for years. I have had to change techniques over time as the inflammation and pain has gotten worse. I find that playing an acoustic with strings that are close to the fret board is easier for me than playing electric. Also light strings help a lot. I use Agustine light (blue)) Since I can't curve my index ...


4

great discussion. I have Multiple Sclerosis which also makes my left hand numb at times (for days at a time). I have found using "open tuning" helps tremendously. I can make beautiful sounds with fewer fingers. I also have laid my guitar in my lap and play similar to a steel-slide guitar. I use my strongest finger to hold down the fret; I use light/ ...


4

Your reliable source is correct. The earplugs may not change shape over time, but your ears do. I don't think you need a rule of thumb -- you'll know when your earplugs aren't fitting well anymore, as they'll become either uncomfortable or ineffective. You should be able to feel whether they fit snugly in your ears. If they no longer fit comfortably, it's ...


4

I would say to make sure the action on your guitar is at the lowest it can be for ease of playing. Also, you may consider playing slide guitar if it hurts to press strings. Also look into open tunings, you may find songs that are easier to play as well. Hope some of this advice helps and don't give up.


4

Advice on this site sometimes involves getting a teacher. In your case, it's good advice. Maybe not long term, but just a couple or a few lessons. A good teacher will be able to see your 'problems' and turn them into positives for you, far better than answers here. Rockin Cowboy is spot on. Do not let the problems get in your way. Others with much worse have ...


4

In the long run, brass instruments require only one hand, for the most part. There are also several manufacturers who make one-handed versions of woodwind instruments, though these are quite expensive. But it's very hard for a four-year-old to start on these instruments. I would recommend piano. It has been shown to be an effective means of physical therapy ...


4

TRDR: Singing, from personal experience. Since birth, my right side has been paralyzed, though not as badly as your sister. I have had singing lessons for years, and I still find them very enjoyable. I have never felt like I was hindered at singing. Another reason to choose singing is that the technical part is easy, especially at the beginning. A ...


4

I used have sore shoulders after playing for an evening at an Italian restaurant in college. I finally figured out that it was because I was lifting my shoulder up to high while playing. In the moment, it seems expressive and natural, but turns out that it's much more natural to let your shoulders relax all the way, sit up straight, and make sure the ...


4

Find a really good physical therapist, preferably one who works regularly with musicians. I had tough issues 18 months ago with (what I thought was) tendonitis. I play sax, clarinet and guitar. It was severe enough to cause me to take a break from playing. I initially saw one specialist who thought it was carpal tunnel, and recommended various exercises. ...


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