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2

In addition to what @Tom_C said, another reason is that both earplugs and earmuffs are very good at blocking high-frequency sounds, but very poor at blocking low frequency ones. Presumably the "30dB reduction" assumes the sound is equally loud across some standard range of frequencies, but while wearing both pieces of gear, the "input" to ...


11

Small disclaimer about decibels For sound pressures, decibels are defined as follow: XdB = 20 log (p1/p0) with p1 being the amplitude of the pressure field of the sound, and p0 a reference (20microPascal of pressure). This translates in terms of power/loudness as: Pow_dB = 10 log(P1/P0) Because of this definition, you cannot simply add sound powers: 10 log((...


-2

Seems like a point of confusion on this question is actually the physics, not the math. A simple experiment you can try at home that explains why earplugs + earmuffs doesn't double the dB of attenuation: You need two powered speakers and a dB meter. Create a mono track in your favorite DAW of some sound source, pink noise would be perfect. Or if you have a ...


4

TL;DR: Subtracting 3 dB is done to avoid the underprotection that could result from variations in compute the rest of the NRR formula. But some manufacturers incorrectly (intentionally?) do not subtract 3 dB. The US Code of Federal Regulations - 40CFR PART 211-Product Noise Labeling (mirror) gives the following rationale: (v) Spectral uncertainty. Possible ...


2

Do you read french? If not, here is a small synthesis of what comes out from this document (mirror): First, the tests are not performed of the same samples of the population: SNR and NRR are expressed in terms of the percentage of the population they are intended to protect: 98% for the NRR and 84% for the SNR. This partially explains the difference. (...


3

Other than making a lead bucket that goes over your head, or maybe lead ear-caps that go under your earmuffs, I think you've pretty much hit the current technology for hearing protection. The ear plug / earmuff combination is pretty much standard for noisy environment work, such as near airplanes or loud equipment. There are some versions of earmuffs that ...


0

There could be all sorts of chord substitutions, extensions, etc that create deviations from the norm. But western music is really pretty simple. The most common movements within a key are I-->IV and back, and I-->V and back, also in there is IV-->V and back. If you play an instrument I'd recommend playing these simple cadences over and over and ...


1

LISTEN to the song. Over and over. Maybe slowed down, and in short sections. (There's a little program called Transcribe! that has all the tools you'll need in one convenient package, I highly recommend it.) Work out the bass note. Work out the other notes in the chord. Tip - it can be easier to tell what notes AREN'T there! Narrow your options. A ...


4

Having spent many happy years playing along to the radio and t.v., just doing that is my first recommendation! Once the key of a song has been established, life isn't that difficult. Initially, listen to where a song feels at rest, at home, could end there. That chord at that point is usually the root/key chord. Nine times out of ten, it'll be major. I don't ...


0

Depending on what kind of music you like and whether you are working up an arrangement of a particular song, or attempting to duplicate an already released song, or even attending a jam session and wishing to participate, there are a few different methods to decide which chords to play. Figuring chords for a Jazz piece can get pretty advanced and it usually ...


1

Without knowing whether having problems means it’s very difficult for you or you can’t do it at all I would suggest focusing on the bass and the melody. Try to figure out the bass line or root movement of the bass and the melody of a song first. Work no more than 4 or 8 bars at a time. The combination of these two things will give you some insight into what ...


3

I agree with answer given by topo Reinstate Monica. I would also add that in addition to the pitch discrimination threshold being frequency dependent and NOT absolute, this explains a person's ability to judge the difference of two notes played separately. A whole new set of acoustic and mechanical phenomenon occur when harmony is involved. When listening ...


6

With a bit of training, a good musician can hear differences of 2 cents, and with significant talent and/or a lot of practice, 1 cent. I base the above statement on my personal experience with developing ear training software for musicians. For example, I have been working on an app for training musicians to tune a guitar or a piano, purely by ear. This ...


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