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As others have said, it was never banned. To clarify diabolus in musica, this referred to the ambiguity of how to resolve it. Harmony had developed enough by the 1700s that B+F could resolve to either C+E or Bb+Gb. But back then, C major and Gb major were still considered distant keys. Something similar happened in twelve-tone music: certain hexachords ...


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It is my understanding that civilization originated in Africa and human migration patterns have moved from continent to continent around the globe from that point. If the rain stick was developed before human migration started then it's possible it was carried from one place to the next. But the idea is a rather simple idea and there is no reason several ...


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The rain stick is a variation on the rattle, which has been invented by every primitive culture (and continues to be invented by every toddler). Even without documented examples of ten thousand year old rainsticks on separate continents, independent reinvention is plausible enough for a concept as simple as this.


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The public domain scan of the manuscript found by @PiedPiper, IMSLP19389-PMLP01607-Beethoven-Op125mss.pdf, has no extramusical annotations that I could find in the first 50 of its 425 pages. Despite this scan's low resolution, low contrast, and strong noise, it's still clear enough to reveal any textual phrase long enough to refer to a creation myth, or a ...


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There seem to be several sources that confirm your question. Here is an analysis or better a text with information round the 9th symphony The opening of the first movement (Allegro ma non troppo, un poco maestoso) grows out of a void. Against the murmur of the deep strings falling fifths appear in the violins, which develop into a loud and imposing first ...


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"256th notes appear in Vivaldi: Concerto in C for ottavino, archi e cembalo, F. IV n. 5." -- Extremes of conventional music notation. A complete answer would be a histogram of note lengths counted from some corpus such as Yale's, which standardizes on the MIDI quarter note. As with word frequencies in a prose corpus, the histogram would likely have a long ...


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I've been told that civilization began in Africa. That causes me to guess that drums of the sort, like hollow logs and improvised claves, might have been the original instruments. I don't know this for a fact, but I can easily picture music as we know it, starting out as simple rhythmic patterns and native chants used in fertility rites and rain dances. That ...


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As well as the education given to him by his father, Mozart studied counterpoint with Padre Martini in Bologna in 1770. And of course he learnt that not all consecutive fifths are 'bad'.


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I'm afraid I have to take the skeptical view and say that Baroque musicians chose the most suitable symbol for the job, which it turned out the medievals had chosen eight centuries earlier. The quilisma (and other ornamental neumes, such as the oriscus and trigon) are found only in the oldest traditions of neumatic notation for monophonic liturgical chant, ...


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Awesome question! Solfege syllables were derived from a hymn to St. John. The first six lines of the hymn had begun with a different syllable: Ut, Resonare, Mira, Famuli, Solve, Labii, Sancte | ohannes Eventually, the Ut and Si were changed to Do and Ti,and this made: Do, Re, Mi, Fa, Sol, La, Ti, Do The above diatonic notes were theorized upon ...


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