23

"For each one of these chords, you need to choose a scale/mode/arpeggio, think of a melodic idea, and express it within the "shape" that corresponds to this scale." I hate to be the bearer of bad news but this has never been true of any type of improvisation. I think you have a common misconception that Jazz is an analytical pursuit. One in which you use ...


20

The difference is all about what is the tonic and how a tone become perceived as the tonic. In C major C is the tonic. In E Phrygian E is the tonic. Unless you're talking about Gregorian chant (no chords) I think the most practical way of understanding the tonic is through harmony. Let's look at the group of tones D E F and melodically target E... ...at ...


17

How do I understand the mixture of the major and minor blues scales in an applicable way? The short answer is that the mixing of major and minor tonalities is the essence of blues. Many people draw a distinction between "major" and "minor" blues scales, where in C the major blues scale is A C D E♭ E G and the minor blues scale is C E♭ F G♭ G ...


15

First of all, it's important to realize that you've set yourself a very difficult goal. But from what I read in your question, I think you could improve on the way how to approach that goal. As you know, bebop is usually played at fast tempos, and the melodies and improvisations have a tendency to be complex. So bebop standards are usually not a good ...


12

Reading music - safe. Regurgitating others' riffs - safe. Both, when one is good at either (or both) have a certain authenticity to them. 'I play what's written - if it's written, it's probaably good, so that makes my playing sound good'. 'I play just like Clapton did on that track. If it sounded good when he played it, and I play it well, it makes my ...


10

I am not a music teacher, have not been teached by a music teacher and would not consider myself a 'good' guitarist. But I remember having similar problems in terms of improvisation. When I tried to improvise, I felt like I don't know where to go or what to do. The thing which helped me a lot was to focus on call and response. A friend of mine showed me a ...


10

A friend who studied with Bill Charlap (renowed jazz pianist and teacher) once told me that Bill said this: You think while you practice so that you don't have to think while you play. With any new lick or technique, the goal is for our practice to move us through this natural progression: Initially, we plan out how and where to use the lick or idea ...


9

Others here know about actual jazz and have given elaborate answers, but I'll add one perspective. I have no idea about bebop, just pop. First of all, why jump straight in at the deep end, bebop, and with songs where the written chords given to you change rapidly? Take a different approach: start with something very simple, something with simple chords that ...


9

Start out by playing just one note per chord so that you have plenty of mental space to keep track of where you are. Start with playing only the roots, only the thirds, etc., always starting on the downbeat. When you're comfortable with that, continue playing one note per chord, but choose notes that create a smooth line. So for example, you might play the ...


8

There have been similar questions on here already. Yes, it does involve using exactly the same notes, but they're focussed differently. Playing in E Phrygian will involve E F G A B C D, but 'home' will be E. Not the C in C Ionian. Playing in the latter, C will feel like it's the root, or home. E Phrygian may well start on that E note, and return to it ...


8

I spent one year of my life designing a software training course called Improvisation By Degrees (link at the bottom) and answered thousands of support questions via email. From that, as well as from my own personal playing and teaching experience, I'd like to make one suggestion: Students like the one you describe are those who find it most difficult to ...


8

I think the source of your confusion is the notion of "switching" between major and minor, and the resulting question of when to switch. I would suggest to view things differently, i.e., not to think in terms of "switching" between major and minor. If we consider a blues based on dominant chords - so we're not talking about the minor blues here, which doesn'...


7

Guitar is an instrument on which patterns play (literally!) such an important part. Let's take the pentatonics. The popular one, say Am pent. can be played across all six strings, using every 5th fret, and 8, 7, 7, 7, 8 and 8 for the other notes, ascending. A lovely, simple to know pattern. It's probably the first 'solo' set of notes most guitarists learn, ...


6

As per my answer here, I feel that the essence of melodic blues playing is to move beyond the idea of a fixed set of notes, and embrace the fact that in certain parts of the octave, ranges of pitch, rather than only certain fixed pitches, are available. I also think a lot of the writing in educational resources about "major blues" and "minor blues" is ...


5

The modes have different root tones and also different "tenor tones" this means like music in a major key (ionic) has the 5th as dominant all modes have different recitation tones (fifth or sixth). This makes a melody quite different regarding the finalis (final tone) which usually is the root tone and its leading tone. It was Glarean who added to the ...


5

An extension to @JoseDavid's answer, On the subject to rhythm, the structural pattern is more complex in classical music, There are 16 beats(teentaal),7 beats(rupaktaal),12 beats etc (Ektaal) rhythmic cycles in icm, on based of that the raga composition is created and improvised in various tempos i.e Vilambit (very slow), madhya (medium) and drut(fast) and ...


5

Picking up on piiperi Reinstate Monica's comment and looking at the area of motivation - is this a person who wants to compose and improvise their own music? It's definitely healthy (IMO) for a teacher to try to introduce all areas of musical endeavour to a student, but equally, it's probably good to look at what the student's motivations are. Just as the ...


5

The (sort of) generally known major blues scale in key C consists of C, D, E♭,E, G, A, and minor blues scale in key Cm consists of C, E♭, F, G&flat, G, B♭. So, put another way, the notes NOT included are:C♯, G♯ and B! So, if you like, there are three avoid notes involved in blues on C. Given that the other two main chords used ...


5

Making Sense of Blues Soloing; differentiating major/minor pentatonics A. Major: The major blues-melody contains major 3rds but also minor 3rds (and diminished 5ths, minor 7ths: the blue notes, which fit quite well with the tones of the parallel key) The bass and the chords are major chords (the blue notes are chromatic approaches or bent ...


5

Something done with intent is an embellishment; something done by mistake is, well, a mistake. If that mistake leads to creativity (and there are numerous stories around of equipment failures and plain old mistakes leading to extraordinary creativity), it is the act of repeating the mistake that is the creative act. Perhaps ‘embellishment’ should be ...


5

If I understood you correctly, you're trying to play notes from a scale that's always rooted on the root note of whatever chord there is at that moment. And that's why for example if your chords are C - Dm - G - Am, a minor pentatonic scale seems to work nicely on the Am and Dm, but feels a bit funky on the C major and G major chords. If this is what you're ...


5

Not sure how Am over G7 gives G13. And this is maybe the stumbling block. Yes, some triads do fit with others to produce extensions. But what's wrong with just using the originals and adding extensions? A lot of chords are made by the 'stack of thirds' as in G7 - G B D F. Add an A, and we have G9. Add C and it's G11, an E and it's G13 (generally sounds ...


4

The key principle behind the Rule of the Octave is that scale degrees ➀ and ➄ receive what we would call a root position triad -- notated in figured bass by a 5 over a 3 (which I will typeset as 5/3) although these are typically left implied and no figures are are written. Meanwhile, most other notes of the scale generally receive what we would ...


4

Others gave good answers, but I'll try to be more to the point. You must feel the tonic, the home note. If you don't feel the tonic, you can't understand modes. You think mode means scale. Wrong! It's a scale around a tonic. Edit: to demonstrate what the change of home note means, I'll add the same videos I've been using in other "what are modes" questions. ...


4

You do need to learn all chord tones, but you do not necessarily need to memorize them all separately like some magical inexplicable litany of gibberish, because the fretboard is not random and chaotic, there is a clear logic to it. It is similar to basic math, you need to be able to calculate all numbers, 1+3=4, 77+3=80, and 12345+2=12347. But you don't ...


4

Considering your situation, I suspect you're pretty good on theory. So regarding your problem of thinking of "switching" major and minor, I suggest you start thinking more in terms of modes. In historical terms, pretend you're playing baroque or even earlier. We have a perfect example of this in the English folk tradition. Greensleeves switches ...


4

I've found that it's common to switch from the major blues scale on the I to the minor blues scale on the IV, and that happens here; Nicky also uses the bVII chord on the IV I think some of your questions can be addressed as general harmony issues and in many cases those blues harmony characteristics are not hard to understand from a "classical" harmony ...


4

What constitutes a mistake in any area of life is an action that you didn't intend to perform or that produces an effect you didn't intend to produce. Intention is the key here. But that doesn't mean our situation is hopeless just because we're not mind-readers. As far as we listeners know, everything the performer does is possibly a mistake, with ...


4

All the theory out there should serve to improve your "hearing" skills. The reason you succumb to scale shapes, choosing modes, thinking about passing notes etc. is because you can't (yet) hear what you are going to play in your head, before you play it. So you approach it like a computer algorithm and hear the notes you play only after you played them (...


4

Sounds like you invested lots of time in the mechanics (execution of arpeggio, scale, etc) and the theoretical aspect (what to play over a particular chord) but how much time did you spend training your ears? When I am immersed in improv I’m hearing in my head the melody I should play. This has taken me decades of work. Getting very serious about ear ...


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