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4

Try developing a sense for phrase length rather than just counting the beat. Try breaking things down to 2 bar phrases with attention to how you "cross the barline." Place the continuous rhythmic flow over the bar line, like these patterns... Try simple broken chord and scale lines and count out loud. The point isn't to play fast, complex lines. ...


2

This might sound simplistic, but what works for me is to deliberately favor listening over playing. When I feel myself struggling to keep track of place, I concentrate more on hearing the other players and the totality of the music than on what I’m doing. If I miss some beats, no big deal; better to miss a few possibilities than to play a misplaced note. ...


1

I think you just have to internalise the beat. But I share your propensity to getting lost in the chord sequence. I find having the music copy, or at least a chord chart, in front of me helps a lot. And don't be afraid to play a couple of choruses keeping close to the original melody. (I DO hope there was one? These 'chords only' songs are so boring......


2

Improvising over a 12 bar blues has been covered - and basically needs you to know what the format is, so learning the sequence and being able to play simple one chord/note per bar initially works well, moving on only when you are sure of where you are. And on that note, it's absolutely essential that any muso knows where ONE is, and what to play over it. ...


3

I think Aaron's answer covers what you need but what I do when I improvise is I actually sing either the chord progression or a bass line in my head when I'm playing rhythm and then when it's time to solo, the chord progression or bass line continues to play in my head when I solo. I also improvise in 4 bar or 8 bar sections and I've done this for so long ...


3

The 12 bar blues is a good practice. It seems that you haven’t fully internalized the schema and the bass line: Imagine the 3 lines and 4 bars per line. Also be aware of the degree pattern. Play first a bass line, sing the line with note names of the triad do mi so Write the lyrics of any blues, or invent your own text, sing along the words to the bass line ...


9

Start out by playing just one note per chord so that you have plenty of mental space to keep track of where you are. Start with playing only the roots, only the thirds, etc., always starting on the downbeat. When you're comfortable with that, continue playing one note per chord, but choose notes that create a smooth line. So for example, you might play the ...


1

I suspect that this question might not met the standards of stack exchange in that it would be opinion based. That being said, I looked back at my reading diary (http://don.dream-in-color.net/books/archive.php4?iSubject=83 ) to see what I'd read and thought about books on counterpoint. I started with Counterpoint: The Polyphonic Style of the Sixteenth ...


1

I have been where you are. Many years ago. The mental challenge was one of the reasons I wanted to start playing jazz. And the single advice I'd give you is: "transcribe solos". If you do that, you'll see very effective ways to cope with chords, and you'll also make the phrases "your own", because you have heard them, you have transcribed ...


-2

It's the same 12 notes, with many many of the same principles. "genres" don't actually exist, they were invented as a quick way to distinguish things. Debussy, Ravelle, Mahler use "jazz" harmonies all over the place, before the genre of jazz even existed. There is no clear threshold as to when one genre begins or another ends. You're ...


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