Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now

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2

Along the same lines of what @Tim has said: These boxes are transposable--but in order to use them in other keys, it's extremely helpful to know where your root note is in all boxes. Sure, you may not know all of the notes you're playing, but if you're struggling to play in a certain key, you need to be able to construct your boxes around the root note on ...


1

On the assumption you're not including open strings anywhere, 'boxes' work fine on guitar. Basically, knowing the highest and lowest positions for a key in a box, you have a minimum of two octaves - plenty to be going on with. Take a riff or tune in a key you're familiar with, say A major. Play it through, then consider that if you played it in B♭, all ...


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I have found this differentiation: Choralbuch Style (homophonic) and Choralgesang Style. This shows that embellished or varied - like Michael Curtis has proposed - would explain it fine. Actually I’d prefer the term figured bass, descant or chorale, if it figured was’t occupied (erroneously?) by thorough bass.


3

The generic English term variation can be used. It would include variations where figuration is applied to both the melody and the bass. Just to confirm what we are talking about with music examples, Mozart K 265: http://imslp.eu/files/imglnks/euimg/9/96/IMSLP188992-PMLP55775-Mozart,_Wofgang_Amadeus-NMA_09_26_06_KV_265_scan.pdf Theme in mostly simple ...


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Note that the altered scale is just one out of many scale choices over a V7#9 chord. If you think that the chord implies the altered scale, then you imply an altered 5 in the chord. If the actual voicing really has a natural 5 (and note that most of the time the 5 is either omitted or indeed altered), then the altered scale is not the appropriate chord scale....


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You don't HAVE to play the ♯5. Yes, it clashes with the ♮5 in the basic chord. Just like the ♭10 (even if we do insist in calling it a ♯9) clashes with the ♮3. And the ♮5 is a very neutral, harmonically inactive note. It's generally the first note to be omitted when voicings get too full and muddy.


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The key principle behind the Rule of the Octave is that scale degrees ➀ and ➄ receive what we would call a root position triad -- notated in figured bass by a 5 over a 3 (which I will typeset as 5/3) although these are typically left implied and no figures are are written. Meanwhile, most other notes of the scale generally receive what we would ...


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