16

Every note has a pitch, determined by the fundamental frequency of the sound wave that produces it. When you have two different notes, you have two different pitches, caused by two different frequencies. The distance between those pitches is called an interval, and corresponds to the ratio of the note's frequencies. For example, if one note is an octave ...


12

In Indian Classical music we usually don't have a chord system. There is usually a drone (mono chord) playing in the background through a stringed instrument assisted by the tabla,harmonium, flute etc in the foreground. Music is based on a Raga and various forms which are played over the drone in the background. Majorly two drones are used : 1) सा (C) , प ...


10

I am going to preface my answer by saying that I know very, very little about North Indian Classical music. However, from your descriptions, I believe that there are parallel techniques used in Western music that may help you define tonic. Essentially, it appears that you're asking how to define tonic when the harmony / melody is not functioning in the way ...


9

I think the "non-constructible set" concept is actually more confusing than descriptions of what a raga is. As far as I can tell, a raga is a whole group of musical concepts put together to form a framework from which an entire work of music can be created. It is more than just a key signature or scale, although all ragas seem to have at least one scale in ...


8

I'll try to be specific and use terms in carnatic music to describe each aspect Each Raaga provides key phrases which are set forth by the notes which are allowed in the raaga. Aarohanam: notes(swaram) that can be played ascending Avarohanam: notes that can be played descending. A list of scales which are common is provided here along with audio: http:...


8

For much of Jazz, the harmonic changes provide a key forward push. Melodic choices have to work within that framework. In Indian music, there are no harmonic changes to exploit for forward motion or melodic development. With some "smooth jazz" and some modal jazz, the tunes stay in a single key or mode, and there is more similarity to Indian music, but even ...


7

To a first approximation, there are only ragas; you don't have to care about raginis. If you really want to know what raginis are, then (in the sense that you are most likely to encounter the term) primarily they are (female) personifications [as counterparts] of certain ragas, used in artistic (i.e. in paintings) depictions. If you really want to consider ...


7

I didn't know about it but I've recently seen this syllables when I was looking up Kodaly. I think Sa Re Ga Ma Pa Dha Ni Sa is not corresponding to the C D E F G but to the moveale Do Re Mi. yes it is: These seven swaras are shortened to Sa, Ri (Carnatic) or Re (Hindustani), Ga, Ma, Pa, Dha, and Ni. Collectively these notes are known as the sargam (the ...


6

In case I am not too late, here is a great theoretical paper on the exact topic. http://www.academia.edu/2835618/A_Multipitch_Approach_to_Tonic_Identification_in_Indian_Classical_Music I have a smallish program that implements section 2.3 of the paper as a Java program. Sections 2.1 and 2.2 are provided by the author as a Vamp plugin and can be used with ...


6

In general, scales tend to have about seven notes in them, or "seven, plus/minus two". This number is believed to have to do with cognitive limitations; it would be difficult to recall more notes. On the other hand, scales with fewer notes impose more melodic and harmonic limitations. In order to answer whether or not it is a coincidence that Indian and ...


6

The description of a rāga as a “non-constructible set in music” is essentially useless, because if you follow the source that is referred to on Wikipedia, and its citations for the phrase “non-constructible set”, you arrive at things like these (1, 2, 3, 4) from which, after unpacking a fair bit, it turns out to just mean roughly “something hard to define”. ...


6

There are some chords, but they're used in a bit of a different way than the Western classical tradition. It's a stylistic feature of these two genres owing to their origins in the late Medieval and early Renaissance eras. They both highlight the raga (basically a melodic pattern) and tala (a rhythmic pattern), just like the respective color and talea of ...


6

A lot of my answer will be gross simplification and please take it with a grain of salt. There are notable counterexamples here. So the closest thing to harmonization in a raga is a concept called melharmony. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melharmony An extremely simple example of melharmony (and this is a really special case), you could just play thirds ...


5

An extension to @JoseDavid's answer, On the subject to rhythm, the structural pattern is more complex in classical music, There are 16 beats(teentaal),7 beats(rupaktaal),12 beats etc (Ektaal) rhythmic cycles in icm, on based of that the raga composition is created and improvised in various tempos i.e Vilambit (very slow), madhya (medium) and drut(fast) and ...


5

Western classical and Indian classical violin are very, very different styles. The main similarity is that they use the same instrument, so if you learned one style, you would have a head start learning the other. Similarities: For either style, you will need to be familiar with your instrument and learn where to find notes, and how to control the bow. ...


5

I learn Indian classical violin and here are basic differences in learning Indian and western style violin, apart from bowing and holding the violin Tuning: Western violin is tuned differently than Indian violin. That means that if you play the same positions it sounds differently. It would require a lot of practice to get a mental framework of how an ...


5

I will answer the question in the title, Stinkfoot is right, for other questions (why is this the most common beginning raga taught), it is better to ask them separately. The name we give to the western scale that uses the same notes as the Raga Mayamalavagowla is the double harmonic scale. In C, it looks like this: Obviously, a raga is about more than ...


5

My uneducated guess is that they each filled a void in the instrumentation available to musicians at the time when European influence was becoming stronger in India. The harmonium is inexpensive, easy to build and repair with hand tools and easy to transport. For bhajans and qawwalis an even tempered scale is fine, so the harmonium is a good choice for a ...


5

One plays the tanpura in the background to help fix the pitch of your playing. Since you have a flute that is set to the A-scale, set the tanpura to the pitch A. Set the first string to Pa. The reason for choosing Sa and Pa to be played on the tanpura is that these notes are "fixed" in all ragas, so having a constant drone playing these notes in the ...


5

I can hear the extra sa ni in the example he plays, but he makes it sound more like an ornament. When he sings the example the notes sound much more deliberate. In my experience when musicians are both playing and talking in a video it's much better to orientate yourself to what they are playing rather than what they are saying (or singing).


4

Key and tonic are highly contextual in all music, so if a melody line is all one has to go on and that line is ambiguous in what it implies (it does not contain enough information to narrow down all possibilities to one answer), it may not always be possible to arrive at one answer with a high degree of certainty without additional information. Of course, ...


4

In classical music, there is a rare practice called Murchana or graha bheda or shruti bheda, which changes the tonic, but all the notes of the base raga remain the same. As a result the raga sounds different. In light music, the tonic key may change, but the raga remains the same. In the second category, the chords will change, try this out:


4

In Indian classical music, every Raag's Aroh and Avroh (ascending and Descending) must not contain less than five or more than 7 notes. This rule defines the Jati of a Raag. There are three main Jaties (Categories) of Indian Raags: Heptatonic or Sampooran or all seven notes Hexatonic or Chhadav or 6 notes Pentatonic or Audav or 5 notes However songs do not ...


4

This scale is refered to by many names, but the preferred term is double harmonic major. It is the near neighbor of a lot of commonly-used scales, like the phrygian dominant mode (of the harmonic minor scale), the h-w diminished scale, and the altered scale. Unlike those scales, the double harmonic major has the b2, the nat5, and the nat7, making it ...


4

I am from south India and recently wanted to learn Bhansuri flute so I ordered one online .But later just like you i found out there are two types of bamboo flute. 1. Bhansuri 2. Venu/murali There are two kinds of classical music in India 1. Hindustani music 2. Carnatic music So Bhansuri is used in Hindustani classical music ( north Indian) which consist of ...


4

The notes in blue are to be played in the madhya sthāyi (middle octave), the notes in red in the mandara sthāyi (lower octave) and the notes in pink in the tāra sthāyi (upper octave). I might add that it is not the standard practice to colour code the notation to indicate the octave. In Carnatic (south Indian classical) music, a dot above the note signifies ...


4

Correct. The pressure for reaching the pa, dha, ni and sa of higher octave is much higher and the finger positions will be slightly different. Of course these are for advanced practice. Nevertheless you can also try


4

In Indian classical the tanpura never changes (or should not). A teacher of mine reminded me: How utterly opposite are the words tanpura and it's supposed translation : drone Drone signifies boredom, monotony Tan-pura literally means infinite fullness of sound The first string depends on rag but is usually the fifth


4

If your teacher asked you to do it, then the benefit of this practising outweighs any risk of acclimatizing to equal temperament, especially if you also do some practice away from equal temperament. Even within the European tradition, unaccompanied choirs and string quartets have no difficulty producing chords and melodies untampered by equal temperament, ...


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