13

Short answer: no. As a non-drying vegetable oil, it will eventually become rancid and not be fun. Same as safflower, peanut, sunflower, coconut, palm, etc. A better choice is a "drying oil" such as linseed oil, walnut oil, or a non-organic mineral oil or tung oil. Some folks have had good results using a citrus oil (orange, lemon) to clean, and then an ...


10

For your first question. Your cymbal is oxidized, and the green color is called patina Initially, bare Cu metal atoms react with air to form the pink oxide, cuprite, Cu2O, which has Cu+1 cations. This gradually oxidizes further to the black oxide, tenorite, CuO, with Cu+2 ions. The black sulfide CuS also sometimes forms. In the presence of moisture, ...


6

I think it depends if you want to have it as an "active instrument" and play with it, or just keep it as a nice harmonica for memory/collection. I play in one of my projects with Filip Jers. He was sponsored by Hering harmonicas and now Suzuki harmonicas, and he tunes his harmonicas every other show. To clean his harmonicas he opens it, cleans the reeds, ...


6

The difference really is noticeable to an experienced player. Depending on the experience level and even genre of music played, the effects may be noticed after only a few months of not cleaning, or after two years. It all depends. If an high school player is playing mostly the low rumbly notes of a concert band piece, they may not notice much affect at all, ...


6

I'd shy away from anything not prescribed. One can use olive or linen oil to great effect on untreated wooden tables or breakfast plates: it gets sucked up in unbelievable amounts and then partly cracks and thickens, preserving the wood and making it impervious to stains. However, olive oil is acidic which would be bad news for frets and strings. And most ...


6

This cymbal is an alloy of copper and tin. The green coulor is the a phenomene of the oxidation of copper. It can be cleaned and will disappear by a chemical reduction with hydrogenium. https://wikivisually.com/wiki/Cymbal_alloys the link of wiki says: Cymbal alloys From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia [wikipedia page] Cymbals are made from four main ...


5

Olive oil, or any other vegetable-based oil, is not recommended for oiling any wood as it may go bad, or rancid, after a while. Most commercially available fretboard oils use mineral oil as their main ingredient. Mineral oil is inexpensive, will not go bad, and is readily available at most pharmacies. So if you want a cheap and virtually identical ...


5

It's best to just wipe down your fret board with a damp clean cotton cloth. This is what Martin Guitars recommends for cleaning the fret boards of their acoustic guitars and it does work.


4

If the goal is to remove the rosin residue on your strings, you can remove it with a soft dry cloth, without any other product. Put the cloth on the string, one at a time, then by snapping two fingers together firmly go back and forth across the length of the string. This sould produce a somewhat high shriek from the strings and will put them out of tune. ...


4

For a rotary-valve tuba, the process is slightly different because the rotary valves cannot be removed from their housings (unlike piston valves). However, the basic idea is the same: Draw a lukewarm bath of water into the tub. Add a mild hand soap to aid cleaning; DO NOT use dish detergent (you'll never get it back out of the rotaries no matter how much ...


4

This is for a piston-valve tuba, by the way, not a rotary valve. Also keep in mind to do this all very gently, tubas scratch easily. You'll want to take it completely apart (valves out too, and remember how it goes together) and set in a bath tub full of warm/hot water. Then, add some soap (mild, non-abrasive) and rub it gently with a cloth to get off grime ...


4

I would not want to put coconut oil on any of my fretboards (or any other part of my guitar). Coconut oil is great stuff with many beneficial uses. Guitar maintenance is not one of them. One unique property of coconut oil is that it tends to begin to solidify at the temperatures that are most optimal for guitar storage. Lemon oil is a recommended ...


4

I personally would never recommend this. It might be OK for a typical mass produced modern instrument with a thick poly finish, but even then I don't think I would want it finding its way through minor finish cracks and getting into the timber. More seriously I'm sure it would be bad for a higher end shellac/French polished classical. (Most of us don't ...


4

Obviously a grand piano, with sostenuto in the middle. Since the damper pedal is the most used on just about every piano (practice pedal on some gets used a lot but will be locked down), it appears that this damper pedal is a replacement for the original, which may have been damaged in transit rather than 'worn out'. It's not, unfortunately, a good match ...


3

If the harmonica had a plastic comb, you could simply soak the whole thing in lemon juice overnight. Old harmonicas which have pins or rivets typically have pear-wood combs however, and soaking them is not advisable. Rivets and pins are essentially the same thing. Rivets are hollow-tube pins. A two-part hollow tube would definitely be called a rivet, but ...


3

Body & string posts... Microfibre cloths*, one wetted then squeezed as dry as you can get it, the other completely dry. Wipe over with the damp one, then dry with the dry. Repeat gently rather than scrub. If that isn't completely effective [it should be with patience rather than elbow grease] then add a squirt of clear window cleaner to the wet cloth. ...


3

A comprehensive list may be difficult for my tired brain, but here's a start. Daily/Weekly: Tune the instrument. At least test it every time you take it out. Don't defile yourself and others by playing an out-of-tune violin! Rosin the bow by rubbing your rosin cake up and down the length of the bow several times, and the gently wiping the excess rosin off ...


3

Cleaning it everyday after using it is the most important step to keeping a flute clean. All you have to do is wipe down the inside and outside with a cloth to remove moisture. Remember that the moisture there is your spit/sweat and it certainly isn't distilled water, so any that dries will leave a residue. The more that dries there the thicker, more ...


3

Yes oxidation, and all the scientific stuff everyone was mentioning. I have seen sweat, spit, and assortments of alcoholic beverages turn cymbals into this color. Essentially moisture and air as I believe a few have said. To clean it all you need is some Brasso (or comparable metal polish), a cloth, and some elbow grease. Take your time, work in sections ...


2

Overall, the residue will affect the sound if it's large enough to change the shape of a tube. If you have a lot of dirt or "stuff" inside it can affect the tube size or change the direction of the sound waves, and so change the tone and pitch. It is probably more important to keep the valves clean and oiled so they don't wear and leak around the edges (and ...


2

Some plastic recorders have separate blocks but most of those are glued in so removing them is not really possible. Warm/hot dishwater in the sink will do the trick. Later, a piece of card stock cut appropriately can be used to dislodge particles of food or lint that get caught in windway afterwards, or just wash it again. A clean pipe cleaner will work also,...


2

Yes. When cleaning the tuba (in the sense of a full cleaning of the instrument), you should also take out the springs in order to clean properly. This is for more easily cleaning both the springs and also the bottom interior of the housing.


2

If your tailpiece is loose my advice is: go to a luthier. Because in this case is important to check if the sound-pole is in its place, as it can move away or fall and endanger the violin. Since you have to do that ask there for a cleaning product. Violins have a special polish that is most often made/produced by the luthier himself. On your own I would ...


2

I trialled all three methods. Both the coke and vinegar solution took some of the tarnish off over about 8 hours, but neither did the entire job. (The coke was more effective, but perhaps using straight vinegar, rather than a solution may help.) The bicarbonate of soda was the most effective method. An hour or two of soaking took a lot of tarnish off, ...


2

Using vegetable oils such as coconut oil is generally not recommended (see below). Also, it seems unlikely that the fretboard is actually dry. Are you sure it is not simply very dirty? In any way, a good scrubbing with an old toothbrush or even very fine steel wool is recommended before oiling the surface, since the oil doesn't actually do a good job of ...


2

Take your favorite mug fill with about two thirds tepid water from the kettle and about one third vinegar - place your harp in the solution for twenty to thirty minutes - rinse thoroughly with clean tepid water - tap out both sides onto the palm of your hand - your harp will look and sound bright! Don't use oil; it attracts dirt, dust and fluff.


2

Wood can actually dry out, contrary to some other statements posted above. The natural oils that the wood naturally contains tend to evaporate over time. This may result in (tiny) cracks (but this doesn't happen often, especially with glued on fretboards). And it will become less flexible. (And more prone to breakage when falling (especially with an angled ...


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