37

replete's answer is correct that the original reason was to have a bigger range, as needed for some organ music. However, I don't think that's the reason those Imperial models are so sought-for over all these years – actually playing the lowest notest is scarcely musically useful. The reason why people want Bösendorfer Imperial is that they sound awesome, ...


32

Both instruments (as well as all single- and double-reeded instruments and all brass instruments) behave as tubes closed at one end. The difference is that saxophone (and all other reeds) are conical, whereas the clarinet is cylindrical. For a conical tube closed at one end, the fundamental wavelength is twice the length of the tube (Actually, it's a bit ...


19

Early pianos started out with the existing range of harpsichords, having between four and five octaves, usually starting at low C. This stands to reason, because Bartolomeo Cristofori, generally credited with being the inventor of the piano, was an expert harpsichord maker. By the time of Mozart, the range had standardized to five octaves, starting with ...


12

First of all, let's get this fact out of the way: 24 pitches in an octave is a rather simplistic notational convention. It doesn't reflect the actual state of affairs at all. Actual number of notes can be much higher. One practitioner, for instance, claims to have identified at least 12 notes between his lowest e-flat and his highest e-natural. Anyone who ...


11

First question: there is no rule, no "max limit" between notes. Sometimes you'll have to figure out yourself the way you spread the notes between your two hands (try the Bach chorales... you're a conductor with four voices, the relative heights of the notes are written relative to the singer's tessitura, not the keyboard player's hands). You'll also face ...


9

There is this nice chart on Wikipedia that show the range of many instruments, probably more than a composer would typically use to compose music. Harps, Pianos, Bassoons, Contra-alto Clarinets, Tenor Wagner Tubas, Bass Trombones, Baritone Horns and Euphoniums are example of those that you need. By the way, some musical notation programs like Sibelius ...


9

I would say that those ranges are a good guideline. Of course, their range upwards is theoretically infinite (or at least until you run out of fingerboard, for fingered notes), but it's somewhere around there that they start getting screechy and it takes a professional quality section to play in tune. You can expand those ranges a bit for soloists (...


8

Look at this video, particularly from 1'35" You finger from the left (player's view). The 'clips' are on the right. They don't obstruct fingering.


8

Transposing orchestral pieces mostly produces unsatisfactory results, but it's often done, particularly to accommodate singers. If you transpose up too much the result often sounds thin, and if you transpose down too much the sound can get very muddy. A major third is normally about the maximum you can get away with. Most orchestral instruments don't have ...


7

When the piano was invented it did not have 88 keys and did not start on A. As composers such as Beethoven starting composing music that demanded a wider range of available notes, piano makers of the day responded by building piano's with an expanded range. The precursor of the piano was the harpsichord which was not the first keyboard (the organ was ...


7

Yep. There's of course another reason than cannot be underestimated: bling.


7

Full audible spectrum is 20Hz - 20kHz. Having said that, if you don't want to or can't stretch to 20kHz, the lowest I would recommend going is to 8kHz. I think the main question here is: what is the purpose of the analyzer? Also, depending on the application, consider asking in Signal Processing; you could probably get better answers there. Hope this helps!


6

It is easy to play A5 (or, indeed, even A6) on cello as a natural flageolett. However (even if the airy sound of a flageolett is ok for your application), it won't help with any tones merely close to A5. So if that's just the very tip of a melodic line, you'll need to think of a position where also the other notes are feasible as non-flageoletts. The 11th ...


6

Interesting question; I didn't realize my own confusion until you pointed it out. According to The Harvard Dictionary of Music: Ambitus. The range of pitches employed in a melody or voice. Range. The span of pitches between highest and lowest of an instrument, voice, or part; also compass. See also Tessitura. Register. A specific segment of the total range ...


6

One option is to re-orchestrate the work; we also call this "arranging." By changing around the instrumentation, you can move the various lines to other instruments that might have different range characteristics. Just be careful that this re-orchestration doesn't ruin the balance of the work: often inexperienced musicians will re-orchestrate something such ...


5

A "proper" Bayan runs in its core right hand keyboard from E2 to G7. Using registers with the bass reed would give you E1 to G6. Range in the left hand is E1 to C#6 I think. The lefthand side of most converter accordions actually runs from E1 to C#6. For the right side to have similar range, you need to use a chromatic button accordion however: piano ...


5

TL;DR version: Will low C be as hard as Bb to play even though it is not a pedal tone? Nope, harder Are pedal tones easier to play on large bore? Kind of, but not to an important degree Can you get luscious pedal tones down to E1 (no trigger) with a large bore tenor, or do you need a bass? Depends on your definition of luscious, but listen to Joe ...


5

I'd say Luke's (and user10944's) answer of an octave sounds about right for vocal parts. While typical SATB vocal ranges for your standard 4-part harmony are usually listed as about an octave and a half each, many simple melodies stay within about an octave. Depending on the melodic contour, that octave may stretch from dominant to dominant (as in Amazing ...


5

Here are two extensive resources for instrumental ranges both from Dolmetsch Organisation: Musical Instrument Ranges and Names (With Diagrams, like the following image) Chart of Sounding Range and Clefs Used (mainly descriptive information) These resources compiled from Norman Del Mar's Anatomy of the Orchestra; Gardner Read's Thesaurus of Orchestral ...


5

There is one important way how the small and big instruments differ, with regard to this issue: on cello and double bass, there are two very different fingering techniques used, namely, the positions above 5th are normally played as thumb position. Thumb position gives a very stable basis to notes almost arbitrarily high on the fretboard, which is why some ...


5

As a general rule, I've always found the trigger Eb to be a little easier than regular F and E. But then again, I have a relatively large bore trombone. Is it possible there's something wrong with your F attachment? Does it sound perfectly fine on higher notes? It might be helpful to play higher notes and scales using entirely (or mostly) the trigger in ...


5

There are a few, but as you might have guessed, they are not terribly common. The alto trombone is pitched a perfect fourth higher than a tenor trombone. The range is usually considered to go from A2 to B♭5. Its primary use, as far as I'm aware, is in classical music from the late Classical & early Romantic era. The tenor horn (so named in British ...


4

It's 4 octaves + C: CDEFGAB CDEFGAB CDEFGAB CDEFGAB CDEFGAB C. You count 4 octaves from the starting note and add the starting note again: C1-C2 (first octave), C2-C3 (second), C3-C4(third), C4-C5(fourth), C5-C6(fifth), as above. The first example you provided: CDEFGAB CDEFGAB CDEFGAB CDEFGAB CDEFGAB is 5 octaves minus a minor second. The second example: ...


4

There are lots of things you could do. I'll mention a few here (see bottom of my answer) but you should talk to a teacher or a live trombone player for more specific exercises for you. The big important thing for you (and other people) to realize is that range works two ways: if you want to play high, you have to learn how to play low. You must increase ...


4

Most professional flutists nowadays have a flute with a B-foot, and have no trouble playing low B- although not fortissimo, so it shouldn't really be a problem.


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