21

I would recommend consulting the source where you found this. If it was a publishing company, they may have their own system of shorthand that will clarify this. Otherwise, this all seems relatively standard: 3*3*3*3* indicates the wind grouping with three performers each: three flutes, three oboes, three clarinets, three bassoons. The asterisks indicate ...


20

Sounds like you are trying to intellectually and analytically "understand" music. In my opinion, this can be done to some extent. Just like you can intellectually understand language and grammar, and use that understanding to write poems, novels and short stories. However useful it might be, it isn't really necessary to write great stories. What makes a ...


20

Great question! I just happen to have the Prelude on my desk at the moment - you've got a really interesting project on your hands there, but quite a lot of work - good luck! Hopefully I can add to jjmusicnotes really useful advice with some ideas that will make this a far simpler project for you. Firstly, from your question, it seems like you are "half-...


9

Unfortunately, the answer to your question is one that you can only ultimately provide. Orchestration is an art form unto itself, and your choices are personal and unique to your sense of nuance and knowledge of the music. For example, a particular melody or line given to a cornet will sound differently if given to the flugelhorn instead; though the same ...


8

Why can some "just learn" music without learning theory well, etc.? Because learning theory is not necessary. Consider singing, or child prodigies, it's a fallacy that you can become an expert in anything before you even start practising it. I feel that anybody that starts anything with theory, is doing it the hard way. Start by trying. Studying theory at ...


8

Music theory is not music, it is a way of classifying and describing music. It is "metadata". Being conversant in the metadata is not a prerequisite for being a musician. That said, someone who plays music well certainly understands music theory on some level, perhaps intuitively. They may not use the same terminology as you to describe what they are doing ...


7

Both are extremely common in orchestral music, and any professional musician (or even a serious college student or hobbyist) who plays classical music should have them. And even if they don't, they should be adept at transposing. I wouldn't classify the higher pitched trumpets as "harsher", but rather "brighter". The C trumpet is noticeably brighter than ...


6

Definitely don't throw in the towel. Everyone is different. Some amazing musicians have no grasp of theory at all, but over time they learn what sounds work and what sounds don't. For most of the music I play, theory is unnecessary - but it helps once you have some physical capability. So I could, for example, play basic rock chords in a 4/4 rhythm and it ...


6

It's a baroque trumpet, basically a historical version of a trumpet without valves. Probably they hold it like that because that was the way it was held at that time (think of musicians on a tower, announcing the arrival of the king or stuff like that...)


5

Db Piccolo Db Piccolo's first came about when bands began to be dominated by early brass instruments, and repertoires were adjusted to suitable keys for brass instruments - which created awkward fingerings for the old, simple system, C piccolos. (The simple system limited the keys the instrument could easily play in.) By creating the Db piccolo, piccolo ...


5

You last question is a non-sequetur. The question of whether or not you do something has nothing to do with how easy it is for others to do. The question before you is whether you want to put in the time and effort to bring yourself to the level you want to be at. I have seen people with great natural talents squander them because they didn't care to ...


5

There are a few issues here. Let's start with notation: Many instruments are written in concert pitch. This means that, if you write a C, that instrument will play a C. The (standard) flute and timpani are concert-pitch instruments. Other instruments are pitched in a particular key; hence a B-flat Clarinet and B-flat trumpet, if playing a written C, will ...


4

I suppose with a cornet you'll have the ability to add something extra in for texture, so something like finding the main melody line in the song, whether it be with guitar or vocals have the trumpet follow this line to emphasise the line and it could offer a massive difference to the sound and feel of the song depending, you should try looking at reel big ...


4

Here is my feeble attempt at combining the individual instruments Register tone quality into one chart. Note: Samuel Adler's Orchestration book did not have any of this for the Strings but that is not what I was looking for so I am satisfied. Also, I had a hard time getting everything in the image, so some instruments are placed rather randomly...


4

Lots of people have natural aptitude to something - be it swimming, painting, playing football... Those lucky enough to have it in music will be able to just play.Maybe not brilliantly at the start, but progress is usually good, Getting to know the instrument is paramount.Theory not so. More later. With a complete beginner, I get them used to the ...


3

Even though almost every brass player living hates mutes (including me), use them extensively. They are invaluable for managing timbre changes. Just remember it takes a few beats to get the mute in and remove it.If you want an oboe-ish tone, a cornet in harmon (stem-in) or a metal straight gives a reasonable substitute. (Holst used this trick with a ...


3

Your playing abilities are currently basic. Music theory is about as helpful to you as a thorough knowledge of some language's grammar is to somebody who knows about 100 words in that language. How can any kid talk better in that language without even a clue of the underlying grammar? The point is that a grammar is something that emerged along with the ...


3

Normally questions concerning material solicitation are shut down, but I think in this case, since it applies to orchestration, which is musical practice related to composition pedagogy, it is pertinent to this forum. First, there are two great texts concerning orchestration: Alfred Blatter's "Orchestration" and Samuel Adler's "The Study of Orchestration." ...


3

Most full scores have pieces have the instruments listed in front of their staves at the beginning of each movement. For example, the score that's posted to IMSLP for the canata you mention lists for the first movement: Flauti, Oboi, Clarinetti, Fagotti, Corni, Violino I, Violino II, Viola, Coro, Violoncello e Basso which translates as Flutes, Oboes,...


3

Non instrument-specific music was standard in the era of Renaissance for several reasons: The number of instruments was far bigger (think of bagpipes, shawms, Gemshorn, hurdy-gurdy, some of these even being built in families) so the chance of a match was smaller. Printing of scores only got wider use in late 15th/early 16th century and manual copies were ...


2

I think the answers so far spend too few consideration on the fact that we're talking here about a single trumpet added to a standard rock ensemble. Sure, there is lots of pop/rock music with brass and wind, but that is actually quite different from only having a single trumpet. Typically, a single wind or brass instrument would only be truly capable of ...


2

Excellent question. It's because these people learn to play by ear, they learn how to use music as a language of its own, and usually this learning process is done by listening, imitating, noodling and experimenting. Doing that enough will get you to a high degree of proficiency without needing music theory. There's also probably an element of having a "...


2

I suspect the answer may lay in the way you go about learning to play. Notice I didn't say "learning music". I think the term "play an instrument" is absolutely appropriate, because it is literally play : creation, imagination, "what if" scenarios, no limit on what you can do. You can play any note you like, however you like. No right and wrong. If you ...


2

Yes, both are common, and are the predominant instruments in modern American orchestras. For clarinets, the most commonly used are A, Bb, and Eb; for trumpets, C, Bb, D/Eb, and A/Bb (piccolo). (In other parts of the world, mainly Great Britain and Russia, the Bb trumpet is most widely used.) In the US, by far, the A clarinets and C trumpets are most common. ...


2

I can only comment the clarinet part of the question: clarinets in A are common and even amateurs have A and Bb instruments (the Eb clarinet is a different story). It has nothing to do with the size of the orchestra. The part may state clarinet in A and as player of a transposing instrument this leaves you with the choices: use the required instrument ...


2

Modern R&B I don't listen to much R&B but that could be an advantage: Having listened to the examples you give (some links to specific examples would help further, if you can provide some?), this is what I'm hearing: Bass synth, often fairly strong in the mix Very little in the midrange like guitars or middle-keys synth, leaving loads of room in ...


2

I have previously referred to this as "The holy grail of the misinformed". It cannot be done. You cannot un-bake a cake. You may have some small success at removing/isolating anything in the centre by phase-reversing the two sides... but then, of course, you have the sides out of phase, which is to say the least, uncomfortable to listen to. Pay the money ...


2

This bell sound is made by tubular bells, also known as concert or orchestral chimes.


1

I will make the suggestion that your problem here is not the instrumentation, but the low skill level of the instrumentalists. Arranging for low-level band is a complete art and specialization in and of itself. Unless every one of your players is a prodigy, there is likely to be a very limited set of rhythms, and even notes that you will be able write for ...


1

Nice to hear of someone arranging for Brass Band. As a young teenager (50 years ago), brass bands introduced me to classical music. These days I play recorder in an early music consort, but that's another story. My thoughts are: Violin 1, 2 and viola map roughly to solo, 2nd & 3rd cornet (and possibly tenor horn). This is necessary as they are the main ...


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