New answers tagged

1

I think this is unanswerable, because there's no way to quantify appreciation. I suspect the authors of the other answers have valid points when they point out that translations crippled by the requirements of scansion will often not be as good as the original text, but I'm fairly sure that there are exceptions. Scansion notwithstanding, some non-English ...


5

To add to some already good answers, one reason it can be so worthwhile to know the original language is to fully appreciate the text–music relationships that the composer set. There's a technique known as text painting (or word painting) where a composer makes a musical reference to the text being sung. Perhaps there's a chilly wind that passes the ...


4

The trend is clearly against translating. While operas were frequently translated into the local language still in the 20th century, this sharply declined with any historically informed performance. Schuberts melodies have easily an impact on the interested listener (no matter, how hard they are to play or to sing). The poems he chose were of widely varying ...


10

Any vocal work can only be fully appreciated by listening to it in the original language, whether that language is German (Schubert's "Winterreise", or any Wagner or Strauss opera) or Italian (Puccini, Verdi etc.), because a translation nearly always loses some of the detail of the original. In extreme cases the whole meaning can be lost, ...


3

There’s some compendiums, like the Cambridge Companion to Violin or String Quartet. But you’ll find more material (books, multimedia and scientific papers) focusing your search in narrower periods, like Early music, French baroque, Romantic period et cetera, or even search by composers. For example, there’s a great book by Robin Stowell, “The Early Violin ...


Top 50 recent answers are included