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44

It's because in music, when you're talking about intervals, you count the first note, all notes in between, as well as the final note. For example, if you play two notes that are right next to each other, the interval is a second - even though the second note is just "one note" away from the first. In fact, if you play the same note at the same time, it's ...


42

In classical theory, the necessity or lack thereof of a particular chord member is generally determined by the note's tendency to lead to another note. That tendency comes most often from the interval of an augmented fourth or diminished fifth. Enharmonically, those intervals are the same, but in context, they are not, and they resolve differently. In a "...


41

The reason there are multiple names for notes is that the same note may function differently in different contexts. If you just play a single note with no context, then it could have a multitude of different names. For example if you played the note in between F and G you could call it F# or Gb or more obscurely E## or Abbb. They are all valid names and are ...


38

You're correct; it should be called a fourth! But since "augmented fourth" won't be big enough for this, we kind of had to make up a term, and the world of music theory collectively decided upon calling this interval a doubly augmented fourth. This just means that it's one half step larger than an augmented fourth. (As such, the augmented fourth is not ...


37

I don't know that there is any evidence that the tritone was ever formally banned by the Catholic Church, although that story does get passed around a lot. An actual Church document that discusses this and puts the claim in context is needed. I see no mention of tritones or intervals of any type in Musicam Sacram of 1967. The Sacrosanctum Concilium of 1963, ...


27

Yes, it'll change how you listen to music. Anything you learn about will affect your appreciation. Watch a magic trick, and it's magic. Find out how it's done, and it's not magic any more - to you. Several of my students have said that now, they don't listen to music like they used to. ' I know exactly what's happening in that part', 'I know what trick's ...


26

D-D is unison (or "prime") Db-D or D-D# is augmented prime and Db-D# is a double augmented unison or prime. P.S. This is really something different than the enharmonic variants Db-Eb, but that was not the question.


23

C sharp major has seven sharps, D flat major has five flats. Out of the box, the latter is preferable. The former may be more appropriate when there is more material requiring "flattening" the key signature than otherwise. Now major is a rather sharp mode, so it's not quite unlikely. For example, a "proper" fully diminuished chord in C sharp features C-...


23

Modes are what we call rotations of the major scale. This means that we can start off with the major-scale interval pattern and just rotate it to begin at different places to create the other modes. WWHWWWH Ionian (equivalent to the major scale) WHWWWHW Dorian HWWWHWW Phrygian WWWHWWH Lydian WWHWWHW ...


20

The interval from any G (flat / sharp / neutral) to any A (flat / sharp / neutral) (in the same octave) is always a second. In your case, since the G is flat and the A is sharp, you have a doubly augmented second. Of course, this interval is sonically equivalent to a major third.


19

No, they are not considered consonant in all music cultures. The perception of consonance and dissonance can be different among cultures. The same interval can be perceived (and labeled) differently by different cultures. This is influenced by many factors (and the harmonic series is not the only one!) For example, in medieval times major thirds were ...


19

My answer builds on the answer contributed by DR6. Based on your reaction to other very good answers posted here already, your question seems to boil down to: "Why do humans innately feel that certain intervals are consonant". And so much so that they are willing to call them "perfect". Before getting to that question, let's look at why Western culture ...


18

Well, a musical chord is by definition a collection of two or more notes sounding simultaneously. So, mathematically, in the usually used 12-tone pitch system of Western/pop/jazz music, there are 2^11 - 1 = 2047 different possible combinations of pitch classes modulo transposition (2^11 is the number of ways additional tones can be added once you fix a root ...


18

The technical term for the scale seems to be the Minor "Gypsy" Scale and it is also known as the Flamenco Mode. The basic idea is it is a combination of two Phrygian Dominant tetrachords, or a Phrygian Dominant with a Major 7th scale degree. Here are the links that show both scales match the pattern above and includes the root scale of it the Phrygian ...


17

I really think the answer to this question has most to do with how music is composed. Tonal composers are not really thinking at all about the math behind the intervals; they're thinking about the sounds. Another way of looking at this is that all tonal music is scale-based, and when playing a scale from bottom to top you number the notes starting from 1. ...


17

The confusion lies here: I also have heard that an inversion is simply in the opposite direction of the original interval. So a descending 3rd from F to D is the inversion of ascending third F to A. This should instead read "a descending third from F to D is the inversion of an ascending sixth from F to D." The problem really lies in the wording of that ...


17

There is a kind of historic flow back and forth. A very long time ago during the Middle Ages - when parallel organum was way to harmonize - the perfect fourth was consonant. Later when triadic harmony developed along with counterpoint the perfect fourth was treated as a dissonance that resolved to a third. Later yet again, in modern time, the fourth is ...


16

What I am going to write below is just simple jazz harmony fundamentals, and should naturally be considered as school stuff ! You have to understand the role of each voice in a chord, to define what should be played, and what can be omitted. Mandatory voices The root note defines the root of the chord, and must be played globally. I mean, if you have a ...


16

A chord does not have to be made up of thirds. A chord is by definition two or more notes heard as if sounded simultaneously. Not all chords have three notes either. There are dyads (two notes), triads (three), tetrachords (four), pentachords (five), and hexachords (six). There's no limit on the number of notes, and also, by definition, there's no limits on ...


16

In general, smaller intervals do not sound as pleasing in a bass register as they do in a treble register. This is a general effect that occurs regardless of whether you play a consonance or a dissonance, although it is more noticeable with dissonances. What happens is that the overtones of the bass notes end up having more noticeable clashes between them, ...


16

It's more about context than it is about written music. It's called a third because it's the third step in the scale. Take the C major scale for example. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 C D E F G A B The C major chord is C E G: the first, third, and fifth steps (degrees) of the C major scale. It's the same case with minor triads. Here is the C minor scale: 1 ...


16

Transcribing music is EXCELLENT ear training practice. I like to tell students that transcribing one song to completion is like an entire semester of ear training. Don’t just listen for intervals and notes, but form, where tension is created and released, see if you can name all the instruments, sounds, or stereo techniques (panning, phasing, etc). ...


15

In classical Western music theory, each diatonic scale contains seven notes, and each of the notes must be assigned a different note name. (So one also does not write CX for the D in the C major scale.) In non-equal temperament, C# and Db may in fact be two different pitches, and a diatonic scale that contains a C must not also contain a C#. In more ...


15

Sure is! These are called Intervals. It has to do with the number of "Scale Degrees" that separate two notes - basically, the number of notes you have to move through the scale from the first note to reach the second note (including the note you started on). These are worded "Second", "Third", "Fourth", "Fifth", "Sixth", "Seventh", "Octave" (Octave ...


15

Well, without any further context there is no possible distinction between a minor third and an augmented second as they are indeed the same note, technically. However, the phrases minor third and augmented second make reference not only to that space of three semitones, but also to the relationship that this interval plays within a given chord or scale. ...


15

Any tips on how to make it sick, so to speak, when trying to internalize the distance between notes? There are three ways you can easily get those intervals in your head. Sing Singing the intervals will make learning them much more easier and effective. Try this before doing your interval exercises: Pick one interval you are having troubles with. Play ...


15

Your chart looks correct, with one exception: in your bottom chart, the diminished 11th should be 15 semitones from C, not 12. In theory, every interval is possible and valid, with the exception of flagrantly wrong intervals like a "major fourth." With that said, there is a point of diminishing returns: it's almost always pointless to go through the trouble ...


15

I don't know your source, but the term "diatonic scale" typically refers to the major scale and its rotations (i.e., the modes). As such, we can test this claim just by looking at the intervals of a major scale. All seconds within in the scale are either minor (E–F and B–C) or major (C–D, D–E, F–G, G–A, A–B). All thirds are either minor (D–F, E–G, A–C, B–D) ...


14

Sure, chords can contain major and minor thirds at the same time! We see 'em all the time in jazz. I call it a major-minor chord (which however is quite different from a major-minor seventh chord). It's also called a mixed-third chord. In jazz chords you will also sometimes see it notated as a ♯9 instead of as a ♭3, though that implies a slightly different ...


14

You are looking at the chords in an interesting way, but you are over complicating the subject a lot and have a few slight misconceptions. I to V or i to V is a very normal chord movement and it is quite strong, but the the opposite is much stronger i.e. V to I or V to i. The movement is so strong at the end of a phrase the movement is known as an authentic ...


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