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2 votes

What are "apparent octaves and unisons"?

An apparent octave (or fifth) occurs when a note is double but is not intended to create another "voice." For example, in strict four-part harmony, one tries to keep all four voices ...
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1 vote

Are voices that have very big pitch difference always independent and less dissonant?

"If one wants to write voices that are very independent, then they should follow the rules of counterpoint." Well, sort of. You continue to obsess on the 'rules' of 17th century vocal part-...
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3 votes

Are voices that have very big pitch difference always independent and less dissonant?

One slight obstacle to a straightforward answer is that the word 'dissonant' can have different meanings in different contexts. It may simplify the discussion to put that term on one side for a ...
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4 votes

Are voices that have very big pitch difference always independent and less dissonant?

The point about closer voices blending more readily together is certainly true. The one about dissonances I wouldn't really agree with, unless we're talking extreme differences (four octaves or more ...
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4 votes

Are voices that have very big pitch difference always independent and less dissonant?

You are correct, more or less. One thing that needs to be said: Dissonance does in its root mean "something that sounds apart", while consonance means "something that sounds together. ...
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0 votes

Why don't we measure the size of intervals starting from zero?

The best answer here is given by user19146, that the reason is historical. According to an article in Scientific American, zero reached Europe by the 1100's, but it was not in common use. Sir Isaac ...
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