New answers tagged

3

Sometimes diminished thirds are respelled to make reading easier, but here's why it can be important to call a diminished third a diminished third. This post contains three parts: 1) Helping to hear the intervals, 2) some examples of how they arise, and 3) some examples from compositions. Notice that in all cases (shown here, at least), the diminished third ...


5

You've picked an extreme example! Outside a theory test paper, a diminished 3rd is more likely to look like this. Maybe within a dom7+5 chord.


2

This may be a different perspective from other answers, but this fairly-influential study in patients with intractable epilepsy looked at the ability to distinguish note intervals in order to correlate the brain ares responsible for processing such things. They noted that with respect to timing of notes, there was a fundamental dissociation between metre and ...


1

You probably know the trick to connect each interval with the first motif (interval) of a song: e.g. dim 5th (respectively aug. 4th) => „Maria“ and minor 7th => „Somewhere“ (West Side Story) Each tone of a melody has a function by its tension, or may better, a tension by its function: tonic and dominant are stable, fa and ti are leading tones, la is ...


3

As Tim correctly says, it's an entirely different thing. Here's what I would recommend (i. e. what helped me): Practice sight-singing (i. e. singing from the score only if you are played the first note on an instrument). It's sort of an inverse problem but it helps immensely (and not only with transcribing). I bought a sight-singing book to practice with; ...


2

I think there's a big difference between hearing two notes (or more), and being able to play them on your instrument, and hearing those same notes and naming their intervals with no other reference. In fact, often, on guitar in particular, (but in reality on any instrument) we can hear a couple of notes, and instinctively hit the second one once the first ...


2

An interval is the distance between any two named pitches, regardless of context. So, F and G are a major second apart from each other no matter what context they appear in. In a melodic interval the notes sound consecutively. In a harmonic interval the notes sound simultaneously. In terms of their relationship to a tonic pitch, that is thought of less in ...


0

Your question: are the tones F and G referred to C an interval called the 4th respectively the 5th or can they also be related to each other? The answer is: yes! Interval means the difference - or better: the distance - to the root of the scale, but also to the root of the chord and even the distance between any two or more tones, sounding together as “...


0

Intervals are note specific. And not even pitch specific! Obviously an interval is the 'space' between two notes - but those two notes could be found in different keys, so can't be key specific. Example: (yours) F>G is M2. Both F and G are in key C, and key F. However, the key specific bit could be that certain notes are not in a particular key, or are ...


2

Western music theory evolved from trying to explain and describe tonal music. Tonal music uses the diatonic scale as its main musical device. In the diatonic scale, there are seven notes: do, re, mi, fa, sol, la, si and do again. The viewpoint that was initially used to describe this scale sees the large distances between do-re, re-mi, fa-sol, sol-la and la-...


Top 50 recent answers are included