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4

Because it wasn't spell it with a Bb. E to A is a fourth of some type. Lower the E with a flat and it becomes an augmented fourth. Add the sharp to the A and it is augmented (made larger by a half step) again and so it's called double augmented, a double augmented fourth. ...Is it simply because the enharmonic equivalent Bb should have been used, as that’...


3

'If played, you'd identify it as a perfect fifth'. Maybe, maybe not. The sound of any interval is only half the story. Every interval has at least two different names but only one sound. The other half of the story is what actual notes are being played. Their names, and where they live on the stave. E♭ > A♯. Any E>A is going to be a 4th - of ...


0

What does it mean to play an interval “below”? You need the specific interval and the reference tone. Like: play a perfect fifth below A. It's not clear if the intention is to play both tones together, but I would expect that. Someone could say I'll play this riff and then add you play it an octave below to double the part. ...If someone tells me to play ...


2

A power 'chord' consists of a root note, the note a P5 above it, and sometimes the note an octave above that root. As in D - A - (D). To play 'a fifth below' would be to use the same notes, but as an inversion. Probably called a second inversion, but who knows, as there's no 3rd there,(and with only two notes to play with, could there ever be anything more ...


0

The theory term must be modal interchange. Like a borrowed chord is an example of modal interchange we have here the case that the whole scale adapted to the tune is modal changed. https://music.tutsplus.com/tutorials/introduction-to-modal-interchange--audio-14142


1

Extraneous modulation is going from one key to an unrelated one. Parallel modulation would be a good term for going into the parallel major/minor.


1

This is called Modulating to a parallel key. Reference: https://www.musicnotes.com/now/tips/a-complete-guide-to-musical-modulation/.


4

I think you first want to use the wording change of mode to capture the major to minor change. You often read something like "...a change to the minor mode..." Modulation is not a good choice, because the meaning of that word is very clear, and means only a change of tonic without any indication of what happens in the new tonic. I think the typical usage of ...


2

The ninth of a chord is, of course, not a fifth below the fifth of a chord. However, I have just re-read the page in question from Persichetti's excellent Twentieth Century Harmony. Context is everything. This section of the book is dealing with resonance of chords, in particular in relation to the spacing of the Harmonic Series. The confusion here may be ...


1

I think the answer is "yes". (In any theory question, the answer to "Does it matter?" is almost always yes.) Your example -- "down a minor 3rd from B major" -- must mean changing to a key with the note name two lower, i.e. G; and to make this a minor third it must be G# major. The similar question "Transpose down an augmented 2nd from B major" results in ...


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