Skip to main content

New answers tagged

3 votes

How did tetrachords become whole and half steps?

I'll try to summarize the main bits of this development. First, let's note that our modern idea there were only three types of tetrachord (diatonic, chromatic, enharmonic) is oversimplified and really ...
Athanasius's user avatar
  • 12.6k
0 votes

Interval exercise gone wrong?

It is a full 7th interval with no modification, so major. Minor 7th is correct. You're sort of right about 'no modification'. But the baseline isn't 'no accidentals in the notation'. It's the ...
Laurence's user avatar
  • 93.6k
2 votes

Interval exercise gone wrong?

The book is correct in labeling them like that. The problem is that these intervals are labeled due to the number of semitones between them: 0 Perfect unison 1 Minor second 2 Major second ...
haxor789's user avatar
  • 191
2 votes

Interval exercise gone wrong?

Errors in understanding it should be M7 not m7 it is a full 7 interval with no modification, so major The size of an interval is not determined by whether the notes do or do not include modification....
Aaron's user avatar
  • 90.1k
2 votes

Interval exercise gone wrong?

it should be M7 not m7 it is a full 7 interval with no modification, so major It is good that you are look for modifications, accidentals, but when there are no modifying accidentals, the term to use ...
Michael Curtis's user avatar
9 votes

Interval exercise gone wrong?

I think there are two misunderstandings, and I think one of them hasn't been covered yet. When naming intervals, some of them have a "perfect" version; these are unisons (same note), 4ths, ...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
  • 17.9k
8 votes

Interval exercise gone wrong?

The 1st one is indeed m7. Any D>C is a 7th of some sort. Imagine, for a moment, that we're in key D. For the C to be M7, it would need to be C♯. Another criterion is that m7 intervals have 10 ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 194k

Top 50 recent answers are included