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All the chords are Bb, Ab, Eb in that order (which eschews a descending fifth progression, common in rock) ...except the one Db which is just interposed between two Eb chords. The only thing you can get from that is a likely key signature of three flats with a Db thrown in. You could label it like a blues turnaround V IV I that would make the tonic Eb and ...


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I don't want to just give you a link and run. But I would look at http://musicnotation.org/ for an alternative way of looking at this. Basically, it is different sheet music notation that simply gives a space on the clef for each half step, does away with the sharp/flats notation, and makes it so that each clef is an octave apart (so no learning to read base,...


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In key C it is quite easy to see, translate and play certain intervals, one of the reasons C is usually the first key to be explored in tutorials, particularly on piano. Those white keys seem simpler! Once one gets into key sigs of 3,4 or more sharps or flats, more especially when the music contains accidentals (those at the beginning aren't!), it gets ...


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As you noticed this relative aproach is useful but has its limitations. I think the first step is to learn your scales. Learn them one sharp and one flat at a time. And build your way around the circle of fifths. In a key with little flats or sharps your trick of relative reading will still work, but you will have to stay aware that some notes will be ...


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Your way is one approach to play music. It is really just “playing” by imitating, guessing and listening. But as you see you don’t get far this way. You have come to the point where you realize there has to be another way! I call it “working”. This means you should study some basic theory about keys, scales, chords, harmony, chord progression and ...


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In the traditional way of finding the sharps and flats in each key, you start at C major (no sharps or flats) and go up a fifth to add a sharp. Then another fifth to add another sharp, and so forth. To remove a sharp or add a flat you go down a fifth. The keys are usually written around the circumference of a big circle so that keys played the same way (for ...


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As a classical musician, I always went by the number of shaprs or flats and then memorized the key that went with them which results in the circle of fiths. I have to remember to insert them so you look at the key signature first you know. If you want to think anbout what key you are in you can but I was always trying to get those notes in and keeping up ...


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I think the answer is "yes". (In any theory question, the answer to "Does it matter?" is almost always yes.) Your example -- "down a minor 3rd from B major" -- must mean changing to a key with the note name two lower, i.e. G; and to make this a minor third it must be G# major. The similar question "Transpose down an augmented 2nd from B major" results in ...


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