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The idea that modes and scales evoke different emotions is an idea that goes back to ancient times. Metal uses modes and scale appropriate for the emotions it wants to express. Minor and exotic modes tend to be the modes of choice for a lot of metal music. You can flip the question around to understand how some things are not appropriate for certain moods. ...


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Simple answer? Because humans make symbols. Because we associate the minor mode with all the things metal wants to stand for. Long answer? (Ok, you asked for it—) We’ve been conditioned by several centuries of Western tonal tradition to associate major mode with happiness, life, light, and positivity, and minor mode with sadness, death, darkness, and despair....


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Doesn't it just come down to definition? As a gross simplification, Metal (by definition) is a genre that sounds dark/sinister, and as such tends to gravitate away from the major key, which doesn't tend to be associated with those moods. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heavy_metal_music states "Traditional heavy metal tends to employ modal scales, in ...


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In addition to phoog's statement that Baroque-era music was often written with one fewer flat in the key signature than we'd expect given the tonic (e.g. J.S. Bach's Toccata and Fugue in D minor, BWV 538 "Dorian"), note that no A's or A flats are used in that C minor cadential phrase that uses the key signature with the A flat in parentheses. The ...


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A little-known fact is that the historical basis of minor tonality is the Dorian mode. Consequently, much 18th-century tonal music is written in a key signature that seems to lack one flat sign. This is especially common for chorales, since the tunes are frequently from the 16th or even 15th century, when they were unambiguously Dorian. The parentheses ...


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