Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.

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2

Maybe nothing to do with common key signatures. B♭, E♭, A♭, D♭ going on to G♭ with 6 flats. Because F♯ also has 6 sharps. However - that very note F♯ features a heck of a lot more in music than its enharmonic equivalent of G♭. It's a better known name! The best place to ask this is with the manufacurers - who will ...


0

An Gb and an F# harmonica are the same thing. The same note has two different names. An E## harmonica would also be the same.


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Yes, they do have different effects. Often the difference is one of distance, or smoothness. A modulation from C to G will sound very smooth, because there's only one pitch that is different between C and G major. A modulation from C to F♯, though, will sound rather distant, because there's only one pitch in common between the two keys (there are sort ...


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It's obvious to me that there are several different methods for determining the key of a song. I use the method described by Richard and I find the key almost immediately most of the time, but just like everything else in music, I had to work at it in the beginning, I had to learn how to hear it. I don't think that one size fits all with this technique and ...


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I play guitar and generally start with ear and instinct. It gets a lot easier when my conscious mind knows what key signature I'm in. In order to confirm to my conscious mind, I look for the semitone intervals that match the song. For example, if the notes B and C both sound right to me, then it's either a mode of C major (with C as the tonic) or a mode of G ...


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The way I do it, as the song plays, I just play random notes on my instrument. It's very apparent which notes are not in the key as they will sound like a train wreck when you play them along with the song. So I quickly know what notes to avoid, the notes that mostly sound like they "fit" will be the seven notes in the key. The note that they all tend to ...


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Disagree with the first two concepts, agree with Richard's. The tonic note is literally key to it all. Find that, and you usually have the scale used and the chords available. may be major, may be minor, but that's not a big deal to work out. The tonic is the 'home' note, and thence the home chord. It's the one where in a piece, things could stop at that ...


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I just figure out the scale, and from there you're going to be able to ballpark what key you're in. A key can use different scales, but the tonic note is what gives the key away. If it's an A major scale chances are you're playing in A. It gets mroe complicated in classical or jazz, but for your rock/pop/folk/country/blues music this works more often than ...


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Do you find it faster to try to figure out chords and then guess and surmise the key? ... or perhaps a similar method but with a basic scale or figuring out the melody by ear. I would personally go with none of the above! The "key" of a song (or composition, etc.) is just another word for the "tonic" of the piece. And by tonic, we mean the most stable ...


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By ear This is an ear training approach that many music programs use: try to sing the tonic note of whatever chord progression you are listening to. You start by singing the tonic of chords, then move to sing the tonic of a progression, to eventually sing the tonic of a song. That's your key. By doing this you are trying to find the pitch that sounds more ...


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