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1

On Noteflight, the shift key plus either up arrow or down arrow will transpose the selected elements up or downwards respectively by a chromatic semitone. This can be used in conjunction with the key signature change to transpose the music to a new key with a new key signature. The example passage is in the key of C major (or whatever key the no-sharps-or-...


1

In key changes, the most important factor is the tonic - does it move. In this simple blues chord progression, I don't feel tonic movement away from E. And I doubt that you could play any kind of licks that would move the tonic, whatever solo notes you layer over the backing chords. E is the home note. Well, as long as the backing chords change at a ...


3

Most other answers say no, and I do agree - mainly because 'key' is a word usually used to describe the tonality of whole pieces or sections larger than the duration of a single chord.... ...but if you really feel you are changing the scale you are playing on every chord, there is a good chance that doing so may give some sense of 'tonicisation' to each ...


2

Improvising musicians often try to find a single scale that embraces all the chords in a sequence, and call that scale the 'key' of the sequence. That can work. But other chords can also be used, ones that don't fit that one scale, and they don't necessarily mean the music changes key. Not even to the limited extent that a secondary dominant implies a ...


3

Playing a Blues with E7, A7 and B7 means you're definitely in key E. when the progression moves to A7, and then B7, you're still in key E.Imagine a song with half a dozen chords in it. Every time the chord changes, we change key? No, no, no! Using Em pent over E7 works well. There are plenty of players that use Em pent. over A7 and B7 too. It sort of works, ...


4

No, it's not changing "key." To really answer the question you would need to see the main melody of the song. Typically the melody would be in a blues mode with a tonic of E. That will not be diatonic, like the key of E major. It's more chromatic. But that doesn't mean the tonic is changing during the song. When you talk about "play this scale ...


0

Yes, B♭ major to E♭ major is trivial. Just stick in some A♭ notes. Shall we be a bit more adventurous? A lot of discussion on modulation concentrates on the chord progression. Melody is also important. Here's a simple transition from C major to E♭ major. It's carried by repetition of a simple melodic phrase. Also consider the 'just do it' modulation. ...


0

B♭ major and E♭ major are very closely related. In fact, there's only one diatonic note that changes - A♮ becomes A♭ when the key changes to E♭ major. So I doubt there could be a more subtle, unnoticable key change. In fact, there are many instances in pieces where the music modulates in that way, and most people would not consider there's much of a move. ...


3

There are several ways. One easy one is to use a pivot chord; this is a chord that is diatonic in both keys; one approaches the chord in the first key and exits the chord in the target key. In your case, Bb to Eb, one could use Cm. It's the ii chord of Bb and the vi chord of Eb. A possibility (not necessarily the best) is to play a Gm chord (also diatonic in ...


1

No. But to the extent that lowering pitches has a "darkening" mood and raising a "brightening" mood, then modulating in the direction of keys with flats - technically modulating by descending fifth, which can be done with naturals too - has a "darkening" effect. Of course you can use all sort of adjectives. You could call it &...


2

The E♭ indication should be taken to mean "I'm performing the following analysis relative to the key of E♭". This is a standard notation for this kind of harmonic analysis. Accidentals follow the convention that they last throughout the measure in which they appear and are cancelled by the bar line. To illustrate, consider the VII chord in the ...


2

It appears that there is no definitively correct answer, with various sources indicating different approaches. So I submit the following argument for the use of accidentals for D Dorian, G mixolydian etc. as pure opinion with no claim to authority. The most important information to immediately glean from a key signature, it would seem to me, would be tonal ...


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