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3

In music, there's a notion that we call octave equivalence. It basically states that, in certain conditions, any instance of a given pitch, no matter what the octave, is viewed as equivalent to all other instances of that pitch. I say this because key signatures assume octave equivalence. Thus, even though the left-most sharp in the key signature is for a ...


1

I have had a lot of experience using hand signals over the years. It started for me in the 80’s early in my career in New York then in LA after I moved there. The signals you described are basically what I have used, sharps up and flats down except for one thing, Like Ed Finn said, in New York and some other eastern cities flats are up and sharps are down. I ...


0

In the Common Practice Period (CPP) descriptions of Western Harmony (still used in much if not most music, Latin, pop, jazz, movie themes, country, rock, blues, etc.) a "key" consists of a primary note (termed the "tonic") and a set of chords commonly used to highlight this note (and its chords). A scale is a set of notes with linear ...


5

No there isn't, and I counsel against inventing one! The distinction between 'multi', 'poly' or any other prefix you could come up with won't be immediately clear, and there will be confusion between your intended meaning and SIMULTANEOUSLY multiple keys. If you want to describe this, do it in plain English. Something like 'This passage has frequent ...


4

Yes. This is often referred to as Modulation. However, it is not mandatory for a change in key signature when it comes to modulation. This can be achieved by the use of accidentals as well.


5

There's no specific term for the fact of changing key signatures frequently (but see ViviRukisha's answer), but in light of the term multi-metric I see no reason not to coin the term multi-tonal or multi-modulatory. The latter might be better to avoid confusion with polytonal.


2

I will venture a mix of reasons, which I won't claim to be scientifically justified but I think substantially account for this experience. The two-step 19edo semitone (~126cents) is closer to the familiar 12edo semitone (100cents) than the one-step 19edo semitone(~63cents), although both are quite far off. However the two-step semitone is considerably closer ...


0

I think we're giving unnecessarily complicated answers here. The piece, based in F major, has modulated to D minor. This is conventionally notated with the same key signature as its relative major, F. When the Harmonic or Melodic forms of the D minor scale are used, they are notated with accidentals. Here, we seem to be using the D melodic minor scale. B♮ ...


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