New answers tagged

5

Another interpretation of this song and chord progression is that is it not in a major or minor mode at all but in another mode, namely E dorian. The notes of the (modern) E dorian scale are E F# G A B C# D E, and all the chords you name can be found there; in addition, the keystone chord of the progression is an E chord, and the melody is plausibly anchored ...


11

The key of the song tells you where the home note, tonic, is. When the harmony moves to the home chord, for example C major in the key of C major, it creates a sense of relief and being at rest. It's entirely possible to be aware of where home is, but still avoid going there, even indefinitely. That way you keep the listener feeling some tension and deny an ...


1

I was revisiting the movie vault watching Oliver and Company with my kids, and the song "Why Should I Worry," performed by Billy Joel and featured in the movie, drops down a whole tone from verse to chorus and then drops a minor third to the relative minor, but changed to a major key. A really cool example of some logical, if maybe not common key changes. ...


6

Without judging whether it appropriate, I think the reason someone might use two flats in the key signature is the Eb7 chord of the vamp and the E flat at the end of the first part of the melody... ...could be considered to come from the Phrygian mode rather than tritone substitution/altered dominant harmony. If a tritone substitute is considered clearly ...


1

I think the E♭9 is the "foreign" chord here. So i think the piece (hard without having seen the whole piece) is correctly in D minor, with the E♭9 possible a tritone substitute. I think you were on the right track, but if you can share the whole piece, then i can get it right 100%.


0

As a saxophone player (it's a monophonic instrument, so I am largely unaffected by chords, unless I am playing multiphonics or "virtual" chords in my head during solos), I found it slightly easier to play key signatures that have flats rather than sharps when I was a beginner, because of the mechanics of my instrument. To give you an example (pictures taken ...


0

Heres' the way I think of this -- it's a bit different from the earlier explanations, so may help provide another point of view. The main distinction of the key of C major is that it has no sharps or flats. So, the C major scale is C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C. The C major chord then is the 1st, 3rd and 5th note of the scale, so C, E, G. So far so good -- now ...


2

I much favour keys with small accidental count. In this case: Cb has 40% extra accidentals with respect to B. Those extra accidentals are millions of times rustier inside my brain than for example the tone Bb, as I never use them (other than literally as accidentals, i.e. passing tones or other melodic devices). As a result, the difficulty increases much ...


2

Brass players are more at home in flat keys because their instruments are built that way: with fundamentals of F, Bb and Eb. (Yes, I know: trumpets in A, C and D, trombones in G and probably others also exist!) Guitars have a slight bias towards the sharp side. (Yes, I know: capos!) On a piano any key is fine, but I can't think of a piece in Cb. Can anyone? ...


1

I don't know what you mean by 'technically' changing the key? You're playing chord shapes in A minor - THINKING in A minor - but on an instrument that has been shifted up by 4 semitones. So an Am chord shape produces a C♯m sound. No technicalities, just that straightforward fact.


0

The method I use to determine the capoed key is based on which root chord form (C, D, E, A, F, G, etc.) in first position I'm using to play higher on the neck in the capoed position. I simply add 1/2 steps represented by the frets to the original chord fingering pattern to arrive at the newly adjusted key. In order to determine the scale fingering pattern ...


1

Here's a quick and dirty rule that you can apply without thinking about it. (Though it's good to eventually get a real understanding.) The open strings of a standard guitar are tuned to C major (and A minor). Imagine the note C (or A) on the piano, count up 4 additional semi-tones, and you'll be on E (or C♯). The guitar is now tuned to E major (and C# ...


2

The capo thing can get real confusing and all the capo cheat sheets online look different, so its hard to know what's the best logic to use to figure this stuff out. The best logic to understand how it functions is: to learn the chromatic scale to learn the names of the strings to understand what tones will sound when you play a certain chord pattern The ...


12

When you play an Am fingering with a capo on the 4th fret, the sounding chord is C#m and sound is what counts. When other people listen to your guitar and sing or play along with it, they don't need to know how you used a capo. would this technically change the Key to A minor? No. If there's another guitarist, you can explain as a technical detail that ...


5

All those chords are diatonic to key Am - when there's no capo. Wherever the capo goes means you count up that many semitones. So if it was on the second fret, all the chords would be one whole tone higher. In this scenario, they'd be Bm D A Em G F♯, respectively. However, you've gone up another tone, making two tones higher than original no capo ...


12

No, you are playing in C# min. The point of the capo is to allow you to use open string chord forms in any key rather than bar chords.


-1

Im a violinist and guitarist, so I find C-sharp to be easier than D-flat on this instrument. My best friend is a pianist, who prefers D-flat. Same with one of my other harpist friends, who prefers D-flat unanimously, because C-sharp just doesn't go well with the harp (neither does d-flat tho :/). HOnestly, I think that the gap in use just depends on the kind ...


0

The example you have chosen, A minor and E major, don't break the rule, they rather reinforce a very common special case. Those of us who were taught traditional harmony in the mid 20th century knew that the sure trick for differentiating between C major and A minor - both of them 'all white notes' by key signature - was to spot the sharpened 7th of the ...


2

This is the question, that I had been asking myself for quite some time, and though I am by no means a professional musician and do NOT have a perfect pitch I still think that the key is to some extent important. I would not argue that a half-tone change will make the music sound different for me, but the large differences will sound differently. The reason ...


0

Elfman is both right and wrong. With respect to traditional music, he is very wrong. Suppose an instrument is tuned to a specific key, not with equal temperaments. A tune played in the instrument's key will sound different than the same tune played in a different key. For instance, using the diatonic scale, if an instrument is tuned to the key of "C", the ...


1

Here's the quick dodge for transpositions (as long as you know your key signatures!) E♭ baritone has three 'built-in' flats. It's 'in E♭' after all! So, to play music for an instrument 'in C' (i.e. normal untransposed piano, no 'built-in' flats or sharps) we have to take away those three flats. Which is the same as adding three sharps. So ...


1

It seems from your question that you want to play a song in C major on your baritone sax so you can play it in the same key as any accompanying instruments (that is, in "concert pitch"). To do that, you have correctly identified that you will be playing in the key of A major. You can do this at sight by imagining that the treble staff's bottom line isn't ...


7

There are other questions here that have dealt with this topic. Basically, there are good reasons why historically certain keys sounded different from others, due to the fact that unequal temperaments were more common, and thus some keys would sound more "in-tune" than others. These aspects of tuning often influenced the choices of genres for writing music ...


5

There's no evidence that I'm aware of that in an equal temperament world different keys have intrinsically distinct characters, in the sense that Bb major would relate to a different range of emotions than C major. I guess I find it a bit surprising that you find Elfman's statement noteworthy - It seems fairly intuitive that with most people possessing ...


2

At https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theoretical_key the key you're looking for IS mentioned. 6 doubles plus 1 adds up to 13 flats. It's in the list. You could also have worked this out from first principles. C major has no flats (or sharps). C♭ major therefore has ALL the flats, 7 of them. Similarly, G♭ major has 6 flats. G♭♭ major ...


1

Saxophone are transposing instruments: Your instrument is called Eb-Sax because it plays an Eb when you play a written C. This means it transposes a minor 3rd up (and as a Bariton an 8ve down!) So you have to notate and play an A on your instrument when you want to hear C. (your instrument will transpose the A a minor 3rd up ...)


2

Basic transpositions for sax,l trumpet etc Bb instruments (Bb clarinet, tenor/soprano sax, trumpet ...) Up one tone. C => D, F => G etc Eb instruments (alto/baritone sax) Down 3 semitones. C => A, F => D etc Players of transposing instruments need to know these by heart (and being able to do simple transposition more or less by sight is also ...


2

If you mean that your written sax music will be in A, then you are not changing the key, as it would still sound in C. If you mean you want the song to sound in A, then that would put your sax part into 6 sharps!


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