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3

You will need a reference instrument: a piano perhaps, or one of those pitch-pipes guitarists use when tuning their instrument. If you listen for a while you may be able to decide "Ah! that's the very bottom note: that quiet one!", and then find it on your reference instrument. Am I right in thinking there is a 'break' between the lowest octave and ...


1

Try to sing the melody, phrase by phrase. Usually a phrase ends on the first degree or if it is a half cadence on the fifth. In major this is do or so, in minor this is la or mi. I would think the first step would be to find out the scale of the song, that would narrow down the options of the keys. (If you don’t know the names of movable do re mi you can ...


2

Listen for cadences, where the music is at a rest point. Particularly the ones at the end of a verse, or chorus. They will generally provide a triad chord - here a minor triad. One of those notes - often the one played - will be the root of that triad, and thus be the tonic. The notes here seem to be from a natural minor scale, which could also translate to ...


3

There may be a historical connection. As discussed in "The A♭–C–E Complex," these major-third key relationships are most common within those three keys, and not, for example, between B♭, D, and F♯. The claim that the author makes—and I find it very convincing—is that these major-third cycles were most in tune in earlier practice with these three ...


0

To compare your impression of E - Ab (=G#) with Bb - D you must play the progression Bb - F - A - D. Will you feel still any difference? I bet that no!


4

Objectively, there should be no difference, since E and Ab(G#) majors bear the same relationship as Bb and D majors. Allowing, then, it's a matter of personal perception/preference, I propose two possibilities: You prefer the shift from sharps (E major) to flats (Ab major) over the shift from flats (Bb major) to sharps (D major): There is a feeling that is ...


0

This song is very probably in G. It would be interesting to know the final chord. If it’s a G major it will be definitely G. It might also be fading out with this 4 chord pattern ... and it would be still G major even if latest chord you can hear is one of the 3 others. I guess I would play it hearing it in G, I can’t imagine a melody that fits to these 3 ...


2

Whilst it's often possible to look at all the chords in a song and determine what the key is, it doesn't always work. And going through modes isn't much help, either. There are so many questions in similar vein that it would appear there's some sort of 'rule' being taught that says 'chords must only belong to a song if their notes are diatonic to that key'. ...


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