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0

There is no mystery to this. Play major and minor scales, along with basic cadences in all twelve major/minor keys. Use the circle of fifths, up to 6 sharps or flats, to get the various key signatures. You can play the scales in various broken intervals like broken thirds and fourth. This will help build a "map" of intervals on the fretboard. Adam ...


3

your modulation works fine: It is built by 5 phrases of 2x2 bars. I'd bring them in this order: bars 1-4: C - C/E - Am C - G7 5-8: C - C/B - Am C/E - D F 9-12: Bb - Bb - F/A - F/A 13-16:Bb - Bb - F/A - G 17-20: C - C/E - Am C - G7 Am C/E could be understood as vi-vi34 (egc ~ am7) leading to D (circle of fifths) D can be considered as a secondary dominant V/...


3

That F chord is much more than a pivot chord. Of course it works as such, but it happens to be the dominant of the new key - B♭. That's a very common ploy to make way into a new key. I guess that the majority of folk who hear a dominant chord, (or a dominant seventh chord), would expect its tonic to follow.It's what dominants do! Taking things a little ...


2

The next phase in this kind of composing method would be adding a melody, but you don't mention melody at all. Melody lines can be very important in whether a modulation feels smooth or not. A song in C could well have the chords D7 - F - Bb somewhere. What matters is, where and how the chord changes are rhythmically, and what the melody does. For example, ...


3

In traditional terms, the D7 is unusual, but you aren't breaking any rules, and in a pop setting especially, it works well. A formal analysis seems like overkill here, but an informal one might be helpful. Imagine you were planning a modulation to G minor rather than B♭ major. In that case, your Amin -> C/E -> D7 -> F would be interpreted as ii ->...


0

Since there's only one 'chromatic' note that needs the button pressed in - F♯ - to play every note in the key of G as opposed to key C, it's not an onerous task. When you need that F♯, just play the F♮ hole, and press in the button. Voila, the harp is in tune for key G. Even in key D, there's only one other note to change - C♯ - which is every C blown with ...


2

This shouldn't be happening. Either the block is wrongly adjusted or the instrument is defective. If adjusting the block doesn't fix the problem, you should return the flute to the place you bought it for replacement or a refund.


0

Yes, B♭ major to E♭ major is trivial. Just stick in some A♭ notes. Shall we be a bit more adventurous? A lot of discussion on modulation concentrates on the chord progression. Melody is also important. Here's a simple transition from C major to E♭ major. It's carried by repetition of a simple melodic phrase. Also consider the 'just do it' modulation. ...


0

B♭ major and E♭ major are very closely related. In fact, there's only one diatonic note that changes - A♮ becomes A♭ when the key changes to E♭ major. So I doubt there could be a more subtle, unnoticable key change. In fact, there are many instances in pieces where the music modulates in that way, and most people would not consider there's much of a move. ...


3

There are several ways. One easy one is to use a pivot chord; this is a chord that is diatonic in both keys; one approaches the chord in the first key and exits the chord in the target key. In your case, Bb to Eb, one could use Cm. It's the ii chord of Bb and the vi chord of Eb. A possibility (not necessarily the best) is to play a Gm chord (also diatonic in ...


10

Well, if you mean Yamaha PSR-F51, you "feel like you don't know how to play the piano" because that is not an actual piano keyboard. A realistic piano keyboard is a weighted keyboard (which is what the P45 provides), as it imitates all the aspects of a real piano keyboard: feeling, weight and inertia. Some keyboards even have mechanics that are ...


8

The Yamaha P-45 has weighted keys to make it feel more like playing an acoustic piano.1 They will feel heavy compared to the PSR-F51, which does not have weighted keys and so are very easy to press.2 1 The P-45 spec on the Yamaha website indicates "Graded hammer standard (GHS) keyboard", which means that the keys at the bass end of the keyboard ...


1

No. But to the extent that lowering pitches has a "darkening" mood and raising a "brightening" mood, then modulating in the direction of keys with flats - technically modulating by descending fifth, which can be done with naturals too - has a "darkening" effect. Of course you can use all sort of adjectives. You could call it &...


2

The E♭ indication should be taken to mean "I'm performing the following analysis relative to the key of E♭". This is a standard notation for this kind of harmonic analysis. Accidentals follow the convention that they last throughout the measure in which they appear and are cancelled by the bar line. To illustrate, consider the VII chord in the ...


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