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You already accepted an answer, but I'll just add an edited version of the circle of fifths picture. I've added groups of 3+3 basic chords for each key signature. In this sense, if you're in the key of C, an E major chord is not much of a step at all. It's in the same group of six basic chords, just on the other side of the line that separates the three ...


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I can't comment on Laurence Payne's comment because of reputation, and I also think that the actual transposition/inversion order isn't really the crux of OP's question. At least we got OP's question properly: What I fail to understand is that he still started from the same note, so why is it not same root? Why is the ending note is suddenly the root? Is ...


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I thought that the answer to both these questions amounts to steps one needs to take on the circle of fifths... You are conflating the two circle of fifths. Root progression by descending fifth is a common harmonic progression, it is commonly called a circle of fifths, but that isn't the circle of fifth of key signatures. Circle of fifths progression is ...


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Using the circle of fourths/fifths, not everything can be simply a couple of steps away. Looking at it, anywhere you like will have the I, with its IV on one side and its V on the other side. That's pretty straightforward. But there's no reason why the other 'related' cords - the three minors and the diminished - should be anywhere near. However, if you ...


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I think you're skipping over something - he states that Rachmaninoff transposes the theme from the key of A minor to D♭ major. The key changes just because he transposes it - there's no way getting around that. I don't quite understand what you mean by changing the mode; I don't know either piece very well, but from what I can see there's no modes changing. ...


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D♭, not D♯. But stick to the main part of the explanation, where the original melody, rooted in A and rising up a perfect 5th to E is inverted. It still ends up a 5th away from A, but this time a perfect 5th DOWN, ending on D, which now feels like the root. That's the end of story as far as the 'negative melody' is concerned. Having got his ...


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You need to know which convention is being used, because there are more than one. One system simply uses upper case Roman numerals to indicate scale degrees with no reference to chord quality or scale type. For systems that use sharps and flats the basic idea is they alter the referenced scale degree from some prevailing default. In jazz and pop that ...


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There are varying opinions on this But I think we have to keep numeral notation absolute, same as letter notation. Music doesn't stay neatly in one key or mode. It's bad enough having to establish where the tonic is at any time, without having to state whether you're numbering according to major, harmonic minor, melodic minor, natural minor, Dorian.. In ...


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The first is correct: i VII VI V. Just make sure you clearly indicate that you're analyzing the passage as being in C minor. The context takes care of the rest. If, for argument's sake, the passage was otherwise in C major but those same Bb and Ab chords came up, then you would mark them as being flat: bVII bVI. Source: Tonal Harmony 5th Edition by Kostka ...


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Playing blues on a harp, drawing is the way to go. Blowing on, say, a C harp will give you the notes of that chord - C. So the blues notes, mainly, give the chord a fourth away - G. So, for a song in G, you'd need a C harp. To calculate what you need, know the guitar key, and count backwards 5, or more simply, forwards 4. As in, song's in A, use D. Song's ...


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Generally, for blues, if guitar plays in C you would use an F harp. This is to get the Bb ("blue 7th"), otherwise known as Mixolydian mode. In general, you want the harp whose key is a perfect 4th above the key of the blues. So: For a E blues, an A harp For a D blues, a G harp and so on.


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Along the same lines of what @Tim has said: These boxes are transposable--but in order to use them in other keys, it's extremely helpful to know where your root note is in all boxes. Sure, you may not know all of the notes you're playing, but if you're struggling to play in a certain key, you need to be able to construct your boxes around the root note on ...


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On the assumption you're not including open strings anywhere, 'boxes' work fine on guitar. Basically, knowing the highest and lowest positions for a key in a box, you have a minimum of two octaves - plenty to be going on with. Take a riff or tune in a key you're familiar with, say A major. Play it through, then consider that if you played it in B♭, all ...


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Bit too much for a comment, but not really an answer as yet… Some things to check - the Clavinova very likely is capable of using & sending the entire scale of CC64 [pedal]. The sequencer [or the VSTi] might only be using switch values of 0 & 127, or the worst, it toggles at values 63/64, making your pedal data well out from where you thought you ...


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You could isolate whether the cause is the VSTi by playing the MIDI through one of the different free VSTi's included in Reaper. If you're seeing the notes stay active on the MIDI data then you can rule out the keyboard/MIDI-in, and I don't see any Reaper MIDI settings that relate to this behavior so I'd lean towards it being some setting or limitation on ...


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Changing the pitch in audacity will probably mean to transform (transpose) a wave-file by "adding" + or - the pitch values up(+) or down(-). When changing the key in a notation program you have 2 options, you may transpose the notes up or down like the movable do: The tune will be unchanged, but the pitch will be changed. When changing the signature you ...


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A piece or excerpt can be atonal--i.e. it can be in no key whatsoever--and still have its pitch changed. I can change the pitch of a 12-tone serialist piece up 3 semitones and its pitch will differ, but it still won't be in any key. The key of a piece encompasses what its tonic is and whether it favours the flattened or natural/sharpened third, among other ...


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I'd like to add to some of the good answers here, this reddit one sums it up well for me Pitch is the human perception of frequency. Key is the familiar system of scales and chords with a tonic. reference


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Pitch is simply a measurement of frequency, it's a quantification of sound. Key is a musical concept describing the collection of pitches that form a framework for melody and harmony and tension/resolution, which may be based around any root pitch. When referring to single musical notes, the pitch may be a pure waveform of that frequency if it's coming ...


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Pitch and key are similar in the sense that changing the key of a piece means changing the pitch by multiples of a semitone. Of course it's possible to change the pitch by any amount, not necessarily multiples of a semitone.


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