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4

The minor scales (natural, harmonic, and melodic) are intended as descriptive of compositional practice. The dorian and aeolian (minor) modes are permutations of the major scale and have different functional meaning. The dorian mode is actually quite a lot older than the minor scales: its modern form dating back to the early church modes, and that named ...


-3

OK, it's the 4th minor scale. And Mixolydian is the 2nd major one. It's interesting to know whether a mode is major or minor in quality. Maybe, if you're really into labelling, interesting to debate whether Locrian is minor or in a diminished class of its own. We don't normally number them within these categories. But you can, if you like. Historically, ...


3

I think a big challenge I’ve faced in transitioning boogie woogie piano (or blues piano also), is around restructuring grace notes to play up (or down) to the black keys. I’ve gotten sounds close to what I can make when playing Grace notes from sharps/flats onto the naturals, but there is the physical limitation imposed by the way a piano is built that I ...


0

Your question is basically an transcription/basic analysis question which is supposed to be off topic. But, a few points about scales might help work on this yourself. Starting with this G A# B C D Eb, my first question is whether A# is appropriate. Let's examine that first. If we omit a few notes... G x x C D x ...we get a very strong basis for a G tonic, ...


2

A scale is any set of notes that go up or down in by a consistent amount (cf https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scale). The most common scales everyone learns first are the those that start on the home note, and go up or down 8 notes in the key associated with that home note (properly called the "tonic"). But there are plenty of examples that do not. ...


0

Check out Fanfare for St Edmundsbury by Benjamin Britten. Three trumpets, each playing in a different key. So clever.


3

"Ma-" of Mary Had a Little Lamb doesn't start on the home note. It works its way down to the home note in the first three syllables, reaching the home note on "had". So no, it doesn't have to be the starting note.


0

i sometimes solo "off the 5th" or "off the 4th" in pentatonic scales . example being (in key of A) you can play D major pent, E major pent, D blues pent or E blues pent against the A and sound "fresher" (or at least interestingly different) as well as the A major pent and A blues pent against the A. playing a step below the root ...


6

You are asking more that one question. "Does a scale always have to start off with the note it is named after?" Yes, a D minor scale starting of F would be F major. Starting on E, it would be E locrean. The identity of the scale is determined by two factors (1) the intervals within it, e.g. Major is w-w-h-w-w-w-h, and (2) the starting note, e.g ...


4

The basic scale would start on the tonic. But you can specify modes of a scale. So, if you say just "D melodic minor scale" it would be understood as starting on D. If you say "fourth mode of D melodic minor" you would play the scale starting on the fourth degree, the G. But, when people talk about modes of a scale it often reframes the ...


18

Does a scale always have to start off with the note it is named after? A scale is a collection of notes with one of those notes designated as the 'home note'. When you're playing that scale in a learning context, like in a music exam, then you usually start on the note the scale is named after. When you're using the scale in real life music, you can start ...


3

The starting note of a song could be any note and it doesn't have to be within any scale. If a song is in a key, it doesn't have to be limited to any specific scale. Here is an example song in D minor. The melody starts with a G# note and ends on a C#.


4

There are two different questions here: A song can be in the key of X but not necessary start on the named note; however, it is likely to end on that note. If not, the ending will tend to be ambiguous. But when you ask about starting a scale on a different pitch, that's called a mode. For example, a C major scale played from D to D is called Dorian. For ...


2

If you wanted to sing a song in D minor you could start on whatever note you want. However, since it is in D minor, it should resolve to the D, but it doesn't have to start with it.


1

It's a bit of a vague question, as most music can be seen to move from key to key. Example in key C, a piece may well modulate for a short time into, say, key Am, or key F. So, from that point of view, the answer's yes, multiple keys in one piece. Orchestral works are known to modulate into several keys other than their original from start to end. But maybe ...


6

This is possible - in its fully-fledged form it's called Polytonality. Plenty of examples on that page. Another less extreme technique that is more common but could still be described as 'multiple keys at the same time' is modal mixture - using chords and notes from two different keys with the same tonic (e.g. using chords and notes from F minor and F major ...


11

In addition to the musical answers already given, there's a simple arithmetical answer: given 12 different tones (not counting enharmonic equivalents), since any diatonic scale uses 7 of them, any other scale must share at least two tones in common.


5

They might share only one note, but they share two pitches - hence the tritone shared. And actually, those shared pitches are only true in 12tet. Played in j.i., for example, I guess even those two pitches aren't exactly the same as each other. So, it's really, as other answers tell, down to note naming. In both keys (C and F♯), there's B, in key C there's ...


2

@Todd_Wilcox is on the money with his explanation (+1). Here is a little theoretical expansion of that idea. Please excuse my lame sloppy drawing of the cycle of 5ths: The way to visualize and understand this is to think of the cycle all in sharps (although you can also do it in all flats too). In relation to the key of C: At B, 5#’s you have 2 common tones,...


21

They share a note by name and another note by enharmonic equivalent. In your example, both C and F# have the note B. C has the note F, and F# has the note E#, which enharmonically equivalent to F. Of course B to F AKA E# is a tritone. The assertion that they only share one note discounts enharmonic equivalents. That’s all there is to that.


2

Imagine someone has written a song for you to sing, and you're a good singer. You get half way through, and you're straining to hit the high notes in that part. So much so that you sound awful, but the rest of the song works well. What should happen? Your voice won't go any higher - it sounds like a strangled parrot when you try. The solution is to lower the ...


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