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3

You have fallen into the trap of assuming that the 'Natural minor' scale is the ONLY form of minor scale. Until quite recently, standard teaching was that the Harmonic minor scale was the norm, sometimes modified into the Melodic minor. But they both used the sharpened leading note when ascending, which enabled a major dominant chord, a central feature of ...


2

Your melody's inherrent harmony (the one you imagine when you hear it) is C F | G C | a d | E a (lowercase indicates minor chord) This is more natural than having e a in the end, which would not have nearly as strong of a gravity towards the final note. You can also try A d | E a (i.e. using c# in bar 3), it will get yet a different feel, and whoa, you'll ...


1

Leaving aside the specific piece that prompted the question, the core of what's being asked is: How does RNA label out-of-key chords? There are three primary ways 1. Just add a sharp or flat before the Roman numeral Suppose we're in A minor and encounter a Bb major chord. This can be labeled bII ("flat two"). Similarly, in A major, and F major ...


3

I'm a newbie at this stuff but I'll take a crack at explaining why it sounds good to me. I think we can simplify the melody by reducing the n,n+1,n+2,n eighth notes (like C D E C) patterns to the first note n and removing the trailing eighth notes; brief or unrepeated notes make less of an impression. So then we're left with C F|B E|A D|G# A. We can break ...


22

You started in key C major, and you've modulated into key Am, its relative minor. True, there's no G♯ note in key C major, but key A minor has three slightly different incarnations, when written in scalar form, two of which actually do have that G♯. Those notes just before the last note, A, all work with the chord E, which most times in music will lead to A. ...


37

I would argue that your melody may not be in C major at all. C major and A natural minor share the same pitches, and your melody is constructed precisely in such a way that it can exist both in C major and in A minor! You might think, "Well, the first measure emphasizes C and E, which are both members of the C-major tonic triad." But they're also ...


11

Although A minor does not natively include G#, it is common practice to use G#, because it is the leading tone in A minor (and major). That is, it "leads" the ear to A, just as you've described. This idea is also discussed in When to deviate from scale? Technically, what you've composed is called a sequence, a pattern of sounds that is repeated on ...


1

Mozart often wrote sections that went through the entire (diatonic, 7 note) cycle of fifths. See Rudolph Rasch, "Circular Sequences in Mozart’s Piano Sonatas" in Dutch Journal of Music Theory, XI (2006), pp. 178-202.


1

The clever thing would be if you COULD sing it in the exact key of the recording without reference to it! This would indicate some degree of Perfect Pitch. Or maybe just physical memory, if you're used to singing along with the recording. The published sheet music of a song is often not in the exact same key as a well-known recording. I've sometimes ...


1

Yes there is a term for this. It is called "transposition". The tune is transposed into another key. You can read more on the matter here: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transposition_(music) Here is a quote from that link: The shifting of a melody, a harmonic progression or an entire musical piece to another key, while maintaining the same tone ...


2

It's called "relative pitch". It's the ability to accurately reproduce the relationships between between notes without reproducing the specific pitches. By singing the song in a different key, you have transposed the music (see this answer to your question), using relative pitch to keep everything sounding correct in the new key. You might also be ...


0

The keys are by no means redundant. Instruments wit nuts cannot really do keys with flats. It takes years of playing before a violinist meets F Major for the first time. On the other hand a instrument like a harp can only do keys with flats because your finger pluck towards you making it easier to think about going down than up. The musical notation system ...


11

The music-reading aspect of this is well covered. So, another perspective... Consider that Victor Wooten is best known an improvising musician. Moreover, he's a bass player, where understanding harmonic relationships is essential. I think it's no accident that in this video he never mentions music-reading, or even playing music at all (aside from scale ...


4

While a piece may not be in an "extreme" key, it's easy to find sections (maybe a few measures long) in almost any such key. Composers are fond of using parallel minors and majors of a given key. So we can start off with a simple B minor piece (2 sharps); then a section in B major (5 sharps) and a cycle of fifths in said B major. If the harmonic ...


3

Well, if we take the major key sigs: There is C major without sharps and flats, then there are 7 major sigs from one sharp to seven sharps and finally 7 major sigs from 1 flat to seven flats. Total is 15. Similar there are 15 minor key sigs. So the total is 30. That is what I have learned, so nothing new in that. Since you can actually encounter all of them ...


9

He's right with 30. That's two with no sharps/flats (Cmaj/Am), and given that the highest number of sharps/flats in a key signature can be seven, each, that's 28, including majors and relative minors. There's nothing in that which includes harmonic or melodic miniors - they're not keys - they're scales. So, let's take C♯ as one example (or C♯/A♯m as two!). ...


6

Here's a quote from the question with the question's incorrect assumption in bold: Say, I want to write a track in the key of D. So I have the notes D,E,F#,G,A,B & C#. I cannot use any other notes than these. Key is mostly about the home note. The home note is D. Secondarily, it is about the home chord, specifically, whether the home chord has a ...


3

There are many songs and tunes that contain just the 7 tones of the principal keys in major or minor: DoReMiFaSoLaTiDo or CDEFGABC and the relative minor keys. (Also many songs are built only on 5 tones=Pentatonic). A lot of songs are cadencing (half-stop after e.g. 8 bars) on the dominant (which is normally introduced by the V/V=secondary dominant). Even ...


4

The prevailing key (or chord, or scale) of a piece of music is a framework, not a restriction. It can be decorated, it can be distorted, it can be extended. It sets a baseline of normality so that you can do interesting abnormal things! Here's a simple and very common chord sequence in the key of C major. C, C♯dim7, Dm7, G7, C. The second chord is a '...


4

Even if we're exclusively in one diatonic scale, we would sometimes use out-of-chord notes in the melody, e.g. A over a C chord. As long as we approach them properly, the music would sound good (how exactly we do it is something you'll probably learn later on if you continue learning music theory). Out of chord notes create a temporary dissonance, which gets ...


9

It's a good question, and one a beginner may ponder for a long time! Simple answer involves terminology. Scales are simply sets of notes, ordered ascending/descending. So many (many, many) sets of notes exist - humans love ordering and pigeon-holing - and have done just that. One such scale incorporates all the notes found on a piano - the black and white ...


4

TL;DR Yes Caveat: I have not been able to access a Casio PX-160 to positively confirm this answer. Is it possible to play Chopin's Etude Op. 10 No. 1 at 176bpm? Yes. It requires outstanding technique, but it can be done. Can it be done on a Casio PX-160? Yes. The only technical issue would be the small handful of repeated notes. For example, the first two ...


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