New answers tagged

2 votes
Accepted

3:1 (or 1:3) interval, does it exist ? How to perform it from a C?

Wouldn't the resulting sound be highly agreable to hear ? Likely yes. It is attributed to Pythagoras to discover that notes which frequency ratios can be expressed with small integers are consonant. ...
user1079505's user avatar
  • 16.6k
3 votes

Why is the key typically the first and/or last note (or chord) of a song?

The root chord in any key will feel like home, just as any other will not feel like home. Music is similar to a journey, and when we think about it, a journey will start at home, and it's only really ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 192k
5 votes

Why is the key typically the first and/or last note (or chord) of a song?

The tonic is, by definition, the 'home' note and the tonic chord is the 'home chord'. Songs typically 'go home'. And, although they don't universally also start there, there's a strong possibility ...
Laurence's user avatar
  • 92.1k
11 votes

Why is the key typically the first and/or last note (or chord) of a song?

Tonal music is defined by the existence of a stable note that centers the music and acts as a kind of home base, called a tonic. In Western tonality, we name scales based on their tonic note. So we ...
crass_sandwich's user avatar
13 votes

Why is the key typically the first and/or last note (or chord) of a song?

There's no special reason for the first chord, but the last chord relates to the definition of being "in a key". The key note (the tonic) of a key is where the music feels most at rest, and ...
Aaron's user avatar
  • 86.8k
2 votes

Why is the key typically the first and/or last note (or chord) of a song?

A better word for your question might be “tonic”, or the home chord of any given key. Even more often than the first chord, the tonic is usually the last chord in songs. That is because the tonic is ...
John Belzaguy's user avatar

Top 50 recent answers are included