New answers tagged

0

Up a minor third is definitely uplifting, as in Louie Armstrong's La Vie En Rose, and Henry Mancini's version of Moon River as I recall... It's like fresh air comes in and brings a major/minor marriage to full bloom! :)


0

What complicated answers! No, on the same instrument, played by the same person, the F on the top of C - F is exactly the same as the F on the top of C - D - E - F. I really don't think trying to analyse any possible difference will be useful. Here's a possibly more productive question. Play the C major scale C - D - E - F - G - A - B - C. Now, with that ...


1

Relative changes and relationships are very important in music, so I think you sense of this makes sense. ..if i played the major scale ascendingily (C-D-E-F-G-A-B-C) does every interval in it sound the same when i play it like (C-D),(C-E),(C-G),etc..? If you put that into relative terms write it out with intervals... (C M2 D M2 E m2 F M2 G M2 A M2 B m2 C)...


3

You don't specify what instrument you're playing, but the wording makes it sound like there's no way that the pitches are actually changing, just your perception of them. (If this were an instrument like a violin or flute, which can adjust the intonation of individual notes, then maybe the F is actually different when approaching with intervallic vs scalar ...


1

When you say notes "sound different," that means the listener's experience of them is different. This is certainly possible, as music is a language, and the order of musical relationships can affect their perceived meaning. There are issues with tuning. On the piano, some scale intervals are a little "off," while the perfect 4th is very ...


3

The only reason they 'sound the same' is that they're all diatonic - they all belong to the key of C. The consecutive intervals (C>D, E>F, A>B etc.) are either one tone or one semitone. Starting from C, and using that as the lower note, all intervals are different. C>D =tone. C>E = M3, C>F = P4, C>G = P5. I don't understand how, say, C&...


5

What you describe has (almost) been done, in keyboard rather than piano form at least - the Dodeka_keyboard: The keys corresponding to C, E and A flat are highlighted to provide a visual reference as to 'where you are', but there's no mechanical reason these couldn't be white. This is a particular example of an Isomorphic keyboard.


1

It certainly could be done. It would just be a matter of lengthening and lowering the black keys and narrowing the white keys proportionally. To make the keys the width you're describing, could also be done, but the scale of the piano — the size, shape, and string-connection points of the iron frame — would have to be modified. To the degree it's been done ...


0

I've had the same question and I don't believe you're getting the answer you want. The answer is that while a G note resonates with C more favorably, because it's a fifth ... Doh Re Mi Fa Soh ... Soh (the G in Cmaj) rhymes with Doh (the C in Cmaj) better than Re (the D in Cmaj) rhymes with Doh. Take as another example two notes which are five octaves apart. ...


Top 50 recent answers are included