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2

It is my understanding that the key of a song is determined by the note or chord that serves as the predominant resolution. However I should point out that a song may have sections that modulate to another key, sometimes to the relative minor (same key signature) and other times to another unrelated key requiring a new key signature. To complicate matters ...


2

Your bare list of chords doesn't reveal how long each chord lasts, and how much emphasis it gets. Listening to the track, we hear B♭ pounded into our heads for much of the first section. The chorus centres more on Gm. These are two very connected keys, relative major and minor. So connected as to be almost the same key. In notation, they have ...


0

There are possibly at least a couple ways to do this, Transpose the Akai Pro MPK25 up using the octave key so that it will play the registers that the (untransposed) Alesis is currently playing Transpose the Akai Pro in your software DAW, again by whatever amount of octaves it takes to allow the Akai Pro to play the registers that the Alesis isn't For ...


1

It depends on your software and there might be some tricky configuration, but the short answer is yes. For example, you can definitely do this in Apple Mainstage and Ableton Live.


1

Those enharmonic keys are on the charts you included, because whoever made them decided to include them. They don't have to be included. They could have included additional keys with more and more sharps and flats, like putting G# major with A flat major. The only real limit to what key signatures someone lists is the practical limit of symbols for ...


3

The "true" circle of fifths is not a circle at all, but more of a spiral. A fifth above an A# is not an F, it's an E# (an F would be a diminished 6th). Another fifth (up from E#) is not C, but B# (for the same reason as before). This, therefore, leads us to the following: C->G->D->A->E->B->F#->C#->G#->D#->A#->E#->B#->F##->C##->G##->D##->A##->E##->B##->F###->...


6

C♭ major is rarely but actually still used in music, often as the relative major of A♭ minor. It makes sense for music to be written in A♭ minor despite its 7-flat key signature--I've always preferred how its dominant chord is spelled as an E♭ major chord with a natural instead of a D♯ major chord with a double sharp, for example--...


6

C♭ exists because it can! There are 7 flats in the key sig., and that's maximum - like there's 7 sharps in C♯. If it went on to the next, double sharps and flats would have to be used, and it would become too unwieldy. Occasionally, a piece will be written in a key and modulate. There have been times (no example comes to mind) where it's actually ...


1

I'm skeptical of the article you cited, but there's a lot of upside to basing a song on G. Not necessarily G Major mind you, but having G as the root of a song written in a minor key, or mode or something other than the traditional Major scale. One reason I like G as my key center is that it's near, but not at the bottom of the range of the instrument. I ...


1

I'm suspicious of that Spotify survey, not least because the chart was laid out by someone who includes A♯ minor and D♯ major in the list of keys. My experience tells me that while some genres (country perhaps) might tend towards guitar-friendly keys - not because the chord shapes are 'easier' but because of the characteristic licks that use ...


3

Another factor needs considering: not just each chord and how easy/hard it is to play, but the transitions from one to another. I don't believe that key G is easiest. The I IV and V are G C and D. Looking at the plane each hand shape has to be in, there's a lot of movement between each. I've always found that key E is easiest for beginners, who are able to ...


1

One thing to consider is that the open strings really only matter to guitarists on the less advanced side of the learning curve. Typically, guitarists care about open strings for two things: open chords (you know, two-three fingers and a bit of muting), and harmonics. Open chord voicings are what beginners use the open strings for (not that there's anything ...


-2

I invented a simple way to do that but the last time I posted the method it was flagged as being 'commercial content' despite that it's not anything I'm selling. Instead of detailing the steps to derive it I'll post what you need to know. Alternate letters starting at F ... add a space between. F _ G _ A _ B Alternate letters starting at C ... add a ...


0

Wach major scale is built by 2 equal tetrachords (ladder of 4 tones WWH WWH (Wholetone and Halftones, between the 2 tetrachords is also a wholetone. Do-Re-MiFa - So-La-TiDo. If you take the 2nd tetrachord of a scale (So-La-TiDo) and think the root tone of this one is now the root tone Do-Re-MiFa of a new scale and construct the 2nd tetrachord WWH -scales ...


6

learn the circle of fifths rules and you can work them out in your head. Its then easy to memorise the more you do it. Its even better than counting sheep to get to sleep. So, Start at C (C D E F G A B), move to the fifth G and sharp the fourth giving G A B C D E F# . repeat, taking D and sharping C gives you D major. Repeat ad somnolum.


0

It's not that hard to memorize all the notes as each of the scales is in alphabetical order (well it wraps after G back to A). But that means that you never skip notes, and you never repeat notes. But see how they are in order starting from the root back to the root: E♭ Major: E♭, F, G, A♭, B♭, C, D, E♭ A Major: A, B, C♯, D, E, F♯, G♯, A So as long as you ...


3

Basically, I want to have all the notes in every usable key memorized so that I can instantly just call them to my memory and play them. To me, recalling 'the notes' - (plural) - sounds slow, because it sounds like you need to remember and think about more than one thing before you've even touched the instrument. Personally, if I want to play in E minor, I ...


1

This site has a lot of good information about scales, as well as diagrams of where they fall on a piano keyboard. This site is a good reference for notation, intervals, etc. The way to get faster at it is to keep studying it until it becomes automatic. To get to where you want to be, study what intervals fall where in the different modal scales. Start with ...


8

Scales! By learning the scales of each key, you'll know the diatonic notes from each key. At the same time, by starting on different notes from each of those scales, the modes will gradually be revealed. Arpeggios! By learning the arpeggios of each key, you'll understand what a m3, M3, P5 etc. is in those keys. Then start transposing one line tunes into ...


0

Short answer Not possible (it does not make sense actually). Long answer From Wikipedia: Transposition or transposing in music means playing or writing music in a way that makes it sound higher or lower. This can be done by playing or writing the music in a different key, or by playing or writing it up or down an octave, without changing the key. ...


4

Interesting question! Not a clue with software, but it's possible - most times probable. No semitones to move from/to, because it's still in C - albeit C minor. Some of the notes will remain the same - those generally speaking being C F and G - which are the I IV and V of each major and its parallel minor. The note D will remain as such also. The problem ...


2

From major to minor is not a transposition - as Lawrence says. But you can with some software e.g. finale transpose a tune from C to a minor: a minor 3rd down diatonic, then adjust 6th and 7th degrees to the melodic minor scale, augmenting f to f# and g to g# in ascending movement (or to the harmonic if you want). Now you have transformed the tune ...


12

This isn't a transposition job. Call it a 'transformation' if you like. The music stays at the same pitch, but some notes change. Your basic scale will be C minor rather than C major. (But it won't be quite as simple as that, unless the piece is a simple folk tune sort of melody.) Show us sheet music for the song in question, we may be able to give more ...


0

The first thing necessary to formulate your thesis is to understand your data and what other approaches have already been implemented. If you are thinking of a dynamic or interactive approach take a look at chords and scales identifier. The reference to "Lotus Music" was useful, but it presents a static interface.


2

The key of my track was Ab minor, the key of the vocal was Eb minor, I watched a video about the circle of fifths and learned that I needed to transpose it down one fifth, and that's it.


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